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Some truths about Global Warming


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#1    Test Subject

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 07:44 PM

Earth's climate and the biosphere have been in constant flux, dominated by ice ages and glaciers for the past several million years. We are currently enjoying a temporary reprieve from the deep freeze. Approximately every 100,000 years Earth's climate warms up temporarily. These warm periods, called interglacial periods, appear to last approximately 15,000 to 20,000 years before regressing back to a cold ice age climate.

Follow this link:

http://www.clearlight.com/~mhieb/WVFossils/ice_ages.html

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#2    greggK

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 08:32 PM

Here is a truth:

The earths core is a hot ball of iron.  So hot that if there was no buffer between the surface and the core, we would all burn up quickly.  Nothing would be able to survive, nothing.  On the other end of the spectrum there is the sun.  And, guess what?  It is a huge ball of burning iron.  The same thing is in the sun as is in the core of earth, but the sun is so huge and so hot that not a thing will ever be able to touch the surface, ever.  
The soil of the earth is made up of the heavy elements in the periodical table and that includes all of the metal elements; put 'em all together and you might get the surface of the core.  And the soil is very conducive to heat.  Now why haven't we burned up?

OIL . . . OIL . . . OIL

We have now reached a point to where the earth's atmosphere is becoming saturated with the elements that are given off from burning oil.  And to top that or saying it differently, underneath that we are pulling out the buffer, the oil.  We have disrupted the homeostasis between the atmosphere and the core.  There is not much time left, but we cannot replace the oil that we have pulled out of the earth and in that we have failed in our jobs to 'replenish the earth.'

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#3    Ravinar

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 08:38 PM

Quote

Earth's climate and the biosphere have been in constant flux, dominated by ice ages and glaciers for the past several million years. We are currently enjoying a temporary reprieve from the deep freeze. Approximately every 100,000 years Earth's climate warms up temporarily. These warm periods, called interglacial periods, appear to last approximately 15,000 to 20,000 years before regressing back to a cold ice age climate.

Follow this link:

http://www.clearlight.com/~mhieb/WVFossils/ice_ages.html



looks like one of bush's discrediting campaign sites sleepy.gif



"Total human contributions to greenhouse gases account for only about 0.28% of the "greenhouse effect" (Figure 2)"

this is a pic of the earth at night just to give you an idea of the impact we humans have on this planet.
linked-image


all those lights you see are citys and towns all of witch are pumping out CO2 24 hours a day 7 days a week all year long. and your trying to tell me that dosn't make an impact? get real man. no.gif


the human race is at an end and and my soul grows weary. the one thing that could revive it is almost gone and is in no condition to heal me. yet i shall not despair for the light of hope shines even in the greatest darkness. i shall continue to hope.... hope for the days of green and ever lasting love of all things. for those whom think them selfs better shall realize they are not all that is. nor are they in any way better for all life is equal.

#4    greggK

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 08:53 PM

Quote

looks like one of bush's discrediting campaign sites sleepy.gif
"Total human contributions to greenhouse gases account for only about 0.28% of the "greenhouse effect" (Figure 2)"

this is a pic of the earth at night just to give you an idea of the impact we humans have on this planet.
linked-image
all those lights you see are citys and towns all of witch are pumping out CO2 24 hours a day 7 days a week all year long. and your trying to tell me that dosn't make an impact? get real man. no.gif


The greenhouse effect involves primarily METHANE.  

Methane, like carbon dioxide, traps heat in Earth's atmosphere. Scientists have been studying natural sources of methane for decades but hadn't pegged plants as a producer, notes Frank Keppler, a geochemist at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Previously recognized sources of methane include bacterial action in the digestive systems of ruminants such as cows and in the saturated soils of swamps and rice paddies.

In other words, they have just found out that the green stuff that people are trying to save is a factor in global warming.  Idn't that nice!

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#5    aquatus1

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:01 PM

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On the other end of the spectrum there is the sun.  And, guess what?  It is a huge ball of burning iron.  The same thing is in the sun as is in the core of earth, but the sun is so huge and so hot that not a thing will ever be able to touch the surface, ever.


Umm...no.
  

Quote

The soil of the earth is made up of the heavy elements in the periodical table and that includes all of the metal elements; put 'em all together and you might get the surface of the core.  And the soil is very conducive to heat.  Now why haven't we burned up?

