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village_idiot

The Bermuda Triangle a testing ground?

55 posts in this topic

So I was sitting there the other day,lost in thought (as usual) when a really crazy idea came to mind. I remember reading somewhere that the Atlanteans were supposed to have made some super-powerful,crystal-powered weapon...the very weapon that ultimately destroyed them. I don't remember where I read it, but I remember it had something to do with Edgar Cayce. Anyway, here's my thought:what if the Atlantean tested this weapon in (what is now) the Triangle? Surely a weapon of such magnitude may have repercussions...like our nukes of today leave radiation behind after detonation. What if the Triangle is nothing more than a fallout zone, left by weapons tests from the Atlanteans? It makes a little bit of sense (to me at least) that these crystal-powered weapons radiation may have had an affect on the magnetic poles in the area...I don't know...am I crazy or does someone also share in my thoughts?

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The Bermuda Triangle is no mystery.

It is a curious mix of exaggeration and distortion by bias. You see, you could draw a triangle that size in many areas of the globe and come up with a similar number of mising ships/planes/people etc.

According to the shipping insurance, Lloyds of London:

"428 vessels have been reported missing around the world since 1955, and it may interest you to know that our intelligence service can find no evidence to support the claim that the 'Bermuda Triangle' has more losses than elsewhere."

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Interesting read on the subject over at the skeptics dictionary. - Link

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am I crazy or does someone also share in my thoughts?

It's an interesting theory. Unfortunately, I have little input here, other than to say that houses were found below sea level somewhere in the area;

http://s8int.com/water1.html

"A team of Canadian and Cuban researchers have discovered the remains of what may be a 6,000-year-old city submerged in deep ocean waters off the western coast of Cuba.

Using sophisticated sonar and videotape equipment, offshore engineer Paulina Zelitsky, her husband, Paul Weinzweig, and her son, Ernesto Tapanes, have found megaliths "of a kind you'd find at Stonehenge or Easter Island," Mr. Weinzweig said in an interview yesterday."

I can't say that I wholeheartedly believe these findings are what anyone would claim they are, but the possibility is always there. I haven't even read the site above fully, but it looked relevant enough to share.

It's the kind of thing that isn't widely known just because it doesn't make sense, and in a world where mankind assumes they are supreme beings that have figured everything out ([sarcasm] Which must be why we're still racked with famine, war, disease, crime, poverty, etc. :tu: [/sarcasm]), what doesn't make sense is swept aside and assumed to be false, regardless of any evidence, however good, to the contrary.

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According to the shipping insurance, Lloyds of London:

"428 vessels have been reported missing around the world since 1955, and it may interest you to know that our intelligence service can find no evidence to support the claim that the 'Bermuda Triangle' has more losses than elsewhere."

Myth:

“A check of Lloyd’s of London’s accident records by the editor of Fate in 1975 showed that the triangle was a no more dangerous part of the ocean than any other. U.S. Coast Guard records confirmed this and since that time no good arguments have ever been made to refute those statistics. So the Bermuda Triangle mystery disappeared, in the same way many of its supposed victims had vanished.”

Fact:

This is completely false. Lloyd’s does not insure the smaller stuff, so all yachts go unreported and uncataloged in statistics. Lloyd’s seldom insures the smaller charter and private aircraft, so likewise for them. Lloyd’s is not the ultimate source. It is not a marine investigation bureau. It reports on sailing news relevant to insurance.

US Coast Guard SAR (Search and Rescue) statistics for all districts are published yearly in a thick voluminous report. This details the statistics for calls of assistance, causes of accidents, weather, deaths, conditions, whatever. However, missing vessels are not readily included. In reality, the designation Overdue Vessels are more important. But because it is hard to determine the number of people on board and exactly where the vessel last was, “missing” or “overdue” cannot be easily calculated. They may be catagorized under “caused by other factor” if at all. I have just received a list of vessels from the 7th district after 12 years of asking for and being denied missing vessel statistics, always receiving the reply “nobody tracks such statistics.” For the last 2 fiscal years this includes about 300 vessel names or types. And now I must start my search, to see which reported back to port (if any), what the weather conditions were like, etc.

The Coast Guard is not even capable of accurately determining the numbers, and therefore could never have conducted a study. What they probably did was comment on the popular notion that 20 aircraft and 50 ships are missing. That number was bandied about incessantly in the 1970s and is still in the Encyclopedia Britannica. This number is not extraordinary for 100 years, though it is more aircraft than elsewhere over seas.

