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NeoGenesis

Mysteries of the Bermuda-Triangle

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Can somebody give me a complete answer about the stories about the Bermuda-Triangle.I mean what is the mechanism that is driving the storms and the mysteries around the triangle.And to make matters even more difficult I watched a documentary on the history channel that it was found that there was another triangle on the same longitude and latetude but on the other side of the earth.

For example the story about the lost Allied fleet of 1939 (correct me if I am wrong).

Forth I am still searching,trying to find answers.

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one theory is that passing through it will warp you to a higher frequency (aka different plane/dimension ?)

No idea what it really is tho,its just a theory which may sound possible (tho doubtful)

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Here is my fav site about the Bermuda Triangle. One of the more startling disapearances in the Bermuda Triangle is Flight 19.

Bermuda Triangle.org

No doubt you have wondered about the Bermuda Triangle. It is the greatest

modern mystery of our supposedly well understood world: a region of the Atlantic

Ocean between Bermuda, Miami, Florida, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, where

disappearances of ships and planes not only continue but continue to defy explanation.

A real search for an answer must follow the path upon which the evidence leads one. For the Triangle, this path takes us on an unnerving odyssey through fascinating concepts, from deep below the ocean to far out in space, from high in the atmosphere to the very zero-point of existence, from the complex makeup of this huge planet to the smallest particles of existence.

The paradoxes do not cease—the outback nature of the Triangle leads us to the prehistoric past and the rise of the civilization of mankind. And to answer what happened to very tangible ships and planes, we must even consider the opposite: the science behind “clairvoyance” and if the predictions about the Bermuda Triangle long before it became a concept have any merits.

No matter which theory one decides to tackle, the path weaves many of them together in a cunning way. In the end, one can truly wonder, are these theories really the cause, or are they only the symptoms of something that lies deeper down? These few links only give you a small foretaste of what is in Gian Quasar’s new book Into The Bermuda Triangle

Links

linked-image

If you are interested in reading about all this, this web site provides dozens of pages to whet your appetite. Investigations gives you detailed investigations into some of the more interesting and provocative cases and, of course, profiles most any incident, old and new.

linked-image

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I believe the Triangle to be the area above the lost city of Atlantis.

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Thanks.This has really help me put some perspective on this subject because I was so misguided by all these other stories about the Bermuda-Triangle.

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The modern legend of the Bermuda Triangle began soon after five Navy planes [Flight 19] vanished on a training mission during a severe storm in 1945. The most logical theory as to why they vanished is that lead pilot Lt. Charles Taylor’s compass failed. The trainees' planes were not equipped with working navigational instruments. The group was disoriented and simply, though tragically, ran out of fuel. No mysterious forces were likely to have been involved other than the mysterious force of gravity on planes with no fuel. It is true that one of the rescue planes blew up shortly after take-off, but this was likely due to a faulty gas tank rather than to any mysterious forces.

Over the years there have been dozens of articles, books, and television programs promoting the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle. In his study of this material, Larry Kusche found that few did any investigation into the mystery. Rather, they passed on the speculations of their predecessors as if they were passing on the mantle of truth. Of the many uncritical accounts of the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle, perhaps no one has done more to create this myth than Charles Berlitz, who had a bestseller on the subject in 1974. After examining the 400+ page official report of the Navy Board of Investigation of the disappearance of the Navy planes in 1945, Kusche found that the Board wasn't baffled at all by the incident and did not mention alleged radio transmissions cited by Berlitz in his book. According to Kusche, what isn't misinterpreted by Berlitz is fabricated. Kusche writes: "If Berlitz were to report that a boat were red, the chance of it being some other color is almost a certainty." (Berlitz, by the way, did not invent the name; that was done by Vincent Gaddis in "The Deadly Bermuda Triangle," which appeared in the February, 1964, issue of Argosy, a magazine devoted to fiction.)

In short, the mystery of the Bermuda Triangle became a mystery by a kind of communal reinforcement among uncritical authors and a willing mass media to uncritically pass on the speculation that something mysterious is going on in the Atlantic.

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I don't know much about the modern mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle, but it is thought that the island in the Shakespeare play The Tempest was based on Bermuda, which Had been recently discovered. In the Tempest the storm, which mysteriously wrecks the ship was caused by the magician Prospero. No, I don't really think that any of the disappearances in that area have been caused by a 400 year old magician, but it's an interesting coincidence that Shakespeare used that island. I wonder if there had been any strange occurances there in his day or if he just used an island that, because it was so far away and unexplored seemed exotic and magical to his audience.

