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How were the books of the Bible selected


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#1    keithisco

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 04:16 AM

I am aware that the books that are contained within the Bible as we know it, were selected in about 300 AD.
From an historical perspective, does anyone know why the books were either selected or rejected.
Does anyone know which books, accounts were rejected? This would be fascinating as they problem contain
alternative accounts - just guessing. Perhaps they were not of "high-enough" quality.

This a request that is purely historical in nature, not spiritual so I guess it belongs here.(Mods will tell me if they disagree)


#2    Pythia

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 12:25 AM

Great question!
I've actually seen a Bible from the 1800's that had more books (3 I think) than today's Bible. I can't remember what they were though. I'll call my friend and see if he still has it.


#3    Lt_Ripley

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 01:31 AM

the books were chosen to fit political and religious agenda's at the time. as are all .

Not all ancient Judeo-Christian texts made it into the Christian Bible. These ancient texts are called "outside books," "extrabiblical books," or "noncanonical books."

Christian canons emerged through a complex process in which some books were "chosen" and others were left out. A tradition of use, authority within the communities, antiquity or apostolicity, and orthodoxy were factors in deciding which books were "in" and which were "out."

Books became "outside" because:
Some ancient texts were considered authoritative but were dropped before the canon was "closed."
Some well-regarded books were written too late and/or not believed to be apostolic, so they were not included. Nevertheless some outside books, such as the Didache, are as old or even older than some of the books that made the New Testament.
Other books were accepted by some Christian communities but not others. Sometimes:
they were labeled "heretical" by more powerful Christian groups like Rome
they were not popular or known well enough by Greek-speaking Christians
Still other books never came close to making it "inside.". In addition to heretical books that were excluded, other books were considered to be too outrageous, even though they were very popular. (These books also tended to be written much later than canonical books)
A number of books were lost or destroyed.
Some old writers were never considered as scripture but have historical value; they may be letters, or histories, or stories, or other kinds of records.


http://gbgm-umc.org/umw/Bible/outside.stm



The big surprise in reading 100 Banned Books for me, at least, was to find that the sacred scriptures of three of the world's major religions have also been censored on religious grounds from time to time for one reason or another. They include The Talmud, The Bible, and The Koran. Censorship of The Talmud was initiated by the Catholic Church and it lasted for many centuries on the grounds of its perceived "blasphemy and immorality" (261). What may come as a real surprise is that the Bible itself was censored, also by the Catholic Church. The reasoning here may strike us as bordering on the irrational. What came under fire were translations of the Bible into the vernacular for fear the text might get corrupted or misinterpreted. The Catholic Church did not seem to stop and think about the fact that the Latin Vulgate it held officially acceptable was itself translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. In fact, the most shocking story in the suppression of translations of the Bible is the fate of William Tyndale, the first person to translate the Bible into English from the original Hebrew and Greek. "In a plot masterminded by English authorities, Tyndale was arrested by authorities in Antwerp, Belgium, tried for heresy and strangled and burned at the stake near Brussels in 1536 with copies of his Bible translation" (179).

http://www.stevencscheer.com/bannedbooks.htm


#4    Marvy

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 05:28 AM

Good question, im also interested with bible lately so i do a little research. The result i got leads to "Council of Nicea"


#5    keithisco

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 04:42 PM

Thanks Ripley ( or should that be LT Ripley). Great post, gives me a lot to look at.
I would be fascinated to actually read these books.
Thanks again, this is why I join these forums.


#6    Pandora7321

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Posted 01 June 2007 - 04:47 PM

Quote

the books were chosen to fit political and religious agenda's at the time. as are all .

Not all ancient Judeo-Christian texts made it into the Christian Bible. These ancient texts are called "outside books," "extrabiblical books," or "noncanonical books."

Christian canons emerged through a complex process in which some books were "chosen" and others were left out. A tradition of use, authority within the communities, antiquity or apostolicity, and orthodoxy were factors in deciding which books were "in" and which were "out."

Books became "outside" because:
Some ancient texts were considered authoritative but were dropped before the canon was "closed."
Some well-regarded books were written too late and/or not believed to be apostolic, so they were not included. Nevertheless some outside books, such as the Didache, are as old or even older than some of the books that made the New Testament.
Other books were accepted by some Christian communities but not others. Sometimes:
they were labeled "heretical" by more powerful Christian groups like Rome
they were not popular or known well enough by Greek-speaking Christians
Still other books never came close to making it "inside.". In addition to heretical books that were excluded, other books were considered to be too outrageous, even though they were very popular. (These books also tended to be written much later than canonical books)
A number of books were lost or destroyed.
Some old writers were never considered as scripture but have historical value; they may be letters, or histories, or stories, or other kinds of records.
http://gbgm-umc.org/umw/Bible/outside.stm
The big surprise in reading 100 Banned Books for me, at least, was to find that the sacred scriptures of three of the world's major religions have also been censored on religious grounds from time to time for one reason or another. They include The Talmud, The Bible, and The Koran. Censorship of The Talmud was initiated by the Catholic Church and it lasted for many centuries on the grounds of its perceived "blasphemy and immorality" (261). What may come as a real surprise is that the Bible itself was censored, also by the Catholic Church. The reasoning here may strike us as bordering on the irrational. What came under fire were translations of the Bible into the vernacular for fear the text might get corrupted or misinterpreted. The Catholic Church did not seem to stop and think about the fact that the Latin Vulgate it held officially acceptable was itself translated from the original Hebrew and Greek. In fact, the most shocking story in the suppression of translations of the Bible is the fate of William Tyndale, the first person to translate the Bible into English from the original Hebrew and Greek. "In a plot masterminded by English authorities, Tyndale was arrested by authorities in Antwerp, Belgium, tried for heresy and strangled and burned at the stake near Brussels in 1536 with copies of his Bible translation" (179).

http://www.stevencscheer.com/bannedbooks.htm


Excellent answer. I was wondering that myself. I've read here and there and seen the shows on the history channel, but you've summed it up quite nicely.


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#7    Calista

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Posted 02 June 2007 - 07:04 PM

Fascinating.   I always find it amazing on how the Dead Sea Scrolls survived.  How many other books are out there and remain lost forever or are yet to be discovered?





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