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Crippled moose has a real knack at survival

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A crippled cow moose in west Anchorage is showing such a knack for survival that state biologists have so far avoided the normal course of putting her down.

The moose, which is missing about 12 inches of its right hind leg, is also nursing what appears to be a large and healthy calf, according to Rick Sinnott, the state's Anchorage-area wildlife biologist.

"She seems to be getting around fairly well on three legs, although she's a little skinnier than she should be this time of year," Sinnott said. "A complicating factor is she still has a calf and, the last time we looked, the calf was still nursing."

Moose typically loose weight during the winter because they have less food to eat, and it may be necessary to put the moose down then, said Jessy Coltrane, the assistant Anchorage-area biologist.

"There's no need (now) for a pre-emptive strike," Coltrane said. "Her body condition looks good."

Many concerned residents phone the Department of Fish and Game to report seeing the three-legged moose, which may have been injured in a vehicle collision sometime this year, biologists said.

The crippled moose in West Anchorage apparently also has drawn the attention of bulls and biologists speculate that she could mate again.

Biologists know of a cow moose in Eagle River several years ago that was missing an entire rear leg and yet produced calves for several years running, Coltrane said.

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Information from: Anchorage Daily News, http://www.adn.com

:wub: I really wish her and baby well and hope they won,t have to put her down! :tu:

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Thats great!

Animals are stronger and more determined then we give them credit for..

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Posted (edited)

If she seems to be getting along o.k, why would they consider putting her down in the Winter...as long as she is healthy, there would be the same amount of food, whether she has 3 or 4 legs...Quite a survivor and very "motherly" :yes:

Edited by goalienan

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Amazing that she can breed, quite frankly. That's a lot of force to be holding up with one rear leg.

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Amazing that she can breed, quite frankly. That's a lot of force to be holding up with one rear leg.

I have to say that she could have bred before she lost the leg. The trauma quite possibly could have caused a miscarriage, but what's saying that she lost the leg but kept the calf?

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Amazing that she can breed, quite frankly. That's a lot of force to be holding up with one rear leg.

they can lay down and mate you know, doggy she doesn't have to be standing. Oh and yes they are very strong so as long as she's bringing up her calf let her. She might die during the winter but her calf may live. Kill her now and they both will die.

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Posted (edited)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A crippled cow moose in west Anchorage is showing such a knack for survival that state biologists have so far avoided the normal course of putting her down.

The moose, which is missing about 12 inches of its right hind leg, is also nursing what appears to be a large and healthy calf, according to Rick Sinnott, the state's Anchorage-area wildlife biologist.

...

Moose typically loose weight during the winter because they have less food to eat, and it may be necessary to put the moose down then, said Jessy Coltrane, the assistant Anchorage-area biologist.

"There's no need (now) for a pre-emptive strike," Coltrane said. "Her body condition looks good."

...

Biologists know of a cow moose in Eagle River several years ago that was missing an entire rear leg and yet produced calves for several years running, Coltrane said.

So the common procedure in the case of a wild animal (not feral) with a non-lethal injury that is otherwise healthy is to put the animal down rather than letting nature take its course? This seems to go against nearly everything that wildlife biologists stand for, particularly because there have been worse cases that have shown that survival - and perhaps one could even use the word "thrive" - of an animal with a similar, potentially even more drastic injury is possible, even probable?

Edited by The Little Raven

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