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Second Ariane Mission of 2007


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#16    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 03 May 2007 - 11:02 PM

May 3, 2007

Weather conditions delay the Ariane 5's launch for 24 hours


Arianespace's second dual-payload flight of 2007 was postponed today due to weather conditions at Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana. The mission has been rescheduled for the same 44-minute launch window tomorrow

Today's weather "red" was due to high-altitude winds over French Guiana, which exceeded the established safety margins. Although it was raining during this evening's launch attempt, these wet conditions did not influence the postponement – as Ariane 5 is able to launch in the rain.

Both the Ariane 5 and its two satellite passengers – SES ASTRA's ASTRA 1L and Intelsat's Galaxy 17 – have been placed in a safe standby mode, ready for a resumption of the launch countdown tomorrow.

linked-image


Source: Arianespace Mission Updates

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 04 May 2007 - 03:27 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#17    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 09:22 PM

May 4, 2007

Final countdown resumes for Arianespace's dual-payload mission


The final countdown has resumed for Arianespace's heavy-lift mission with SES ASTRA's ASTRA 1L and Intelsat's Galaxy 17 satellites, which is set for a 44-minute launch window this evening that opens at 7:29 p.m. in French Guiana (22h29 GMT, 00:29 a.m. in Paris and 6:29 p.m. in Washington, D.C.).

Yesterday's countdown was stopped before liftoff because of high-altitude winds over French Guiana, which exceeded the established safety margins. The Ariane 5 remained in the ELA-3 launch zone overnight, allowing the mission to be rescheduled for today.

This flight will be Arianespace's second dual-payload mission of 2007, and is to loft a total mass of 9,402 kg. a record performance for a mission to standard geostationary transfer orbit. The combined weight includes the two satellite payloads, their installation hardware, as well as Ariane 5's multiple deployment system that enables the launcher to perform its efficient dual-spacecraft launches.

linked-image


Source: Arianespace Mission Updates

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#18    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 10:47 PM

May 4, 2007

Liftoff of Ariane 5 with the ASTRA 1L and Galaxy 17 satellites


The Ariane 5 for Arianespace's second dual-payload flight of 2007 has lifted off from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana, carrying a record payload for deployment into geostationary transfer orbit.

The upper passenger for today's mission, ASTRA 1L for SES ASTRA, will be deployed first in the flight sequence, separating from Ariane 5 approximately 27 minutes after liftoff. It will be followed by the Intelsat Galaxy 17 spacecraft, which is to be released about three minutes later.

ASTRA 1L weighs 4,505 kg. at launch, and will be located at 19.2 East ASTRA's prime position for delivering broadcast services to continental Europe. The spacecraft also is to extend ASTRA's coverage from the Canary Islands in the West to the Russian border in the East, and it will further strengthen SES ASTRA's unique in-orbit back-up scheme.

Galaxy 17 is designed for a 15-year operational life, providing television and telecommunications services for customers of the international Intelsat organization. This satellite weighed in at 4,100 kg. for today's liftoff.


Source: Arianespace Mission Updates

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#19    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 04 May 2007 - 11:08 PM

linked-image
The Ariane 5 is shown in the Spaceport's ELA-3 launch zone, ready for liftoff on the second of six missions planned for 2007.


May 4, 2007

Another Ariane 5 success, with a new record performance to geostationary transfer orbit


Ariane 5 delivered a record performance during Arianespace's second heavy-lift flight of 2007, deploying two large telecommunications satellites into geostationary transfer orbit today.

Launched from the ELA-3 complex at Europe's Spaceport, the Ariane 5 orbited ASTRA 1L for SES ASTRA and Galaxy 17 for Intelsat – marking the 18th consecutive success for Arianespace's workhorse launch vehicle.

"This comes less than two months after our previous success, which demonstrates our consistent launch tempo," said Arianespace Chairman & CEO Jean-Yves Le Gall. "We have launched six Ariane 5s and two Soyuz in less than twelve months, establishing Arianespace as the world reference for the launch services industry."

The customers for today's mission are key international satellite communications companies, and both are long-time users of Arianespace launch services.

"Astra 1L is the ninth satellite we have launched for SES Astra and the 26th for the SES family," Le Gall added in post-launch comments from the Spaceport's Jupiter mission center. "Just last December, we orbited AMC-18, and now - five months later - it was Astra 1L's turn. In addition, we will launch AMC-21 next year."

The ASTRA 1L platform is equipped with 29 Ku-band and 2 Ka-band transponders, and will deliver broadcast services to continental Europe from an orbital slot of 19.2 East. This 4,505-kg. communications platform also is to extend ASTRA's coverage from the Canary Islands in the West to the Russian border in the East, and it will further strengthen SES ASTRA's unique in-orbit back-up scheme.

Intelsat is a loyal Arianespace customer as well, and the 4,100-kg. Galaxy 17 spacecraft orbited today become the organization's 38th satellite to use an Ariane launcher. Fitted with 24- Ku-band and 24 C-band transponders, Galaxy 17 is designed to provide television and telephony services for North America.

