Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
Socol

Mysterious Mass Disappearences

27 posts in this topic

I believe this topic has been touched before but what do you think about this event?

Mysterious Mass Disappearences

By the way, this reminds me of the movie "Phantoms".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read the book "Phantoms" by Dean Koontz right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dissaperances, have always interested me in a great way, as long as it dosent happen to me... but some are hoax and some i believe to be true.. But when you dissapear the question is where do you go! what happens to you? do you come back? and do you remember what happened to you while you were gone? there are soo many questions dealing with strange dissaperances, i wish there was a lot of anwsers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fink peepol go back to skool...and its an inglish lessan...and all the peepol are blank and hate there teecher and dont lissen to what they arr tort.

Vimjams

ph34r.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I fink peepol go back to skool...and its an inglish lessan...and all the peepol are blank and hate there teecher and dont lissen to what they arr tort.

Yeah what he said^^

Note: I did have to "read" it a few times tongue.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my dad is a huge baseball fan, old school baseball rather, but anyways, he was tellin me i think 1929 a great and famous baseball player got on this train that had no stops, and the train left and he got on, then it stopped at the station and he never got off!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Whitley Strieber, in his book Majestic, states: "A check with the records department indicated that the matter remains unsolved, and despite a search of the whole of Canada and inquiries throughout the world, not a single trace of the missing twelve hundred men, women and children were ever found."

Actually, a search with the records department of the Royal Mounted Canadian Police shows that there was no disappearance or, for that matter, no village to begin with. There was, however, a very imaginative author by the name of Frank Edwards who fabricated this story for the book he was writing.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police: Anjikuni

This is pretty much the same with any mass disappearance that comes up. They are simply wild stories with little basis in fact, spread by people with more interest in mysteries than explanations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you see that's what started the stupid"Aliens Exist" thing and the whole deal with they come to earth just to kill us and that crap!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i remember in school learning about i thiknk in cuba how thousands of prisoners started vanshing...im sure it more to o with a crrupt gov than aleins..also there are many cases of people dying and not being found for years one case was an old man died sitting on his ouch..he was not found for 18 years!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i remember in school learning about i thiknk in cuba how thousands of prisoners started vanshing...im sure it more to o with a crrupt gov than aleins..also there are many cases of people dying and not being found for years one case was an old man died sitting on his ouch..he was not found for 18 years!!! talk abou the TV bill!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*qoute* I fink peepol go back to skool...and its an inglish lessan...and all the peepol are blank and hate there teecher and dont lissen to what they arr tort.

Vimjams

I acutally understood that scary!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been interested in this topic for a very long time.And when I bought myself a copy of Dean Koontz's book "Phantoms", I just went over the moon because he mentiones some of history's most mysterious cases of mass disappearances.These recollections are very real though, not a figment of anyone's imagination.Then a few years after that I happened to come across a copy of Marilyn Harris's "The Portent'.This book ellaborates on a theory called the HE Theory.Meaning the Hostile Earth Theory.What it basically says is that because of human error, nature herself is reacting in ways that ensures retaliation every time damage is done to earth, whether it is pollution, toxic spillages or just mentioning that things will be done in future which will bring harm on nature. To conclude it generally implies that humans pay dearly for mistakes made by them or other humans.One then comes to the conclusion that things such as driftsand,tsunamis,hurricanes, whirlpools and earthquakes are some of the mechanisms used by nature to punish humans for their irresponsible behaviour. :ph34r:

Farfetched, I know but it does make you wonder... :no:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beside disappearances there have been cases of people appearing out of other times obviously quite confused. Also people have been somehow transported in an instant across the globe with verifyable witnesses on both ends.user posted image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you mind recounting some of the cases you know of, Twitch98, I mean where people have appeared? What would be really sweet is if we could get a specialist to explain this to us.Do any of u know how we can make that happen?It would answer a lot of our questions!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Show me a case study, and I'll show you a good opinion on the matter.

And a video where a bunch of people saying they appeared out of nowhere with spooky background music isn't a case study, it's bulls***. Try to get something from a recognized scientific organization, like a reknowned university or research center. And any group containing the words "christian", "jewish" or any religious denominant in their name is not eligible as a serious scientific organization.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Show me a case study, and I'll show you a good opinion on the matter.

And a video where a bunch of people saying they appeared out of nowhere with spooky background music isn't a case study, it's bulls***. Try to get something from a recognized scientific organization, like a reknowned university or research center. And any group containing the words "christian", "jewish" or any religious denominant in their name is not eligible as a serious scientific organization.

It does not matter who it comes from or who you see as "credible", as that's mostly subjective anyway. What matters is the data itself and if that data is correct, nothing more, nothing less. Wouldn't matter if the data came from a hobo on the street and was never peer reviewed, if that data is posted somewhere like.. let's say, the internet, and it's valid, then it's just as good as a peer reviewed study done by a scientist.

Edited by Zero of Deism

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with you. What I mean is that mister hobo on the street is better known for making up sh** as he goes than making sense.

A bad scientific organization will ignore certain results and variables in order to get their results to fit with what they want to be true. And when simply being told what was determined, you do not know how research was conducted. In that case, you're better off listening to Harvard than to mister Hobo. But if mister Hobo come with concluant data and well conducted experiments, then he'll have voice over Harvard.

As of yet, all I see is mister Hobo rambling. I'll give it a closer look when I'm not so damn tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shannon I gotta dig out my old books and look for some of that stuff.