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Watched a documentary on the effects of methane gas pockets and internal combustion engines in flight...as well as the effects on buoyancy losses due to large methane gas releases under boats.

Was quite interesting how little methane it actually took to cut out the engines.

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Google Parapsychology .. Timeslip phenomena and then put 2 and 1 together.

The answer is odd, but so is the Bermuda-Triangle

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I personally like to thank every one who has posted explanations to my topic you all have been of a great help.Sorry I could not make the topic a bit more interesting in the beginning.

Best regards to all. :D

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I personally like to thank every one who has posted explanations to my topic you all have been of a great help.Sorry I could not make the topic a bit more interesting in the beginning.

Best regards to all. :D

Of course there is the theory that the Bermuda Triangle is just an area of high traffic with highly variable weather conditions. Seems boring, but squint at that when you're a little more credulous than average and -- Ta-Da! -- an unsolved mystery.

--Jaylemurph

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here's another theory for you NeoGenesis. i know it doesn't really account for radar problems and the like, but one of the explanations i've heard is that it's simply because the islands in and around it look so similar.

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Posted (edited)

I don't know much about the modern mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle, but it is thought that the island in the Shakespeare play The Tempest was based on Bermuda, which Had been recently discovered. In the Tempest the storm, which mysteriously wrecks the ship was caused by the magician Prospero. No, I don't really think that any of the disappearances in that area have been caused by a 400 year old magician, but it's an interesting coincidence that Shakespeare used that island. I wonder if there had been any strange occurances there in his day or if he just used an island that, because it was so far away and unexplored seemed exotic and magical to his audience.

apparently Shakespeare was heavily involved in the 'London Virginia Company.' you know, a trading company...plantations, slaves, commodities etc.

Just think 'the bad guys in Pirates of the Carribean' and your'e on the right tracks...

does the subtext of The Tempest include such themes that would have relevance to this....? Yes.

Is Prospero the 'cause' of the Bermuda triangle? .... No.....did he cause the 'Tempest' ? No.

The area is known for its storms, but this alone is not justification for 'the Tempest' nor is it an attempt at explaining a 'bermuda triangle' phenomenon.

Its a surprisingly worthwhile read if you ever get the opportunity.

about 150 British travelers were blown off course by a hurricane and shipwrecked (1609–10) at Bermuda, which they named the Somers Isles. News of these events inspired Shakespeare's writing of The Tempest (1611–12); in the play Ariel makes reference to “the still-vex'd Bermoothes.” Bermuda was included (1612) in the third charter of the Virginia Company, and 60 English settlers were sent to colonize the islands. Indian and African slaves were transported to Bermuda by 1617, and soon the slave population outnumbered the white settlers.

http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-8207/...uda#160860.hook

Edited by lil gremlin

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Google 'electronic fog'.

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It's also said that the Bermuda Triangle and The Dragon's Triangle are the only two places where magnetic north and north are the same.

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It's also said that the Bermuda Triangle and The Dragon's Triangle are the only two places where magnetic north and north are the same.

Strange ^_^.Because the documentary I saw on the History channel explains that these triangles are places of magnetic turmoil. ;)

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I know its only Wiki but....

In popular culture, especially in the United States, the Devil's Sea is widely believed to be, together with the Bermuda Triangle, an area where ships and planes are said to disappear under mysterious circumstances. The Japanese, on the other hand, do not consider the Devil's Sea to be more mysterious or dangerous than other coastal waters of Japan.

Contrary to several claims, neither the Devil's Sea nor the Bermuda Triangle is located on the agonic line, where the magnetic north equals the geographic north. The magnetic declination in this area is about 6°.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devil's_Sea

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No one is certain on what happened in the bermuda triangle.

SOme say its the increase in magnetisim.

Another theory is that ufos r sinking the planes and ships,

and another wacky idea is that it acts like a portal, once u cross the triangles path u teleport to a place in Japan.

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No one is certain on what happened in the bermuda triangle.

SOme say its the increase in magnetisim.

Another theory is that ufos r sinking the planes and ships,

and another wacky idea is that it acts like a portal, once u cross the triangles path u teleport to a place in Japan.

HAHA LOL.We give you the fastest travel known to man,from New York to Tokyo in the blink of an eye. :P

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HAHA LOL.We give you the fastest travel known to man,from New York to Tokyo in the blink of an eye. :P

Yup all u have to do is risk ur life and belongings and........pop..............ull be eating sushi before u know it:L

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Yup all u have to do is risk ur life and belongings and........pop..............ull be eating sushi before u know it:L

Rolling On Ground Laughing :lol:.