"More than 60 percent of Intelsat satellites have been launched by Arianespace, and this fall, we will launch two more satellites for Intelsat," Le Gall added. "I want to thank Intelsat for the confidence it has had in our company from the very beginning."

Today's flight lofted a total mass estimated at just over 9,400 kg. – a record performance for a mission to standard geostationary transfer orbit. This included the weight of the two satellite payloads, their integration hardware, as well as Ariane 5's multiple deployment system that enables the launcher to perform its efficient dual-spacecraft launches.

The mission originally had been scheduled for May 3, but was delayed 24 hours by high-altitude winds over French Guiana, which exceeded the established safety margins. The weather cooperated for tonight's launch – even providing a break in the rainy conditions that allowed the launcher's initial ascent to be viewed, including separation of the Ariane 5's two solid boosters approximately 2 min. 20 sec. into the flight.


Source: Arianespace Mission Updates

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 06 May 2007 - 12:09 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#20    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 12:08 AM

linked-image
The Ariane 5 is shown in the Spaceport's ELA-3 launch zone, ready for liftoff on the second of six missions planned for 2007.
May 4, 2007

Another Ariane 5 success, with a new record performance to geostationary transfer orbit


Ariane 5 delivered a record performance during Arianespace's second heavy-lift flight of 2007, deploying two large telecommunications satellites into geostationary transfer orbit today.

Launched from the ELA-3 complex at Europe's Spaceport, the Ariane 5 orbited ASTRA 1L for SES ASTRA and Galaxy 17 for Intelsat marking the 18th consecutive success for Arianespace's workhorse launch vehicle.

"This comes less than two months after our previous success, which demonstrates our consistent launch tempo," said Arianespace Chairman & CEO Jean-Yves Le Gall. "We have launched six Ariane 5s and two Soyuz in less than twelve months, establishing Arianespace as the world reference for the launch services industry."

The customers for today's mission are key international satellite communications companies, and both are long-time users of Arianespace launch services.

linked-image
Ariane 5 begins its ascent for another highly
accurate Arianespace mission.


The 26th SES satellite launched by Ariane, and the 45th for Intelsat

"ASTRA 1L is the ninth satellite we have launched for SES ASTRA and the 26th for the SES family," Le Gall added in post-launch comments from the Spaceport's Jupiter mission center. "Just last December, we orbited AMC-18, and now five months later it was ASTRA 1L's turn. In addition, we will launch AMC-21 next year."

The ASTRA 1L platform is equipped with 29 Ku-band and 2 Ka-band transponders, and will deliver broadcast services to continental Europe from an orbital slot of 19.2 East. This 4,500-kg. communications platform also is to extend ASTRA's coverage from the Canary Islands in the West to the Russian border in the East, and it will further strengthen SES ASTRA's unique in-orbit back-up scheme.

Intelsat is a loyal Arianespace customer as well, and the 4,100-kg. Galaxy 17 spacecraft orbited today become the organization's 45th satellite to use an Ariane launcher since 1983. Fitted with 24 Ku-band and 24 C-band transponders, Galaxy 17 is designed to provide television and telephony services for North America.

"About 60 percent of Intelsat satellites have been launched by Arianespace, and this fall, we will launch two more satellites for Intelsat," Le Gall added. "I want to thank Intelsat for the confidence it has had in our company from the very beginning."

Today's flight lofted a total mass estimated at just over 9,400 kg. a record for a mission to standard geostationary transfer orbit. This included the weight of the two satellite payloads, their integration hardware, as well as Ariane 5's multiple deployment system that enables the launcher to perform its efficient dual-spacecraft launches.

The mission originally had been scheduled for May 3, but was delayed 24 hours by high-altitude winds over French Guiana, which exceeded the established safety margins. The weather cooperated for tonight's launch even providing a break in the rainy conditions at French Guiana, allowing the launcher's initial ascent to be viewed, including separation of the Ariane 5's two solid boosters approximately 2 min. 20 sec. into the flight.

A symbolic mission for international space cooperation

In his post-launch comments, Le Gall also acknowledged the symbolic importance of today's mission for international space activity as the European-built Ariane 5 carried both European and American satellite payloads. He said this illustrates the common objectives of Europe and the United States in space, and noted the cooperation will be extended in the future with Ariane 5's launch of the European ATV re-supply spacecraft to the International Space Station.

"I am very pleased and honored to welcome tonight a U.S. delegation led by my personal friend, Mike Griffin, the NASA Administrator," Le Gall said. "This delegation is visiting our facility in preparation for the historic ATV launch."

Le Gall also announced Arianespace's upcoming missions. The first will be in the next few weeks, when Arianespace affiliate Starsem launches a Soyuz vehicle from Baikonur Cosmodrome with the Globalstar 1R payload. This will be followed in August by another heavy-lift Ariane 5 mission from Europe's Spaceport, which is to carry the SPACEWAY 3 and B-SAT 3A satellites.


Source: Arianespace Mission Updates

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#21    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 12:22 AM

Kourou, French Guiana, May 4, 2007

Mission Accomplished for Arianespace
Astra 1L and Galaxy 17 in orbitt



On Friday evening, May 4, Arianespace placed two communications satellites into geostationary transfer orbit: Astra 1L for the European operator SES Astra, and Galaxy 17 for the international operator Intelsat.