OIL . . . OIL . . . OIL

We have now reached a point to where the earth's atmosphere is becoming saturated with the elements that are given off from burning oil.  And to top that or saying it differently, underneath that we are pulling out the buffer, the oil.  We have disrupted the homeostasis between the atmosphere and the core.  There is not much time left, but we cannot replace the oil that we have pulled out of the earth and in that we have failed in our jobs to 'replenish the earth.'


...Wow...interesting...

Is there...anything...that you might offer to support your...claim?


#6    Ravinar

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:20 PM

Quote

The greenhouse effect involves primarily METHANE.  

Methane, like carbon dioxide, traps heat in Earth's atmosphere. Scientists have been studying natural sources of methane for decades but hadn't pegged plants as a producer, notes Frank Keppler, a geochemist at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Previously recognized sources of methane include bacterial action in the digestive systems of ruminants such as cows and in the saturated soils of swamps and rice paddies.

In other words, they have just found out that the green stuff that people are trying to save is a factor in global warming.  Idn't that nice!



you think thats bad... http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum...showtopic=67244 this is thread i started on Global Dimming. the smog and ash we put in the atmosphere is actually helping to cool down are planet. but since we started putting filters in the smoke stacks were actually increasing the rate of global warming. now Idn't that nice hmm.gif are planet is a very complex place.

the human race is at an end and and my soul grows weary. the one thing that could revive it is almost gone and is in no condition to heal me. yet i shall not despair for the light of hope shines even in the greatest darkness. i shall continue to hope.... hope for the days of green and ever lasting love of all things. for those whom think them selfs better shall realize they are not all that is. nor are they in any way better for all life is equal.

#7    greggK

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:36 PM

Quote

Umm...no.  (Find out what the surface of the sun is made of - there is a surface and it is metal)
  
...Wow...interesting...

Is there...anything...that you might offer to support your...claim?


Is there anything that you can offer to dispute my claim?

The inside of the sun is Hydrogen and Helium ions.  Look at a photgraph of any nebula.  Now, why do you think that they are that way?  A planet blew apart.  A copy of the 'big bang.'  

Do you know why your heart beats or why you mind thinks?

Is it Hydrogen and Helium ions?  No, it is a little farther down the periodic table.  It is Sodium and Potassium ions.  We are like first cousins of the sun.

Edited by greggK, 18 January 2007 - 09:46 PM.

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#8    frogfish

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:43 PM

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The inside of the sun is Hydrogen and Helium ions. Look at a photgraph of any nebula. Now, why do you think that they are that way? A planet blew apart. A copy of the 'big bang.' This sun is the planet that blew apart in the 'big bang.'

Dude, do you even know what you're talking about? Yes, the core is hot. The same goes for the sun, but we are sooooooo far away from each (6400 miles from the core, 93 million from the sun) that we can enjoy the warmth they provide. There's no oil in the air!

Yes, a star is primarily made up of helium and Hydrogen, but nebulae is just "space dust".  Supernovae remnants are called Planetary nebula...which is when a star "sheds" its out layers in brilliant rings.

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#9    greggK

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 09:57 PM

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Dude, do you even know what you're talking about? Yes, the core is hot. The same goes for the sun, but we are sooooooo far away from each (6400 miles from the core, 93 million from the sun) that we can enjoy the warmth they provide. There's no oil in the air!

Yes, a star is primarily made up of helium and Hydrogen, but nebulae is just "space dust".   Supernovae remnants are called Planetary nebula...which is when a star "sheds" its out layers in brilliant rings.There's no oil in the air!


There's no oil in the air!

Burning oil creates what?

but nebulae is just "space dust".

That's what I said.  A planet blew apart.

Considering the difference in the distance between the core and the surface and the surface and the sun is another thing that is in my favor.

Edited by greggK, 18 January 2007 - 09:59 PM.

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#10    Reincarnated

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 10:00 PM

Thanks for posting the thread that finally ends the global warming debate! It's debunked now so no more posts about global warming, ok UM? Move on people, nothing to see here. laugh.gif


(I'm not serious by the way)


#11    frogfish

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 10:02 PM

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That's what I said. A planet blew apart.
No...not from a planet. From a star, or space just left over from the creation of the universe.

Quote

Considering the difference in the distance between the core and the surface and the surface and the sun is another thing that is in my favor.

Actually, no it isn't. It basic knowledge learned in 4th grade.

Quote

There's no oil in the air!

Burning oil creates what?