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Rolling On Ground Laughing :lol:.

SO does that help explain ur theory, time travilling portals??? :P

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apparently Shakespeare was heavily involved in the 'London Virginia Company.' you know, a trading company...plantations, slaves, commodities etc.

Just think 'the bad guys in Pirates of the Carribean' and your'e on the right tracks...

I'm not aware of /any/ active involvement by Shakespeare with the Virginia Company -- the closet link I know of is that the Shakespeare's patron (and possible lover) Henry Wriothesley, 2nd Earl of Southampton was an investor in the company. Shakespeare wasn't a particularly rich man, and the only record we have of Shakespeare actually investing in in his own Company.

I don't doubt he had heard of the wreck of the Sea-Venture, but sea wrecks are a long-standing part of his work, from the beginning of his career (and an inheritance of Greek and Roman plays). Furthermore, he would likely have been just as aware of the failures of the Roanoke colonies, especially the 1585 one.

--Jaylemurph

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Posted (edited)

does the subtext of The Tempest include such themes that would have relevance to this....? Yes.

Is Prospero the 'cause' of the Bermuda triangle? .... No.....did he cause the 'Tempest' ? No.

The area is known for its storms, but this alone is not justification for 'the Tempest' nor is it an attempt at explaining a 'bermuda triangle' phenomenon.

But, as we all know, Shakespeare based "The Tempest" on "Forbidden Planet," where Robbie the Robot and Dr. Morbius (along with a nubile skinnydipping daughter) lived and worked after the expedition that brought them there died of mysterious causes.

Harte

Edited by Harte

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Posted (edited)

http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/10/...6631498889.html

Bermuda Triangle mystery solved? It's a load of gas

By Jason Dowling

October 23, 2003

Massive gas bubbles rising from the sea floor may be capable of sinking ships and could explain the disappearance of a vessel in a North Sea "Bermuda Triangle", Melbourne researchers have concluded.

In a report published in the September issue of the American Journal of Physics, Monash University's Professor Joseph Monaghan and honours student David May said that a trawler discovered resting in a large methane crater off the east coast of Scotland may have been sunk by a huge gas bubble. The possibly lethal gas bubbles are created by underwater deposits of methane that have built up over thousands of years.

"It's long been known that there are pockets of methane gas, known as methane gas hydrates, beneath the ocean floor that could erupt if they're disturbed or if their internal pressure becomes too large," Professor Monaghan said.

The massive gas bubbles had the potential to cause aircraft to crash, Mr May said yesterday. "In the Bermuda Triangle, methane gas is known to be present and the release of that gas could cause not only boats to sink, as shown in our study, but also aeroplanes to crash," he said. The gas could cause an explosion if it came in contact with the hot engine of a plane.

Oil-drilling platforms are aware of the dangers of ocean floor gas bubbles and have safety procedures to follow if they hit a methane pocket. But the discovery of the fishing trawler in the North Sea suggests that not all vessels were as well prepared. Sonar surveys of the ocean floor 150 kilometres east of Scotland have revealed high levels of methane and gas eruption sites. At a site known as the Witch's Hole, a documentary film crew in 2000 discovered a wreck resting in the centre of an underwater crater, likely caused by a huge methane gas release. The wreck was a 22-metre, steel-hulled fishing trawler, built between 1890 and 1930. The trawler was relatively undamaged and was horizontal on the sea bed.

From laboratory experiments, the Monash University researchers were able to conclude that large gas bubbles, theoretically, had the ability to sink ships. "It is quite possible that the trawler languishing in Witch's Hole was sunk by a bubble with a radius equal to or bigger than the trawler's hull," Professor Monaghan said.

Mr May said they had made a small perspex boat and conducted a number of experiments examining how the size of the bubble related to the size and position of the boat.

They found that if a ship was directly above a gas bubble it was relatively safe, but a vessel on the edge or in the trough of a bubble may be swamped.

"The sinking occurs because a mound of water is raised above the region where the bubble reaches the surface," Professor Monaghan said.

"The flow from the mound creates a deep trough on each side of the mound, and the flow from the mound carries the boat into the trough."

Then you have the Glomar Challenger drilling platform hitting a Methane Hydrate pocket in 1981 and almost sinking as a result. Total loss of buoyancy in but a few minutes

Edited by MolonLabe

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