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There is something about Kerala


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#31    crystal sage

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 04:01 AM

I was wondering about the outcome of the Red Rains of Kerala..

Any change to the Flora or Fauna???

This article is interesting though...

Quote

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/...ia_kerala11.htm
Temperature and Pressure Experimentation with Red Rain Cells

Over several months, Dr. Louis began experimenting with different temperatures to see if the cells would respond. As the temperature rose, he saw more activity. Eventually he got up to 300 degrees Celsius, which is about 600 degrees Fahrenheit. He also increased the pressure to 300 pounds per square centimeter. It is assumed that normal Earth life would die at such a high temperature and pressure. But the red-walled cells in the Kerala rain water seemed to thrive.

No DNA?

During his experimentation with temperatures and pressures, Dr. Louis studied the cells under a microscope. As he watched, the cells produced smaller cells internally that were colorless, or whitish. He began calling those new, little cells “daughters” of the original “mother” cells. Once he counted as many as fifteen daughter cells bud inside one of the adult “mother cells.”



As the daughter cells grew, their cell walls also became red and eventually, the daughter cells erupted through the wall of the mother cell. This is clearly a process of replication. In normal Earth biology, replication of cell life requires the presence of DNA. But Dr. Louis could not find evidence of DNA in the proliferating cells inside his test tubes.
linked-image
Red adult "mother" cells and clear, or white, "daughter" cells in Kerala red rain water,
magnified under a microscope by a power of 1000. Average size of Kerala red rain cells are 10 microns.
Compare to normal red blood cells below, which average 7 microns in diameter. Photomicrograph
2006 by Louis Godfrey, Ph.D., Mahatma Ghandi University, India.

The controversy he knew would be provoked if he reported living cells that had no DNA, he told me recently, is why he kept his research of the red Kerala rain water to himself. But in January of 2006, he contacted the respected astrophysicist and astrobiologist, Chandra Wickramasinghe at Cardiff University in Wales. Soon Dr. Wickramasinghe had some vials of the red rain water to study. Dr. Wickramasinghe also sent some of the vials to biologists at Sheffield University in England.



And Dr. Louis sent more of the red rain water to scientists at Cornell University in the United States for isotopic ratio studies of the elemental composition of the red rain water. Elements confirmed so far are hydrogen, silicon, oxygen, carbon, and aluminum. The search is now on for phosphorous, which must be present if there is DNA. Scientists are also looking for definitive proof that there is – or is not – DNA in the mysterious replicating cells from the Kerala red rain.


Edited by crystal sage, 13 February 2008 - 04:03 AM.


#32    Shere Khaan

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 06:59 AM

This is a fascinating subject. I thought they had found an earthly answer so I lost interest, I might have to find out more now after reading that information.

EDIT: This appears to still be a mystery although at this website:

http://willowtrees.wordpress.com/2008/02/0...cells-in-india/

It seems that they got an initial return on DNA although this result is equivocal. Also they can't explain the high amount of aluminium by weight and the near absence of phosporus.

Edited by Shere Khaan, 13 February 2008 - 07:09 AM.


#33    crystal sage

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 10:15 PM

Shere Khaan on Feb , 05:59 PM)

This is a fascinating subject. I thought they had found an earthly answer so I lost interest, I might have to find out more now after reading that information.

EDIT: This appears to still be a mystery although at this website:

http://willowtrees.wordpress.com/2008/02/0...cells-in-india/

It seems that they got an initial return on DNA although this result is equivocal. Also they can't explain the high amount of aluminium by weight and the near absence of phosporus.

  Maybe the key to these cells are heat... Note he mentioned that the cells were more active when he applied extreme heat...

They could be life forms from a hot planet... that hibernate in cooler climates... perfect for space distribution...where most of the comets.. meteors are frozen..


http://www.google.com.au/search?q=unexplai...GGL:en&, said:


  Maybe the key to these cells are heat... Note he mentioned that the cells were more active when he applied extreme heat...

They could be life forms from a hot planet... that hibernate in cooler climates... perfect for space distribution...where most of the comets.. meteors are frozen..


http://www.google.com.au/search?q=unexplai...GGL:en&aq=t

maybe when it hit Earth atmosphere it melted... hence the rain...



#34    crystal sage

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 10:19 PM

laugh.gif   Just had a spooky thought... what if the flora and fauna in Kerala absorbed all these cells during the rains... and  the people  who drank from the water supply...

If we had an extreme heat wave...  or if the people drank lots of hot tea....or simply thru the chemical processes of metabolism... would these cells.. organisms be activated????  Would they mutate and evolve along with our DNA???


#35    crystal sage

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 11:51 PM

Radioactive sand causes mutations in human DNA

Quote

http://www.genomenewsnetwork.org/articles/...ral_radio.shtml
linked-image

Radioactive black sand in Kerala, southern India. Thousands of traditional fishing families have lived here for generations, exposed to the highest levels of natural radiation in the world.
2002 National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A.


