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Just How Far....?


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#1    mongoliandeathworm

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 11:21 AM

Looking at how far the new earth is away from us we found that it is 2,004,112,800,000 miles... whats this number when spoken??

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#2    The Mule

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 11:23 AM

20 light years

2 trillion 4 billion one hundred twelve million 800 thousand

Edited by The Mule, 27 April 2007 - 11:24 AM.

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#3    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 02:17 PM

I agree with The Mule on how to say the number but I am a bit puzzled as to where the number came from as it is a little under half a light year.

The new planet, Gliese 581c, is 20.5 light years away.

1 light year is 5.87849981 1012 miles or 5,874,998,100,000 (5 trillion, eight hundred billion, nine hundred and ninety eight million one hundred thousand miles).

That means Gliese 581c is 1.20509246 1014 miles miles from Earth. That is 120,509,246,000,000 (one hundred and twenty trillion, five hundred and nine billion, 246 million miles).

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#4    Legatus Legionis

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 06:43 PM

Quote

I agree with The Mule on how to say the number but I am a bit puzzled as to where the number came from as it is a little under half a light year.

The new planet, Gliese 581c, is 20.5 light years away.

1 light year is 5.87849981 1012 miles or 5,874,998,100,000 (5 trillion, eight hundred billion, nine hundred and ninety eight million one hundred thousand miles).

That means Gliese 581c is 1.20509246 1014 miles miles from Earth. That is 120,509,246,000,000 (one hundred and twenty trillion, five hundred and nine billion, 246 million miles).

so according to your calculations, it is much closer than what we think.?


#5    The Mule

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 06:47 PM

I just went by the OP as for how to say the number, and the 20 lights years from what i remembered reading in the article...

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#6    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 27 April 2007 - 07:01 PM

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so according to your calculations, it is much closer than what we think.?

No, the opposite. mongoliandeathworm's figure is 2 trillion miles and mine is 120 trillion miles. What I am saying is that is considerably further away than mongoliandeathworm thinks.

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I just went by the OP as for how to say the number, and the 20 lights years from what i remembered reading in the article...


I agreed 100% with your post, it is just the original post which is out by a large margin. That figure in miles is less that half a light year.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#7    MID

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 08:58 PM

Waspie is of course, correct.


This planet is 20.5 LY distant.  The figure that the OP gave in miles is incorrect by a factor of approximately 60 (in other words, this "new earth" is about 60 times farther away than the number the OP gave in his post).

This is, of course, cosmically close, but rediculously far away in a pragmatic sense.

At the speed of  Voyager 1,  the fastest moving man made object in deep space, as it traverses outward from the solar system, it will take it about 375,000 years to get as far away as Gliese 581c...


Cosmically, it's close, 20 years off at the speed of light is pretty close....but 15,000 generations will pass before Voyager 1 gets that far away.

Far it is....very, very far.




#8    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 12:26 AM

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Waspie is of course, correct.


The "of course" in this statement suggests you have far my faith in my mathematical abilities than I do. I checked the figures using a spread sheet. Then just to make sure I had done that correctly I checked the spread sheet results with a calculator. (It's probably a good thing that I can't remember where I put my slide rule otherwise I may have re-checked the calculator results using that).

Having spent a while doing this I then discovered that the very handy calculator function of Google will handle light years. Simply type in the search term "20.5 light years in miles," hit return and Google will do this for you:

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf, 29 April 2007 - 12:27 AM.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#9    adkchamp

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 06:48 AM

for some reason, i believe the world we're looking at is the world we live in but in 20.5 light years away. The universe is tricky science, many unknown elements can create delusion or even something we can't explain in our current language!


#10    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 09:39 AM

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for some reason, i believe the world we're looking at is the world we live in but in 20.5 light years away. The universe is tricky science, many unknown elements can create delusion or even something we can't explain in our current language!


This really makes no sense what so ever. Apart from anything else this planet is totally different from Earth, with a different type of star from the sun so how can it possibly be the same world we live on?