If we have the quandry of the hobo versus the Harvard guy society will believe the Havard guy simply because we've been conditioned to have faith in some obscure superior intellect. We could have an event where the hobo saw an anomaly of some sort, fill in the blank. We would discount his statement and believe the Harvard guy who explains why it's not possible for the hobo to have experienced what he did. THAT'S how screwed up we are because we over-ANALyze everything. We take on the role prosecuting attorney in an effort to weigh the credability of the hobo projecting some fictional scenario to the legal system. We conclude that the hobo lacks credability due to his station in life and the Harvard dude who is simply tap dancing real fast to push through his version of reality gets the nod as believable. It's not simply being skeptical, it's turning off your mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about the Bermuda Triangle? The "Mary Rose"? The Philadelphia Experiment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember when i was younger reading a story about some WW1 brigade or battalion disappearing right on the battle feild in smoke and fog,,also Roanoak comes to mind. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember when i was younger reading a story about some WW1 brigade or battalion disappearing right on the battle feild in smoke and fog,,also Roanoak comes to mind. :)

Your'e talking about the 'Angel of Mons" affair that took place on 26/8/14.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We conclude that the hobo lacks credability due to his station in life and the Harvard dude who is simply tap dancing real fast to push through his version of reality gets the nod as believable. It's not simply being skeptical, it's turning off your mind.

Only if you do it for the reasons that you pointed out above. If, on the other hand, you use your skeptical abilities and realize that the probability of the Harvard 'dude' actually having studied and learned about different sorts of phenomena that can result in the effect that the hobo reports are quite high, then it is not turning off your mind, but rather understanding that what Harvard offers is generally of a higher caliber, meaning that it contains far more research, logic, and reason, by virtue of being Harvard material (It is, after all, not merely a title handed out for nothing), as opposed to the hobo.

What about the Bermuda Triangle? The "Mary Rose"? The Philadelphia Experiment?

The Bermuda triangle is a non-mystery, in that it is essentially a created mystery done by exaggerating actual incidents, incompletely reporting other incidents, and outright fabricating more than a few incidents. When looked at in context, one realizes that the Bermuda Triangle region is actually the single most heavily traveled region near the U.S., with literally hundreds of flights and ships traversing through it on a daily basis. It is also the primary training ground for the U.S. Navy. If looked at statistically, there should actually be far more incidents than there actually are, due to the heavy traffic, but because of the heavy traffic, the area is more closely monitored than normal, and thus there are actually less incidents than normal. The "Mary Rose" and the Phildelphia Experiment, again, are also incidents that, upon stripping away the exagerration and embossements, become somewhat more banal.

I remember when i was younger reading a story about some WW1 brigade or battalion disappearing right on the battle feild in smoke and fog,,also Roanoak comes to mind. :)

Right, the Battle of Mons. The thing about this, again, is context. After the battle, the clean-up involved the logging of around 12,000 individual body parts and entire bodies that could not be identified due to battle damage. That the 200 odd soldiers and 17 or so officers of the 203rd Battallion disappeared becomes, in context, less than surprising.

Same with Roanoke. It's all about context. It's all about the forest, not the trees. A colony, left alone for two, close to three years, running out of food because of the people who did not know how to deal with the new world around them? Roanoke was not the first colony to disintegrate in the time it took a supply ship to go from the New World to England and return.

Incidentally, I can't believe this thread came up again, after two years of being lost to the abyss.

Edited by aquatus1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't see the article about the dissapearing people :no:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only if you do it for the reasons that you pointed out above. If, on the other hand, you use your skeptical abilities and realize that the probability of the Harvard 'dude' actually having studied and learned about different sorts of phenomena that can result in the effect that the hobo reports are quite high, then it is not turning off your mind, but rather understanding that what Harvard offers is generally of a higher caliber, meaning that it contains far more research, logic, and reason, by virtue of being Harvard material (It is, after all, not merely a title handed out for nothing), as opposed to the hobo.

The Bermuda triangle is a non-mystery, in that it is essentially a created mystery done by exaggerating actual incidents, incompletely reporting other incidents, and outright fabricating more than a few incidents. When looked at in context, one realizes that the Bermuda Triangle region is actually the single most heavily traveled region near the U.S., with literally hundreds of flights and ships traversing through it on a daily basis. It is also the primary training ground for the U.S. Navy. If looked at statistically, there should actually be far more incidents than there actually are, due to the heavy traffic, but because of the heavy traffic, the area is more closely monitored than normal, and thus there are actually less incidents than normal. The "Mary Rose" and the Phildelphia Experiment, again, are also incidents that, upon stripping away the exagerration and embossements, become somewhat more banal.

Right, the Battle of Mons. The thing about this, again, is context. After the battle, the clean-up involved the logging of around 12,000 individual body parts and entire bodies that could not be identified due to battle damage. That the 200 odd soldiers and 17 or so officers of the 203rd Battallion disappeared becomes, in context, less than surprising.

Same with Roanoke. It's all about context. It's all about the forest, not the trees. A colony, left alone for two, close to three years, running out of food because of the people who did not know how to deal with the new world around them? Roanoke was not the first colony to disintegrate in the time it took a supply ship to go from the New World to England and return.

Incidentally, I can't believe this thread came up again, after two years of being lost to the abyss.

Okay I stand somewhat corrected. What is your opinion about the 'Mary Celeste'? The 4000 soldiers who disappeared with their horses, equipment and weapons during the 18th century Spanish war of Succession? The 600 French soldiers who, in 1885, disappeared near Saigon, Indo-China (now Vietnam) who, with teir equipment, were never seen again? And their are countless others, including 2900 Chinese Nationalist soldiers in 1939 who disappeared with all their equipment and weapons even though their mess tents and campfires were undisturbed?

Edited by Jaguat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You expect me to know about each and every incident you come up with? I would have to look into each individual one. And, you know, I would be willing to bet that, when seen in context, the vast majority of these mysteries will become just like all the others...simply not that mysterious.

Trying to blitkrieg someone with a mass of evidence is not the same as presenting good evidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.