NTSB database searches reveal that in the last decade only a handful of aircraft disappearances have occurred off New England while over 30 have happened in the Triangle. These are American statistics only, and do not reflect other nationalities.

Then there are those who claim the disparity is due to the Triangle’s greater amount of traffic. In reality, the 1st Coast Guard district answers about just as many calls for assistance as the 7th, but the number of disappearances is still remarkably different.

http://www.bermuda-triangle.org/html/myths___facts.html

Some interesting links on this thread..

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum...=148532&hl=

..including strange goings on around the waters of Puerto Rico and credible,radar corellated reports of Unidentified Submerged Objects:

USOs:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum...=145983&hl=

Puerto Rico:

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum...=148197&hl=

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It's an interesting theory. Unfortunately, I have little input here, other than to say that houses were found below sea level somewhere in the area;

http://s8int.com/water1.html

"A team of Canadian and Cuban researchers have discovered the remains of what may be a 6,000-year-old city submerged in deep ocean waters off the western coast of Cuba.

Using sophisticated sonar and videotape equipment, offshore engineer Paulina Zelitsky, her husband, Paul Weinzweig, and her son, Ernesto Tapanes, have found megaliths "of a kind you'd find at Stonehenge or Easter Island," Mr. Weinzweig said in an interview yesterday."

I can't say that I wholeheartedly believe these findings are what anyone would claim they are, but the possibility is always there. I haven't even read the site above fully, but it looked relevant enough to share.

It's the kind of thing that isn't widely known just because it doesn't make sense, and in a world where mankind assumes they are supreme beings that have figured everything out ([sarcasm] Which must be why we're still racked with famine, war, disease, crime, poverty, etc. :tu: [/sarcasm]), what doesn't make sense is swept aside and assumed to be false, regardless of any evidence, however good, to the contrary.

Yeah, there has been nothing on this for over 7 years now. Was found to be just a rock formation showing unusual shapes. The newspapers just add stuff to make it more interesting to the readers but at the expense of reality.

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Posted (edited)

So I was sitting there the other day,lost in thought (as usual) when a really crazy idea came to mind. I remember reading somewhere that the Atlanteans were supposed to have made some super-powerful,crystal-powered weapon...the very weapon that ultimately destroyed them. I don't remember where I read it, but I remember it had something to do with Edgar Cayce. Anyway, here's my thought:what if the Atlantean tested this weapon in (what is now) the Triangle? Surely a weapon of such magnitude may have repercussions...like our nukes of today leave radiation behind after detonation. What if the Triangle is nothing more than a fallout zone, left by weapons tests from the Atlanteans? It makes a little bit of sense (to me at least) that these crystal-powered weapons radiation may have had an affect on the magnetic poles in the area...I don't know...am I crazy or does someone also share in my thoughts?

As far as I know there has been no proof either way, it's still open for concepts. *shrugs*

And in regards to how the disappearances are nothing unusual, perhaps it's the way things have disappeared that makes it a mystery?

Edited by Moon Minion

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Posted (edited)

As far as I know there has been no proof either way, it's still open for concepts. *shrugs*

And in regards to how the disappearances are nothing unusual, perhaps it's the way things have disappeared that makes it a mystery?

??????

Yes there is Atlantis never existed - it was a construct Plato used to illustrate political theory. Heck, it was supposed to have sunk into the Ocean 9600 BC, Plato lived 300-400 BC!! It was bequeathed to Poseidon - this was all possible because it is fiction.

Edited by psyche101

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But why is the water so calm, when ships disappear?

And there is no shipwrecks, aircraft or anyone there...its just empty.

But something there generates electricty and makes clouds make funny formations.

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Posted (edited)

But why is the water so calm, when ships disappear?

And there is no shipwrecks, aircraft or anyone there...its just empty.

But something there generates electricty and makes clouds make funny formations.

So calm? How do you know that if the ships disappear?

Please have a look at this link = LINK

The Purpose of this page is an attack on the pseudo-scientific publications that try to turn the Triangle into some mystical place that is a warp in the fabric of time or some kind of UFO landing spot. While some people will believe that stuff no matter what they read, this page is an attempt to explain away the myths and get to facts that created them. Let the fiction writers have their fun, let the pseudo-scientist with his half-baked facts.

What this page will explain is why currents in the area around the triangle can be dangerous, how a ship or plane can be lost without a trace, why many of the occurrences that are truly a mystery can not be attributed to the triangle, and why

some of the so-called mysteries are no more than over-active imaginations.

