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Plant Communication


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#1    GreenmansGod

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 01:17 PM

Do plants communicate with one another?  From some of the studies I have read the do.  They seem use a chemical form of communication.  I once read about an experiment where a tree was cut on one side of a forest and it was found trees on the other side of the forest reacted to it.   (I can't find the study, but I am looking.  I might have even seen it on this site if anyone remembers seeing it.)

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#2    Sherapy

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 04:39 PM

Good question Dark...I certainly think they do in some way, they definitely respond to love and care, they definitely grow better under those circumstances....


#3    Purplos

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 04:39 PM

I have also read things like this.  Something about a tree that, if attacked by ants/insects, would release a chemical and other trees would sense it somehow and would release a bitter sap (?) to repel the insects from themselves.  Basically one tree yelling "The bugs!  They got me!  Save yourselves!"

http://www.ezineplug.com/articles/12069/1/...Their-Needs-Met

Seems to be called Allelopathy.

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#4    =Jak=

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 05:07 PM

Quote


Good question Dark...I certainly think they do in some way, they definitely respond to love and care, they definitely grow better under those circumstances....



YES   thumbsup.gif

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#5    Raptor

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 05:28 PM

Quote


Good question Dark...I certainly think they do in some way, they definitely respond to love and care, they definitely grow better under those circumstances....


Care = Looking after the plant; feeding it, watering it, giving it sunlight etc.

...of course that will make the plant grow better; but it's not the emotions which alter its growth.

Allelopathy is the closest thing to communication among plants.


#6    zandore

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 06:32 PM

The idea that plants communicate chemically with one another has been around for a couple of decades, but it's only been in the last few years that solid scientific evidence has been accumulated to support the notion.

Over three seasons spanning 1996 through 1998, researchers from the University of California in Davis monitored wild tobacco plants growing near sagebrush. They clipped the leaves of some of the sagebrush plants to mimic the damage caused by insects. The sagebrush plants responded with a puff of a chemical called methyl jasmonate. In response, tobacco plants downwind immediately begin boosting the level of an enzyme called PPO that makes their leaves less tasty to plant-eating insects. Within minutes of the clipping of the sagebrush, the plants' PPO levels quadrupled.

It worked, too. Tobacco plants next to the clipped sagebrush suffered sixty percent less damage from grasshoppers and caterpillars than tobacco plants next to unclipped sagebrush.

Then, last fall, scientists at Kyoto University in Japan let spider mites loose on lima-bean plants and tracked the plants' responses. They found five different defense mechanisms. First, each injured plant released a chemical that changed its flavor, making it less attractive to the mites (although I personally nd it hard to imagine anything less attractive than the taste of a lima bean to begin with).


More: Plant Communication


It's not news anymore that plants may "cry in pain" when attacked or damaged by a hungry herbivore, but now we know that there is a way to stop all this vegetable "suffering" right in your medicine cabinet -- with simple aspirin.

Plants may not feel the pain of an injury as animals do, but they do have their own "alarm" reaction to tissue damage and, in an effect curiously similar to that in animals, this reaction can be short-circuited by aspirin and other similar drugs, according to a study recently published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry.


More: Study Shows Aspirin Blocks "Plant Pain"

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#7    The Skeptic Eric Raven

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 06:37 PM

Quote


Good question Dark...I certainly think they do in some way, they definitely respond to love and care, they definitely grow better under those circumstances....

I see you changed your name.

Do you think they scream when vegans eat them? innocent.gif

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#8    exeller

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 07:39 PM

Ok I'm here, and I'll repeat myself:

1) Our best science to date shows that plants lack any semblance of a central nervous system or any other system design for such complex capacities as that of a conscious suffering from felt pain.

2)Plants simply have no evolutionary need to feel pain. Animals being mobile would benefit from the ability to sense pain; plants would not. Nature does not create gratuitously such complex capacities as that of feeling pain unless there should be some benefit for the organism's survival.

