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Naveed

What are you reading?

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I am reading 'The Road' by Cormac mcCarthy. So far so good :)

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funny thing, am in a book abnout 2012......not that I think something will happen, but at the same time it helps the time go by.....

David Dee

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Not sure what caused the urge but I am re-reading Alice Through the Looking-Glass.

:)

Nibs

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Well I'm reading the Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, part 2. Awsome book, everyone read the trilogy

I just finished reading " In the Heart of the Sea " It is a wonderful read.

http://www.amazon.com/Heart-Sea-Tragedy-Whaleship-Essex/dp/0141001828#reader_0141001828

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"One Train Later" by Andy Summers

Being one of my "heroes", I get a kick out of the humorous way he retells his life and how the guitar, once he discovers it, truly is the only constant throughout. If you have his photography book, "I'll Be Watching You: Inside the Police, 1980-83", the two books actually work well together once he gets involved with Sting and Copeland a little over halfway through "One Train".

"One Train Later" puts many of his photos in a better context than the small descriptions that are given in "I'll Be Watching You".

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skulduggery pleasant by derek landy

city of fallen angels by cassandra clare

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I am reading 'The Road' by Cormac mcCarthy. So far so good :)

if you haven't read Blood Meridian by McCarthy, DO IT. it's his best, imo, and it's also a great summer novel.

just finished Norwegian Wood, by Haruki Murakami, and rly enjoyed it. there's also a japanese movie based on it, though i haven't seen it yet. i'm about to start The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by the same author.

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Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

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"The Divorce Culture" by Barbara DeFoe/DeVoe Whitehall (author's name sp?) a pyschiatrist conducted a 25-year study from 1970 to 1995 (the book written in 1996) on children from divorced family as they grew up into adulthood. The book's studies find a majority of grown children of divorces in the 1970s find their difficulty in handling relationships and preservation or keeping a marriage from not repeating what their parents done.

Another book I recently read was "the Keys to Tulsa" by Bryan Fair Berkey, about a group of local wealthy 20-somethings from elite privileged backgrounds (the parents are oil rich) in the city of the book's title: Tulsa, Oklahoma. Later made into a movie in the 1990s, one famous line I memorized was from a minor character: a white supremacist who is an owner of his grass sod farm: "My seed is pure".

Edited by Makoto Jupiter

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Apathy, and Other Small Victories by Paul Neilan. Literally one of the funniest books I have ever read.

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Posted (edited)

Using my awesome deductive powers of necromancy, I necro bump this thread to the top.

Wellington: The Years Of The Sword by Elizabeth Longford. This is the first volume of a two volume end all biography on Arthur Wellesly, Duke of Wellington. The gist of this book mostly focuses on his military life while serving in India, Peninsular Wars, and culminating in Waterloo but also his private life through letters and his functions in the state during his extraordinary career. Exciting battles and an insightful intimate look at the person of Arthur Wellesly. The second volume is Wellington: Pillar of State, which obviously must focuses on his post-war life in the state and whatnot.

Edited by dside

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This week I started reading The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky and My Dark Places by James Ellroy.

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I am continuing my itinerary of leaders, explorers, and military greats from between 16th-19th centuries in the age of tall ships, cannon ball, and black powder.

Frederick The Great: The Magnificent Enigma by Robert B Asprey

This author wrote a two book biography on Napoleon Bonaparte too and has been recommended to me as one of the better biographies ever written on Boney as he divides historians and history fans. Napoleon was a great admirer of King Frederick II of Prussia (whom is one of the figures that influenced the Corsican militarily), a military genius that won 12 of 15 of his battles.

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The Rise Of Napoleon Bonaparte by Robert B Asprey.

The previous book I read by this author was fine (just fine) in its own right, not nearly as riveting or intimately detailed as the first volume Longford's Arthur Wellesly bio. Just wished it had more maps (with battle illustrations). A great book on the 7 Years War 1756-1763 is in order.

Now onto this book, it was this or Cronin's Boney bio? I chose this.

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I'm currently reading "American Gods", by Neil Gaimen. Somewhat interesting, though it seems to meander quite a bit at times.

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I've just started The Dress of the People by John Styles, and so far it's a very good read.

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I'm reading, "The Watcher" by Charles Mclean. It is, upto now, the best book I've read.

So many twists and turns, you never know whats going on. In the first couple of chapters there is a big big shock. Highly recommended

'There was no warning of any kind . . .'

Friday rush-hour. Martin Gregory, laden with packages, just manages to catch the 4.48 train. Tomorrow is his wife's birthday - he has a surprise in store - and he plans to devote the weekend to her and their beloved dogs. But Saturday morning, Martin rises early and does something so horrific, so inexplicable and so out of character his only option is to run . . .

And from this shocking incident the journey begins. With the help of a therapist he can't trust, and friends who no longer trust him, Martin's quest for meaning takes him down shifting realities and twisting corridors of time into the deepest recesses of the human mind. It is a world of menace and obsession from which neither he - nor the reader - can escape, for Martin Gregory is either lost in a dark maze of madness and horror, or frighteningly sane

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The Shield And The Sword/The Knights Of The Order by Ernle Bradford

The epic story of the Sovereign Military and Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem, of Rhodes, and of Malta. The oldest Order of Chivalry and the third oldest religious Order of Christendom. As told by one of the masters, historian Bradford.

(I also have the author's biography on the brilliant Muslim pirate-admiral Babarossa, known as Hayrettin Pasha to the Turks, who terrorized the Mediterranean seas for the Ottoman Empire during the 16th Century.)

Edited by dside

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I'm in the middle of a book called Stiff by Mary Roach

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An Unspeakable Crime, which is about the investigation, prosecution, and all that came later with a case from 1913 in which a 13 year-old was found murdered in the basement of the National Pencil Factory in Atlanta, Georgia where she'd gone to pick up her paycheck.

According to the book (I didn't know this) in those days, defendants didn't take the stand, but were allowed to address the jury before the jury decided on a verdict.

I'm looking forward to reading The life and Death Of Thelma Todd, which my local public library ordered, per my request.

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The Devil's Colony by James Rollins...who's books I usually enjoy, but Im really not digging this one so much. Probably because it might be hinting at Mormonism as being a valid religion.

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I just finished 'After the Darkness' by Sidney Sheldon (and I think it was finished off by Tilly Bagshawe, lesser known), and it was a good book in my opinion, but I feel like it lacked the overall plot-depth I've found in Sheldon's other novels, and I guess I just don't like how a lot of the ends seemed to be left untied, and how the story itself literally concluded. I don't know what exactly I was expecting, but it's probably one of my least favorite Sidney Sheldon novels I've read. However, I'm approximately 30 pages into 'The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest', and wading through the criminal investigation matters is a bit tedious for me, but I still can tell I'm going to Love this one just as much as the previous two books in the series. What'd Stieg Larsson (the author) die of anyway? Am I the only one who finds it a little odd in some way that one of his characters died in the middle of writing a book?

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An Unspeakable Crime, which is about the investigation, prosecution, and all that came later with a case from 1913 in which a 13 year-old was found murdered in the basement of the National Pencil Factory in Atlanta, Georgia where she'd gone to pick up her paycheck.

According to the book (I didn't know this) in those days, defendants didn't take the stand, but were allowed to address the jury before the jury decided on a verdict.

You're talking about the case of Leo Frank, right ?? Very interesting case. :yes:

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just starting the dark volume by gw dahlquist, will report more when im further in

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I'm in the middle of a book called Stiff by Mary Roach

Is that the one that's sort of about the history of burials and corpses? How they used to prepare cadavers and all that? Or am I thinking of something totally different?

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