A whole concotion of gases, but do you think the dinosaurs burnt oil? How about early synapsids? Could Dunkleosteus burn oil?

If you could find ANYTHING that would support your outrageous and hilarious claims, please post them

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#12    carini

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 10:58 PM

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There's no oil in the air!

Burning oil creates what?

but nebulae is just "space dust".

That's what I said.  A planet blew apart.

Considering the difference in the distance between the core and the surface and the surface and the sun is another thing that is in my favor.



What in the world are you talking about?


#13    m. Moe

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 11:02 PM

Quote

looks like one of bush's discrediting campaign sites sleepy.gif
"Total human contributions to greenhouse gases account for only about 0.28% of the "greenhouse effect" (Figure 2)"

this is a pic of the earth at night just to give you an idea of the impact we humans have on this planet.
linked-image
all those lights you see are citys and towns all of witch are pumping out CO2 24 hours a day 7 days a week all year long. and your trying to tell me that dosn't make an impact? get real man. no.gif

Thats kinda bad, but I still think that that picture is pretty cool.

But you cannot really deny global warming. It's happening.

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#14    aquatus1

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 12:01 AM

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Is there anything that you can offer to dispute my claim?


Yes, most of it from primary educcation, but then, It is not up to me to dispute every extraordinary claim that comes along, but rather it is up to the person making the extraordinary claim to provide support for it.

Quote

The inside of the sun is Hydrogen and Helium ions.
I thought you said inside the sun was a huge ball of burning iron?  In all cases, yes, inside the sun, there is hydrogen and helium.  There is no molten anything in the sun or on the surface. The entire thing is gaseous.  No iron crust.  The content of the sun that isn't hydrogen or helium is a little more than .10% of a variety of different elements.

Quote

Look at a photgraph of any nebula.  Now, why do you think that they are that way?  A planet blew apart.  A copy of the 'big bang.'


Planets do not blow up to create nebulas.  If you are suggesting they do, please support how this would come about.

Quote

Do you know why your heart beats or why you mind thinks?
Yes, I am quite familiar with human physiology.

Quote

Is it Hydrogen and Helium ions?  No, it is a little farther down the periodic table.  It is Sodium and Potassium ions.  We are like first cousins of the sun.


What does that have to do with ANYTHING that we are talking about?


#15    greggK

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 12:32 AM

Quote

A whole concotion of gases, but do you think the dinosaurs burnt oil? How about early synapsids? Could Dunkleosteus burn oil?


This is to frogfish:
If burning oil creates a whole concoction of gases, what would happen when those gases were frozen again?   I don't know but if the gases are gas because of the speed of the electron around the nucleus, slowing down the speed of the revolution will cause the atom to bind with cousins andd uncles and sisters and brothers and you'll get oil again and I've never seen frozen oil.
I'm on the side of the 4th graders.
I do not know how to post pictures here, but you find a picture of a nebula, look at it and tell me what you see and I will add, you do not see nothing and the Milky Way is not a nebula!

This is me:
Is it Hydrogen and Helium ions? No, it is a little farther down the periodic table. It is Sodium and Potassium ions. We are like first cousins of the sun.

And this is aquatis1:
What does that have to do with ANYTHING that we are talking about?  

me:
That is how you create the heat in your body!  Since we are talking about Global Warming

QUOTE me:
The inside of the sun is Hydrogen and Helium ions.

Aquatis1:
I thought you said inside the sun was a huge ball of burning iron? In all cases, yes, inside the sun, there is hydrogen and helium. There is no molten anything in the sun or on the surface. The entire thing is gaseous. No iron crust. The content of the sun that isn't hydrogen or helium is a little more than .10% of a variety of different elements.

me:
The .1% is the surface and there are no elements in the sun.  There are ions of hydrogen and ions of helium.  Ions are unstable atoms.  The atom of hydrogen has 1 electron and the atom of helium has 2.  The sun is the sun through the process of fusion of the the ions of hydrgen an helium.  When these two atoms fuse, what is given off is 'ta-da' heat and . . . a neutrino (a neutral electron).  These neutrinos create the solar winds and you see these neutrinos when you look at the Northern Lights

I will add this:
The border between the sun and space is . . . I don't know the answer to that one but I wil find out.  That is your .1%; that might not be iron, but it is a metal and why we have sunspots.

Edited by greggK, 19 January 2007 - 12:43 AM.

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