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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#11    Legatus Legionis

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 02:16 PM

on my google. there's no calculator anymore. how's this possible.. www.google.com.ph


#12    MID

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 10:18 PM

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The "of course" in this statement suggests you have far my faith in my mathematical abilities than I do. I checked the figures using a spread sheet. Then just to make sure I had done that correctly I checked the spread sheet results with a calculator. (It's probably a good thing that I can't remember where I put my slide rule otherwise I may have re-checked the calculator results using that).

Having spent a while doing this I then discovered that the very handy calculator function of Google will handle light years. Simply type in the search term "20.5 light years in miles," hit return and Google will do this for you:

linked-image



Cool, Waspie.

You're right...I do have faith in your mathematical abilities!

It's always a reliable number you put up...I usually just guess!!! w00t.gif


#13    MID

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Posted 30 April 2007 - 11:17 PM

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for some reason, i believe the world we're looking at is the world we live in but in 20.5 light years away. The universe is tricky science, many unknown elements can create delusion or even something we can't explain in our current language!



I must agree with Waspie (which is of course not too hard to do all the time... wink2.gif ).

Quote

This really makes no sense what so ever. Apart from anything else this planet is totally different from Earth, with a different type of star from the sun so how can it possibly be the same world we live on?


We do know some things about this planet, you know?

We know the following:


1)It's about 120 trillion miles away (i.e., out of reach).

2)It exists in a zone which makes its surface temperature range that in which liquid water could exist.

3) It's orbital period (year) is ~13 Earth days (~4% of an Earth year).

4) It's mass is likely in the range of 5 times that of Earth.

5) It's radius is probably 1.5 times that of Earth's.

6) It's gravity is between 1 1/4 and 2.2 g, depending on its composition (which is not known yet).

7)  It's approximately 4.4E9 years old.

8) It likely experiences tidal forces that are ~400 times stronger than the tidal forces of the Moon on the Earth, and it may in fact be tidally locked, with one hemisphere perpetually facing the star it orbits.

9) It is orbiting a star which is an M Class dwarf...at a distance of ~7 million miles.  (the Sun is a G Class star... a very different animal, which is of course located ~9.3E7 miles away from Earth (~13 times farther away that Gliese 381 c is from Gliese 381) .




There is alot we do not know about it, but from what we can ascertain through established astrophysical methodology, it should be apparent that this planet is not the Earth...whatsoever.


The science of this is somewhat complicated and , "tricky", as you say, but the science leads us to knowledge, not belief.  And, although we actually know very little about this planet, we do know that it is not the Earth in any way, shape, or form.  There is no delusion here, and we can explain some rudimentary information regarding this remarkable discovery in plain English.


It is not the Earth--20.5 LY away.  It is Gliese 581c, a very different place, whose only similarity to our world is in its calculated average surface temperature range.  


Beliefs about this obscure world are insignificant, and irrelevant to knowledge.  What is significant is the level to which astronomy has advanced to.


Want to be awed?

Rather than consider obscure beliefs, consider this:

We have derived this scientifically verifiable, although obviously rudimentary knowledge about a planet that is 20.5LY away from us.


That means that we have been able to gain what is actually substantial knowledge about a world which equates to an object the size of a pea...located approximately 400,000 miles away from the Earth.


Now that's something to be awed about!








#14    Lilly

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 01:59 AM

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Rather than consider obscure beliefs, consider this:

We have derived this scientifically verifiable, although obviously rudimentary knowledge about a planet that is 20.5LY away from us.
That means that we have been able to gain what is actually substantial knowledge about a world which equates to an object the size of a pea...located approximately 400,000 miles away from the Earth.
Now that's something to be awed about!


Well, it awes the hell outta me for sure. When I look *out there* at all the stars I can't help but wonder how many other worlds there might be. And naturally, I wonder if anyone is looking back wondering the exact same thing!


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#15    Waspie_Dwarf

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Posted 01 May 2007 - 02:06 AM

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Well, it awes the hell outta me for sure. When I look *out there* at all the stars I can't help but wonder how many other worlds there might be. And naturally, I wonder if anyone is looking back wondering the exact same thing!


For me there is only one thought that is more awe inspiring than the thought that we are not alone, and that is the thought that we might be.

"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

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