The scientists identified 22 mutations in the mitochondrial DNA sequences of families living in the high-radiation area. By comparison, a control population living on white sand nearby only had one mutation.

Interestingly, these mutations were located at positions the researchers refer to as "evolutionary hot spots," which mutate much faster than other positions during evolution, according to the findings published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.



#36    crystal sage

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:49 PM

We know that Mushrooms thrive on radioactive soil... and...  yes.gif ... guess what??


Yep!!!
Kerala takes to mushroom farming
http://www.livemint.com/2008/03/26235919/H...a-takes-to.html



and bananas

http://www.keralabackwater.com/kerala-tour...-in-kerala.html




happy.gif

Quote

http://www.mail-archive.com/goanet@lists.g...g/msg33686.html

"Bananas!" replied Toff. I was even more intrigued,"Bananas? What have bananas got to do with this?" I said. Incidentally, the banana trees that grow in Moira, are even today considered the biggest and most tasty of Goa. And though much of the banana crop of this variety actually comes from places like Mencurem in Bicholim taluka, the sellers will always claim they are from Moira.

"Gusto, didn't you know that when our ancestors came from outer space, many moons ago, they brought with them radioactive soil which they sprinkled in the fields of Moira?" I said,"Really?" "Yes, it resulted in fine bananas, but the radiation has affected the genes of the banana planters, and now the children have gradually stopped coming."

I asked,"And do those bananas similarly affect the people who eat them" "No, Gusto, on the contrary those who consume Moira bananas, get a similar reaction to those who have drugs like ******, levitra and so on; only it is more natural and healthy.'

I said, "My God!! Toff, this is sensational! If this news gets out the sales of those pharmaceutical giants will plummet, and the banana prices will soar!!" "Yes, Gusto its a capitalist conspiracy. The media ensures that these bananas are less well known than they should be." And with a cryptic smile he went his way.

I can never tell when Teofilus is joking.



Edited by crystal sage, 05 February 2009 - 10:49 PM.


#37    crystal sage

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:00 PM

Some more news from the latest meteorite...

Quote

The SEM images, made at the School of Earth Sciences at Cardiff University, also show round cells similar in size and shape to those found in the "red rain" that fell in Kerala, India, in 2001. Several days after the fall of the Polonnaruwa meteorite in Sri Lanka, red rains fell there, too. The source of these cells is not clear.
But the diatoms are easily identified and clearly part of the meteorite. While this evidence is new, and therefore not yet widely accepted, it seems conclusive to us — it looks like life from space. Chandra Wickramasinghe has pioneered the theory of cometary panspermia for decades. We expect this evidence from his group to advance the theory considerably.

http://www.panspermi.../whatsnew72.htm



Cometary panspermia – Traces of life found inside meteorite
http://thewatchers.a...side-meteorite/


#38    crystal sage

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:07 PM

Some more corroborating evidence of the mysteries of the Red Rain..
http://thewatchers.a...side-meteorite/

"A carbonaceous meteorite that fell in Sri Lanka on December 29 contains fossilized diatoms. This observation comes in an online report by UK astrobiologists Chandra Wickramasinghe, Daryl H. Wallis and Jamie Wallis; and Anil Samaranayake of the Medical Research Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka. The meteorite has been designated the Polonnaruwa meteorite, for the historic ancient city near which it fell. The fossils are unmistakably diatoms, but their chemical composition so similar to that of the meteoritic matrix that they can hardly be Earthly contaminants, only a few days old.
Diatoms are easy to recognize because of their unique, articulated, perforated, geometric shapes. They grow in water or wet environments almost anywhere photosynthesis is possible. The cell walls are mostly rigid, brittle silica. (Larger versions of the figures here are available in the article linked below.)
The SEM images, made at the School of Earth Sciences at Cardiff University, also show round cells similar in size and shape to those found in the "red rain" that fell in Kerala, India, in 2001. Several days after the fall of the Polonnaruwa meteorite in Sri Lanka, red rains fell there, too. The source of these cells is not clear.
But the diatoms are easily identified and clearly part of the meteorite. While this evidence is new, and therefore not yet widely accepted, it seems conclusive to us — it looks like life from space. Chandra Wickramasinghe has pioneered the theory of cometary panspermia for decades. We expect this evidence from his group to advance the theory considerably.


#39    crystal sage

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:09 PM

Some more information that could be of interest here..




http://www.lankaweb....d-in-500-years/

Edited by crystal sage, 05 March 2013 - 03:14 PM.


#40    crystal sage

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:10 PM

Sorry my computer is playing up again..



http://www.dailynews...1/16/news11.asp



Edited by crystal sage, 05 March 2013 - 03:18 PM.