Well, as Oliver Goldsmith realistically observed, "Every absurdity has its champions to defend it". And yes, we have some defenders who would ignore common sense and argue for plant pain. Remarkable!.

http://tabish.freeshell.org/animals/plantpain.html



#9    zandore

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 07:47 PM

From a different thread

Quote


In addition to all the other links I have posted for you:

Link 1
Link 2
Link 3

WARNING! This is some heavy reading.

Edited by zandore, 11 July 2006 - 07:47 PM.

"A man's ethical behavior should be based effectually on sympathy,
education, and social ties; no religious basis is necessary.
Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear
of punishment and hope of reward after death."

Albert Einstein


Survey Says....


#10    exeller

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:07 PM

Hey this is great, I could use this same link all day long  w00t.gif

Here we have the authority of logic, science and "truth" being imprecated against the sorry state of AR nescience and "mythology". Yet, no single published book, or paper in a scientific journal, has been cited as indeed making this claim that "plants feel pain". Sure, there is interesting evidence about plants reacting to local tissue damage and even sending signalling molecules serving to stimulate certain chemical defenses of nearby plants. But what has this got to do with supporting the only morally relevant claim worth considering, namely that "plants FEEL AND SUFFER from pain"? Where are the scientific references for this putative fact?

Although the plant pain promoters are fond of reductios, they will not likely appreciate the following extension of their own. By their "logic", it would equally be the case that rain clouds behave purposefully in the sense that they could be said to functionally remove, by way of raining, excessive moisture that is causing their overstaturation.

Furthermore, rain clouds bear meaningful information about their level of oversaturation in the form of weight relative to volume. Do not clouds, therefore, "sense" (in some tortured notion of the word) when atmospheric pressure is insufficient for their moisture content to remain in a vaporous state?

The promoters of plant pain would have us believe, against our good common sense, that by the mere presence of purposive BEHAVIOURS of avoidance and REACTIONS to tissue damage in plants we therefore must attribute to plants mental states like that of some kind of "felt pain".

Well, then by the same logic we must do the same to clouds. In the hole that these promoters of plant pain would dig for themselves, not only must we accept the thesis of plant pain, we would also have to swallow some notion of "cloud sentience"!

http://tabish.freeshell.org/animals/plantpain.html

Edited by exe11er, 11 July 2006 - 08:09 PM.


#11    Raptor

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:18 PM

Quote


Ok I'm here, and I'll repeat myself:

1) Our best science to date shows that plants lack any semblance of a central nervous system or any other system design for such complex capacities as that of a conscious suffering from felt pain.

2)Plants simply have no evolutionary need to feel pain. Animals being mobile would benefit from the ability to sense pain; plants would not. Nature does not create gratuitously such complex capacities as that of feeling pain unless there should be some benefit for the organism's survival.

Well, as Oliver Goldsmith realistically observed, "Every absurdity has its champions to defend it". And yes, we have some defenders who would ignore common sense and argue for plant pain. Remarkable!.

http://tabish.freeshell.org/animals/plantpain.html


Nice post. thumbsup.gif


#12    exeller

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:21 PM

Thanks RX, haven't seen you around in a while, nice to see you're back  yes.gif


#13    zandore

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:29 PM

Quote


Hey this is great, I could use this same link all day long  w00t.gif
http://tabish.freeshell.org/animals/plantpain.html

PSST exe.....look at the bottom of the web page and see what this guy is using as references innocent.gif

When you are done doing that look up his credentials..... wink2.gif

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Man would indeed be in a poor way if he had to be restrained by fear
of punishment and hope of reward after death."

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#14    exeller

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:33 PM

What does that have to do with anything? Tell me is it right or wrong?


#15    artymoon

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 08:35 PM

What about when you prune their limbs off, they seem to like that and grow better? Maybe its like trimming their toe nails. tongue.gif  Obviously trees react to their environment, and the environment reacts to them...so this would be a form of communication, right?





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