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Waspie_Dwarf

Global Maps of Saturns Moons

20 posts in this topic

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Map of Dione - December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Saturn's moon Dione was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft, with gaps in coverage filled in by NASA's Voyager spacecraft data. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 400 meters (1,310 feet) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

The mean radius of Dione used for projection of this map is 560 kilometers (348 miles).

This map is an update to the version released in December 2005. See Map of Dione - December 2005.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Enceladus - December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Saturn's moon Enceladus was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft, with gaps in coverage filled in by NASA Voyager spacecraft data. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 300 meters (980 feet) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

The mean radius of Enceladus used for projection of this map is 252 kilometers (157 miles).

This map is an update to the version released in December 2005. See Map of Enceladus - December 2005.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Rhea - December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Saturn's moon Rhea was created using data taken during NASA's Cassini and Voyager spacecraft flybys. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 700 meters (2,300 feet) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

The mean radius of Rhea used for projection of this map is 764 kilometers (475 miles).

This map is an update to the version released in December 2005. See Map of Rhea - December 2005.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Tethys - December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Saturn's moon Tethys was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft, with gaps in coverage filled in by NASA's Voyager spacecraft data. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 300 meters (980 feet) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

The mean radius of Tethys used for projection of this map is 533 kilometers (331 miles). This map is an update to the version released in December 2005. See Map of Tethys - December 2005.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Mimas - December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Saturn's moon Mimas was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft, with gaps in coverage filled in by NASA's Voyager spacecraft data. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 400 meters (1,310 feet) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

The mean radius of Mimas used for projection of this map is 198 kilometers (123 miles). This map is an update to the version released in December 2005. See Map of Mimas - December 2005.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Titan - December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Titan was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). The data here consist of images taken using a filter centered at 938 nanometers, allowing researchers to examine albedo (or inherent brightness) variations across the surface of Titan. Due to the scattering of light by Titan's dense atmosphere, no topographic shading is visible in these images.

The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 2 kilometers (1.25 miles) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction. Actual resolution varies greatly across the map, with the best coverage (close to the map scale) near the center and edges of the map and the worst coverage on the trailing hemisphere (centered around 270 degrees west longitude).

Coverage should improve in some of the poorly covered areas starting in February 2007, when northern Belet, Adiri, and Dilmun will be imaged. Imaging coverage in the northern polar region, currently blank on this map, will improve over the next few years, as Titan approaches vernal equinox in August 2009.

The mean radius of Titan used for projection of this map is 2,575 kilometers (1,600 miles). Until a control network is created for Titan, the satellite is assumed to be spherical.

The named features are designated by the International Astronomical Union. (A "facula" on Titan is a bright spot; a "macula" is a dark spot.)

This map demonstrates how our knowledge of Titan's surface has been vastly improved since Cassini arrived and began mapping the outsize moon. See Mapping Titan's Surface and Titan's Variety (with Grid) for earlier Cassini maps of Titan.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Titan with Labels- December 2006

December 29, 2006

This global digital map of Titan was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS). The data here consist of images taken using a filter centered at 938 nanometers, allowing researchers to examine albedo (or inherent brightness) variations across the surface of Titan. Due to the scattering of light by Titan's dense atmosphere, no topographic shading is visible in these images. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 2 kilometers (1.25 miles) per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction. Actual resolution varies greatly across the map, with the best coverage (close to the map scale) near the center and edges of the map and the worst coverage on the trailing hemisphere (centered around 270 degrees west longitude).

Coverage should improve in some of the poorly covered areas starting in February 2007, when northern Belet, Adiri, and Dilmun will be imaged. Imaging coverage in the northern polar region, currently blank on this map, will improve over the next few years, as Titan approaches vernal equinox in August 2009.

The mean radius of Titan used for projection of this map is 2,575 kilometers (1,600 miles). Until a control network is created for Titan, the satellite is assumed to be spherical.

A clean version of the map, as well as a link to higher resolution versions, is available here.

The named features are designated by the International Astronomical Union. (A "facula" on Titan is a bright spot; a "macula" is a dark spot.)

