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Dante's Inferno

Hajar el Gouble-The stone of the South

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I'm currently researching the temple of Baalbek in Lebanon. And I'm interested in other people opinions about the site. For example along side the existing Roman temple ruins there is a pre-roman site parts of this site are constructed using huge megalithic blocks. Most Archeologists view these meagalithic blocks and their construction alongside others from around the world such as Stonehenge. However one block called the Hajar el Gouble has some unbelievable dimensions! The Hajar el Gouble or stone of the south is sixty nine feet by sixteen feet by thirteen feet ten inches it weighs and estimated 12000 tons! making it the largest single peice of stonework ever crafted in the World! How did an ancient civilization craft this and move it?Even today with with all of our accumulated tecnological knowledge moving and lifting this block is impossible! There is no flat surface to roll the block like other civilizations did so how was it done? I have become fascinated with this and would like to hear others opinions.

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Maybe the stone has always been where it is now and they just shaped it as it lay.

Avs

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Maybe the stone has always been where it is now and they just shaped it as it lay.

Avs

I thought of that too but there are many huge megalithic stones at this site the stone of the south is just the biggest! Archeologists have suggested that the stone of the south has been carved out of the rock ready to be moved but they never moved it even if this is correct how could they move these huge stones around and then lift them about three feet hugh to become part of the wall. Some have suggested that even the most technologically advancedcranes could not do this today

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I thought of that too but there are many huge megalithic stones at this site the stone of the south is just the biggest! Archeologists have suggested that the stone of the south has been carved out of the rock ready to be moved but they never moved it even if this is correct how could they move these huge stones around and then lift them about three feet hugh to become part of the wall. Some have suggested that even the most technologically advancedcranes could not do this today

Chop several trees down

form into smooth rollers.

Place in a line... topple megalith onto rollers.

As for lifting them.... VERY gently sloping ramps.

Meow Purr.

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However one block called the Hajar el Gouble has some unbelievable dimensions! The Hajar el Gouble or stone of the south is sixty nine feet by sixteen feet by thirteen feet ten inches it weighs and estimated 12000 tons! making it the largest single peice of stonework ever crafted in the World! How did an ancient civilization craft this and move it?Even today with with all of our accumulated tecnological knowledge moving and lifting this block is impossible! There is no flat surface to roll the block like other civilizations did so how was it done?

You haven't quite got your facts straight, which is not to detract from the truly impressive history of the Baalbek site.

The stone itself lies where it was carved. It was never moved, and only (ha ha - "only") weighs 1,000 tonnes, not 12,000 as you state.

So I guess it was made in much the same way as any other carved piece, only on a bigger scale.

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From wiki:

The Roman construction was built on top of earlier ruins and involved the creation of an immense raised plaza onto which the actual buildings were placed. The sloping terrain necessitated the creation of retaining walls on the north, south and west sides of the plaza. These walls are built of monoliths at their lowest level each weighing approximately 400 tons. The western, tallest retaining wall has a second course of monoliths containg the famous "trilithon"; a row of three stones each weighing in excess of 1000 tons. A fourth, still larger stone called "the stone of the south" (Hajar el Gouble) or "the stone of the pregnant woman" (Hajar el Hibla) lays unused in a nearby quarry. Had it been freed from the quarry, it would have been the largest stone ever moved, larger than the famous unfinished obelisk in Aswan. Another of the Roman ruins, the Great Court, has six 20 m-tall stone columns surviving, out of an original 128

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You haven't quite got your facts straight, which is not to detract from the truly impressive history of the Baalbek site.

The stone itself lies where it was carved. It was never moved, and only (ha ha - "only") weighs 1,000 tonnes, not 12,000 as you state.

So I guess it was made in much the same way as any other carved piece, only on a bigger scale.

Another even larger stone lies in a limestone quarry a quarter of a mile from the Baalbek complex. Weighing an estimated 1200 tons, it is sixty-nine feet by sixteen feet by thirteen feet ten inches, making it the single largest piece of stonework ever crafted in the world. Called the Hajar el Gouble, the Stone of the South, or the Hajar el Hibla, the Stone of the Pregnant Woman, it lays at a raised angle with the lowest part of its base still attached to the quarry rock as though it were almost ready to be cut free and transported to its presumed location next to the other stones of the Trilithon- sorry i missed typed I meant 1200 tons!

Edited by Dante's Inferno

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Chop several trees down

form into smooth rollers.

Place in a line... topple megalith onto rollers.

As for lifting them.... VERY gently sloping ramps.

Meow Purr.

sorry not a good explanation wny? beacuse all of the surrounding area is rough and on an incline can't use rollers then! How aout lifting a 1200 ton block of Granite on a gently sloping ramp 3 feet up I find this highly skeptical!

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There are so many discussions like this already about moving huge stones. All you need to know is they did it, and they were great at it. For some reason we don't know everything about our human history. There is so much we don't know, I would estimate that we don't know 75% of our history as humans since we became homo sapiens, maybe even more. No one will ever get to the bottom of this unless we find a guide book or guide stone on how they did it. I guess they didin't think to write it down or chisel it out, because it was probably something learned, passed down through the generations. We're so used to having computers and books and things like Google to go to, we forget that our ancestors had to just know everything, they had to just know math and be able to figure it out in their heads, they would memorize huge stories, almost like memorizing the dictionary. To have all that learned knowledge is just something we are poor at comprehending. So let's remember how intelligent and amazing our ancestors were and just look at what they did in awe, instead of trying to figure it out, because we won't figure it out.

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The stones were moved downhill to the site.

This was done, by the way, by the Romans. Baalbek is a Roman construction from the bedrock all the way up.

Nothing particularly mysterious about it, though if you didn't know that, there are plenty of con men out there trying to sell books to you that claim otherwise.

Harte

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Too bad you're all "scrupulous" and stuff, Harte. You could make a fortune with your own book.

--Jaylemurph

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Too bad you're all "scrupulous" and stuff, Harte. You could make a fortune with your own book.

--Jaylemurph

You got me!

My real name is David Icke. :blush:

Ickharte

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I'm currently researching the temple of Baalbek in Lebanon. And I'm interested in other people opinions about the site. For example along side the existing Roman temple ruins there is a pre-roman site parts of this site are constructed using huge megalithic blocks. Most Archeologists view these meagalithic blocks and their construction alongside others from around the world such as Stonehenge. However one block called the Hajar el Gouble has some unbelievable dimensions! The Hajar el Gouble or stone of the south is sixty nine feet by sixteen feet by thirteen feet ten inches it weighs and estimated 12000 tons! making it the largest single peice of stonework ever crafted in the World! How did an ancient civilization craft this and move it?Even today with with all of our accumulated tecnological knowledge moving and lifting this block is impossible! There is no flat surface to roll the block like other civilizations did so how was it done? I have become fascinated with this and would like to hear others opinions.

post-44578-1193724836_thumb.jpg

This could easily be moved today, using oak timbers and leavers it could be raised to any height.

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Chop several trees down

form into smooth rollers.

Place in a line... topple megalith onto rollers.

As for lifting them.... VERY gently sloping ramps.

Meow Purr.

u r correct!

Thats the way they moved huge monoliths used for temple construction in ancient india...the carvings of the temples even proves it...no leviation no insitu concreting of granite..hehehe! it wqas also shown on discovery channel also!

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You got me!

My real name is David Icke. :blush:

Ickharte

Hmmmm..where are ur reptilian buddies!! :P

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Hmmmm..where are ur reptilian buddies!! :P

I ate them in a moment of weakness.

You know, it's been thousands of years since my planet came around here where all the hot meat is.

Sitcharte

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