32nd Ariane 5 launch, 18th success in a row


The latest successful launch of an Ariane 5, the second in 2007, confirms that Arianespace's launch Services & Solutions continue to set the standard for all major telecom operators worldwide.

Today, Ariane 5 is the only commercial launcher in service capable of simultaneously launching two payloads.

A launch for two prestigious, loyal customers

Astra 1L is the ninth SES Astra satellite to be launched by Arianespace. SES Astra is the leading direct-to-home (DTH) broadcast system in Europe, serving more than 109 million households via DTH and cable networks. Satellites in the SES Astra fleet transmit 1,864 TV and radio stations.

Galaxy 17 is the 45th Intelsat satellite to use an Ariane launcher since 1983. More than 60% of the Intelsat satellites in service today were orbited by the European launch vehicle. Intelsat is currently the world's largest supplier of fixed satellite services (FSS). Its services are used by an extensive customer base including some of the world's leading media and communications companies, multinational corporations, Internet service providers and government/military organizations.

Record backlog of orders

Arianespace has signed six new launch Service & Solutions contracts since the beginning of the year, bringing its backlog to 39 satellites to be launched after this evening's mission. Four more Ariane 5 launches are scheduled by the end of 2007.

Astra 1L/Galaxy 17 mission at a glance

The mission was carried out by an Ariane 5 ECA launcher from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Liftoff was on Friday, May 4, at 7:29 pm local time in Kourou (6:29 pm in Washington, DC, 22:29 UT, and on Saturday May 5 at 12:29 am in Paris).

Provisional parameters at injection of the cryogenic upper stage (ESC-A) were:
Perigee: 248.2 km for a target of 248.2 km (3)
Apogee: 35,958 km for a target of 35,947 km (160)
Inclination: 5.9 degrees for a target of 6.0 degrees (0.06)

Astra 1L, built by Lockheed Martin Commercial Space Systems (LMCSS) using an A2100 AX platform, will weigh about 4,500 kg at launch. Equipped with 29 Ku-band active transponders and 2 Ka-band active transponders, Astra 1L will be positioned at 19.2 degrees East, and provide high-power satellite services across Europe. Its design life is approximately 15 years.

Galaxy 17, built by Thales Alenia Space using a Spacebus 3000 B3 platform, is designed to provide television and telephony services for North America. Weighing about 4,100 kg at launch, it is fitted with 24 Ku-band and 24 C-band transponders. Its design life is about 15 years.


Source: Arianespace Press Release

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#22    Waspie_Dwarf

Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 06 May 2007 - 12:34 AM

Ariane 5 second launch of six in 2007

5 May 2007

linked-image
On 4 May 2007, the second Ariane 5 launch of six in 2007 took place.

Credits: ESA/CNES/Arianespace - Photo Optique Vido CSG


On 4 May 2007, an Ariane 5 ECA launcher lifted off from Europes Spaceport in French Guiana on its mission to place two satellites into geostationary transfer orbits. Lift-off of flight V176 took place at 22:29 GMT/UTC (19:29 local time, 00:29 [5 May] CET/Paris). The satellites were accurately injected into the correct transfer orbits about 30 minutes later.

The payload comprised Astra 1L, a Ku- and Ka-band broadcast services satellite intended for direct-to-home transmissions over continental Europe, and Galaxy 17, a C- and Ku-band television and telephony services satellite that will serve North America. The payload mass was 9402 kg; the satellite masses totalled 8605 kg, with payload adapters and dispensers making up the additional 797 kg. This is a new record for Ariane 5 ECA

This second launch of the year keeps Arianespace and Europes Spaceport on target to perform six Ariane 5 launches in 2007 as they head towards their target of seven to eight missions per year from 2009.  

Flight timeline

The Ariane 5s cryogenic, liquid fuelled, main engine was ignited first. Seven seconds later, the solid fuel rocket boosters were also fired, and a fraction of a second after that, the launch vehicle lifted off.

The solid boosters were jettisoned 2min:20sec after main engine ignition, and the fairing protecting the payload during the climb through the Earths atmosphere was discarded at 3min:11sec. The launchers main engine was shut down at 8min:57sec; six seconds later the main cryogenic stage separated from the upper stage and its payload.

Four seconds after main stage separation, the engine of the launchers cryogenic upper stage was ignited to continue the journey. The upper stage engine was shut down at 24min:58sec into the flight, at which point the launch vehicle was travelling at 9878 metres per second (35 560 km/h) at an altitude of 622.6 kilometres and the conditions for geostationary transfer orbit injection had been achieved.

At 27min:15 sec after main engine ignition, Astra 1L separated from the launcher, followed by Galaxy 17 at 32min:54sec.


Ariane 5 ECA

Ariane 5 ECA is the latest version of the Ariane 5 launcher. It is designed to place payloads weighing up to 9.6 tonnes into geostationary transfer orbit. With its increased capacity Ariane 5 ECA can handle dual launches of very large satellites.


Source: ESA - News

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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