This map demonstrates how our knowledge of Titan's surface has been vastly improved since Cassini arrived and began mapping the outsize moon. See Mapping Titan's Surface and Titan's Variety (with Grid) for earlier Cassini maps of Titan.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA\'s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Titan - October 2007

October 15, 2007

This global digital map of Titan was created using images taken by the Cassini spacecraft imaging science subsystem.

The images were taken using a filter centered at 938 nanometers, allowing researchers to examine albedo (or inherent brightness) variations across the surface of Titan. Due to the scattering of light by Titan's dense atmosphere, no topographic shading is visible in these images.

The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) per pixel. Actual resolution varies greatly across the map, with the best coverage (close to the map scale) near the center and edges of the map and the worst coverage on the trailing hemisphere (centered around 270 degrees west longitude).

Imaging coverage in the northern polar region is only just beginning to improve, and will continue to do so over the next couple of years, as Titan approaches vernal equinox in August 2009 and the north pole comes out of shadow. Large, dark and presumably liquid-hydrocarbon-filled seas are becoming visible at high latitudes (see also Exploring the Wetlands of Titan).

The mean radius of Titan used for projection of this map is 2,575 kilometers (1,600 miles). Until a control network is created for Titan, the moon is assumed to be spherical.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Iapetus - January 2008

January 31, 2008

This global map of Iapetus was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the poles.

The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 803 meters (0.5 miles) per pixel. Some territory seen in this map was imaged by Cassini's cameras using reflected light from Saturn. The mean radius of Iapetus used for projection of this map is 736 kilometers (457 miles). The resolution of the map is 16 pixels per degree. This updated map has been shifted west by 4.5 degrees of longitude, compared to the previously released Cassini product (see Map of Iapetus - December 2005), in order to conform to the International Astronomical Union longitude system convention for Iapetus.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit _http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at _http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Tethys - February 2008

February 20, 2008

This global map of Saturn's moon Tethys was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 292.5 meters (959.6 feet) per pixel. The mean radius of Tethys used for projection of this map is 536.3 kilometers (333.2 miles). The resolution of the map is 32 pixels per degree. This updated map has been shifted east by 1.5 degrees of longitude, compared to the previously released Cassini product (see Map of Tethys - December 2006), in order to conform to the International Astronomical Union longitude system convention for Tethys.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Dione - May 2008

May 20, 2008

This global map of Saturn's moon Dione was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

An extensive system of bright ice cliffs created by tectonic fractures adorns the moon's trailing hemisphere.

The map is a simple cylindrical (equidistant) projection and has a scale of 614 meters (2,014 feet) per pixel at the equator. The mean radius of Dione used for projection of this map is 562 kilometers (349 miles). This updated map has been shifted west by 0.6 degrees of longitude, compared to the previously released Cassini product Map of Dione - December 2006, in order to conform to the International Astronomical Union longitude system convention for Dione.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Tethys -- August 2008

August 6, 2008

This global map of Saturn's moon Tethys was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

The map is an equidistant (simple cylindrical) projection and has a scale of 292.5 meters (959.6 feet) per pixel at the equator. The mean radius of Tethys used for projection of this map is 536.3 kilometers (333.2 miles). The resolution of the map is 32 pixels per degree. This map is an update to the version released in February 2008, see Map of Tethys - February 2008.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Enceladus -- August 2008

August 6, 2008

This global map of Saturn's moon Enceladus was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

The map is an equidistant (simple cylindrical) projection and has a scale of 440 meters (1,444 feet) per pixel at the equator. The mean radius of Enceladus used for projection of this map is 252 kilometers (157 miles).This mosaic map is an update to the version released in December 2006 (see Map of Enceladus - December 2006). The mosaic was shifted by 3.5 degrees to the west, compared to the previous version, to be consistent with the International Astronomical Union longitude definition for Enceladus.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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The Dione Atlas

August 6, 2008

Presented here is a complete set of cartographic map sheets from a high-resolution Dione atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team. The map sheets form a 15-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Dione at a nominal scale of 1:1,000,000. An index for the atlas is included here, along with an unlabeled version of each terrain section. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Dione used for projection of the maps is 562.53 kilometers (349.54 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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The Tethys Atlas