#41    crystal sage

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:22 PM

Some more info here...  http://www.huffingto..._n_2500008.html


#42    crystal sage

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:19 AM

Found out the latest on the after effects of the Red Rain...   http://www.thehindu....icle7057859.ece

Quote

A recent study by Indian and Austrian scientists has led to the discovery of the cause of the ‘Blood Rain’ phenomenon to be dispersal of spores of micro algae. Since 1896, reports have been coming in of sporadic instances of red coloured rain over parts of Kerala and Sri Lanka. The latest one was in 2013 over Kerala.
but then they can't say for sure  how these spores formed a cloud ...

Quote

But if the spores travelled across the Arabian Sea all the way to Kerala and Sri Lanka, why did the phenomenon not occur in intermediate regions like Gujarat, MP?
Answering this query, Dr. Bast noted in an email to this Correspondent: “We don't have any proof for this "clouds over ocean" hypothesis, but probability is high because this is how spores of Trentepohlia get transported. How exactly these lower stratospheric clouds got into Kerala remains unknown but aerial route from Austria to Kerala won't pass through other states like Gujarat, MP etc. It might be related to monsoon as well, as Kerala is the first state which the SW monsoon strikes together with Sri Lanka.”
  


:whistle:  they are still trying after all these years to prove it was a natural phenomena...  ( like the biblical red seas? )   did they check the DNA of the rain and the spores??? or did the rain seed the algae ? https://en.wikipedia..._rain_in_Kerala

Quote

Their work indicated that the particles were of biological origin (consistent with the CESS report), however, they invoked the panspermia hypothesis to explain the presence of cells in a supposed fall of meteoric material.[40][41][42] Additionally, using ethidium bromide they were unable to detect DNA or RNA in the particles. Two months later they posted another paper on the same web site entitled "New biology of red rain extremophiles prove cometary panspermia"[43] in which they reported that


"The microorganism isolated from the red rain of Kerala shows very extraordinary characteristics, like the ability to grow optimally at 300 °C (572 °F) and the capacity to metabolise a wide range of organic and inorganic materials."

These claims and data have yet to be verified and reported in any peer reviewed publication. In 2006 Louis and Kumar published a paper in Astrophysics and Space Science entitled "The red rain phenomenon of Kerala and its possible extraterrestrial origin"[3] which reiterated their arguments that the red rain was biological matter from an extraterrestrial source but made no mention of their previous claims to having induced the cells to grow. The team also observed the cells using phase contrast fluorescence microscopy, and they concluded that: "The fluorescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectangle Nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin."[44] One of their conclusions was that if the red rain particles are biological cells and are of cometary origin, then this phenomenon can be a case of cometary panspermia.[3]
In August 2008 Louis and Kumar again presented their case in an astrobiology conference.[45] The abstract for their paper states that


"The red cells found in the red rain in Kerala, India are now considered as a possible case of extraterrestrial life form. These cells can undergo rapid replication even at an extreme high temperature of 300 °C. They can also be cultured in diverse unconventional chemical substrates. The molecular composition of these cells is yet to be identified".

In September 2010 he presented a similar paper at a conference in California, USA[46]



#43    crystal sage

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:45 AM

...  http://asianetindia....eading-our-way/

Quote

The year 2013 may someday be known as the year of the comets.If all goes well we may see two of the brightest comets in many years and possibly one of the brightest in history. Astronomers are being very cautious in their predictions because of past disappointments. Comets are like cats, they have tails and they do precisely what they want. Once thought of as harbingers of doom, comets are now known to be normal members of our solar system. They are small bodies similar to asteroids. The majority spend most of their lives in the Oort Cloud, a mysterious region on the outer edge of the solar system.
Now and then they venture close to the sun and undergo a strange transformation. The heat of the sun causes the comets ice, which is their main component, to vaporize. There are always comets in the sky,but most are too far from the sun to develop large tails, and too far from Earth to be seen with the naked eye. Bright comets appear only every few years, so it is very rare for two comets to appear in a single year. 2013 looks to be one of those special years.

http://asianetindia....eading-our-way/


  




Quote

A bright fireball accompanied by sonic boom was seen and recorded falling from the sky over Kerala, India on Friday, February 27, 2015. The fireball left behind orange trail as it descended.
The phenomenon reportedly happened at around 17:00 UTC (22:30 local time) and lasted for a few seconds in many parts of Kerala, including Ernakulam, Vypin, Paravoor, Kolenchery, Fort Kochi, Willington Island, Thrissur, Palakkad, Thiruvananthapuram, Kollam, Kozhikode, Malappuram and Kannur



http://thewatchers.a...r-kerala-india/


Is there a special vortex in Kerala ? why is it attracting all this phenomena ?


#44    crystal sage

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 02:47 AM

... https://en.wikipedia...erala_meteorite   why the cover ups??   the attempts to minimize all these incidents.. the red rain... what is really happening in this area?

Edited by crystal sage, 25 March 2016 - 02:54 AM.





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