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Potholer

Brown's Gas

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Hey all

I'm reading a book at the moment called "The Atlantis Blueprint" by Rand Flem-Ath and Colin Wilson, in which it mentions this amazingly incredible gas named "Brown's Gas"

According to the book, it is a gas which is made by combining hydrogen and oxygen in the same proportion as it is joined in water - two parts hydrogen, one part oxygen - which means that it doesn't explode. They implode instead. It was made/discovered/created by a US intellegence man by the name of Yull Brown, who's real name was Ilya Velbov, born in 1922.

Apparently, the gas can put holes in wood and tungsten. At one point it says that they (a man named Montgomery who owned a 'Brown's Gas Generator', and Flem-Ath) "welded a piece of glass to a piece of brick, then a piece of copper to the brick, then a piece of glass to the copper, then cut holes in a fire-brick - designed to withstand high temperatures - and also welded copper to it. They turned a fistful of sand into a glass ball, then welded together samples of dissimilar metals, such as copper and bronze, and nickel and iron. Finally, they turned various metals into molten pools"

And back to how the gas is made -

"When the two gases are recombined with a spark, the result is not an explosion but an implosion. That is, they combine to make water which occupies a far smaller volume, and if the reaction occurs in a closed vessel also creates a vacuum. When Brown passed these gases through a nozzle and lit them ... the result was an almost colourless flame that burned at a temperature of around 130 degrees celcius, slightly hotter than boiling water, so that it can be wafted up and down someone's arm without any discomfort. Yet when applied to Tungsten, which melts at 3000 degrees celcius, it simply vaporises it.

"... The flame is not merely heating the material; it is reacting with it. Instead of simply heating to 130 degrees celcius, the temperature of the tungsten is soaring until it vaporises. One suggestion offered by scientists who witnessed the reaction is that Brown's Gas keeps oxygen and hydrogen in their atomic state, that is, as single atoms, instead of allowing them to combine into molecules of O2 and H2. Even if that proves to be correct, it is still hard to see why the flame made of atoms rather than molecules should make the substances to which it is applied behave so unaccountably."

"... If a flame that burns at around 130 degrees celcius can punch holes in a firebrick and vaporise tungsten, then the laws of nature are, at the very least, not as straightforward as we assumed. ...It looks as if the Brown's Gas flame can somehow 'take account' of the substance it is heating, which sounds more like medieval alchemy than the chemistry we are taught at school."

It also goes on to say that it can detoxify waste, taking the radiation of Americanum from 16,000 curies of radiation per minute, down to 100 curies per minute - about the same level as low-level background radiation.

My questions to all of you are, has anyone ever heard of this miracle gas? What are your opinions on it? Is it a hoax (beasue you never know with these things)?

And if this stuff is so incredibly amazing, why the hell isn't Brown hailed all over the world for his incredible achievement??

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do a google on it, it appears to be real, and used in welding.

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Good call Bathory - there is quite a bit out there on it! As you said it is a welding technique, nothing magical about it! thumbsup.gif

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