August 6, 2008

Presented here is a complete set of cartographic map sheets from a high-resolution Tethys atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

The map sheets form a 15-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Tethys at a nominal scale of 1:1,000,000. An index for the atlas is included here, along with an unlabeled version of each terrain section. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Tethys used for projection of the maps is 536.3 kilometers (333.2 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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The Enceladus Atlas

August 6, 2008

Presented here is a complete set of cartographic map sheets from a high-resolution Enceladus atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

The map sheets form a 15-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Enceladus at a nominal scale of 1:500,000. An index for the atlas is included here, along with an unlabeled version of each terrain section. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Enceladus used for projection of the maps is 252.1 kilometers (156.6 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

***ERRATA (2008-02-13): Longitude System Discrepancy*** The maps presented here did not account for the most recent recommendations by the International Astronomical Union cartography working group as described in Seidelmann et al., 2007. There is a slight difference (about 0.9 degrees) between the longitudes given in this atlas and the IAU definition. With the new recommendations, crater Salih should have a fixed longitude of 5 degrees West. Crater Salih is hardly visible in the Cassini images therefore the exact consequences of preparation of these maps without the new recommendations is difficult to estimate. Crater Salih will be imaged with better resolution during the upcoming Enceladus flybys in 2008. The imaging team will use these coming images to determine the exact shift between the current atlas and the IAU definition and will release a corrected (shifted) version of this atlas in 2009.

References:

(1) Davies, M. E. and Katayama, F. Y., The control networks of Mimas and Enceladus, Icarus, 53, 332-340, 1983 (2) Seidelmann, P. K. and 14 co-authors, Report of the IAU/IAGWorking Group on cartographic coordinates and rotational elements: 2006, Celestial Mech. Dyn. Astr., 98, 155-180, 2007.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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The Iapetus Atlas

October 17, 2008

Presented here is a complete set of cartographic map sheets from a high-resolution Iapetus atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

The map sheets form a three-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Iapetus. As noted on the map, while both Saragossa Terra and Roncevaux Terra are bright regions on the moon's surface, they are distinct from each other in that the former has a slightly reddish color and the latter does not.

The map sheets cover the entire surface of Iapetus at a nominal scale of 1:3,000,000. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Iapetus used for projection of the maps is 736 kilometers (457 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Iapetus - May 2008

October 17, 2008

This global map of Saturn’s moon Iapetus was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

Iapetus is the moon of Saturn which, curiously, has one bright hemisphere and one dark.

The map is an equidistant (simple cylindrical) projection and has a scale of 803 meters (0.5 miles) per pixel at the equator. Some territory seen in this map was imaged by Cassini using reflected light from Saturn. The mean radius of Iapetus used for projection of this map is 736 kilometers (457 miles). The resolution of the map is 16 pixels per degree. This mosaic map is an update to the version released in January 2008 (See Map of Iapetus - Januarly 2008).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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The Mimas Atlas

October 17, 2008

Presented here is a cartographic map sheet which forms a high-resolution Mimas atlas, a project of the Cassini Imaging Team.

Mimas, as imaged by the Voyager spacecraft in the early 1980s, has a very large, distinguishing crater that makes it look like the “Death Star.” As shown in this map, that crater is named Herschel.

The map sheets form a three-quadrangle series covering the entire surface of Mimas at a nominal scale of 1:1,500,000. The map data was acquired by the Cassini imaging experiment. The mean radius of Mimas used for projection of the maps is 198.2 kilometers (123.2 miles). Names for features have been approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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Map of Mimas - May 2008

October 17, 2008

This global map of Saturn’s moon Mimas was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

The moon's large, distinguishing crater, Herschel, is seen on the map at left.

The map is an equidistant (simple cylindrical) projection and has a scale of 432 meters (1,417 feet) per pixel at the equator. The mean radius of Mimas used for projection of this map is 198.2 kilometers (123.2 miles). The resolution of the map is 8 pixels per degree. This mosaic map is an update to the version released in January 2008 (See Map of Mimas - December 2006).

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov. The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org.

Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Source: NASA/JPL - Cassini

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