There is a force at work here - the gulf stream.

Edited by psyche101

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But why is the water so calm, when ships disappear?

It usually isn't. It's just that those details are usually left out or not not emphasized. For instance, the story you usually hear about flight19, withoutlooking it up, was it a clear day?

And there is no shipwrecks, aircraft or anyone there...its just empty.

Do you mean after a disappearance? Yeah, that's not that unusual. The ocean does a pretty good job of getting rid of evidence.

But something there generates electricty and makes clouds make funny formations.

Nah, not really. I worked out of Bermuda for two years on an ocean-going tug. Never saw anything out of the ordinary.

It's a patch of ocean, like any other.

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??????

Yes there is Atlantis never existed - it was a construct Plato used to illustrate political theory. Heck, it was supposed to have sunk into the Ocean 9600 BC, Plato lived 300-400 BC!! It was bequeathed to Poseidon - this was all possible because it is fiction.

Lol, oh I wasn't referring to Atlantis, I was referring more to the Bermuda Triangle still being a mystery. That perhaps the way things have vanished is still open to concepts? I hope that makes sense. :blush:

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Lol, oh I wasn't referring to Atlantis, I was referring more to the Bermuda Triangle still being a mystery. That perhaps the way things have vanished is still open to concepts? I hope that makes sense. :blush:

Ahh, I thought you were agreeing with the post you quoted where it says

I remember reading somewhere that the Atlanteans were supposed to have made some super-powerful,crystal-powered weapon...

Atlantean's............ hehe

It's all good! :D

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It usually isn't. It's just that those details are usually left out or not not emphasized. For instance, the story you usually hear about flight19, withoutlooking it up, was it a clear day?

Do you mean after a disappearance? Yeah, that's not that unusual. The ocean does a pretty good job of getting rid of evidence.

Nah, not really. I worked out of Bermuda for two years on an ocean-going tug. Never saw anything out of the ordinary.

It's a patch of ocean, like any other.

I don't know, they found the Titanic shipwreck ok, they do find lots of things. I'm more curious as I've said as to the way things vanish there.

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I don't know, they found the Titanic shipwreck ok, they do find lots of things. I'm more curious as I've said as to the way things vanish there.

It is likely that most of the disappearances are from mechanical malfunctions, operator error or adverse weather. Or even a combination of the three. Sometimes emergencies can arise without notice and leave no time for distress calls, the ocean has and always will be an indifferent mistress.

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It is likely that most of the disappearances are from mechanical malfunctions, operator error or adverse weather. Or even a combination of the three. Sometimes emergencies can arise without notice and leave no time for distress calls, the ocean has and always will be an indifferent mistress.

Yes that's definitely one plausible theory, but still theory. Until someone can prove the Bermuda triangle is no mystery, it is still a mystery.

But like everything there probably is some boring logical explanation to it, waiting to be found out. *Sighs* :mellow:

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Yes that's definitely one plausible theory, but still theory. Until someone can prove the Bermuda triangle is no mystery, it is still a mystery.

But like everything there probably is some boring logical explanation to it, waiting to be found out. *Sighs* :mellow:

It is not all that myserious in perspective

Why do ships and planes seem to go missing in the region? Some authors suggested it may be due to a strange magnetic anomaly that affects compass readings (in fact they claim Columbus noted this when he sailed through the area in 1492). Others theorize that methane eruptions from the ocean floor may suddenly be turning the sea into a froth that can't support a ship's weight so it sinks (though there is no evidence of this type of thing happening in the Triangle for the past 15,000 years). Several books have gone as far as conjecturing that the disappearances are due to an intelligent, technologically advanced race living in space or under the sea.

Kusche's Theory

In 1975 Larry Kusche, a librarian at Arizona State University, reached a totally different conclusion. Kusche decided to investigate the claims made by these articles and books. What he found he published in his own book entitled The Bermuda Triangle Mystery-Solved. Kusche had carefully dug into records other writers had neglected. He found that many of the strange accidents were not so strange after all. Often a Triangle writer had noted a ship or plane had disappeared in "calms seas" when the record showed a raging storm had been in progress. Others said ships had "mysteriously vanished" when their remains had actually been found and the cause of their sinking explained. In one case a ship listed missing in the Triangle actually had disappeared in the Pacific Ocean some 3,000 miles away! The author had confused the name of the Pacific port the ship had left with a city of the same name on the Atlantic coast.

LINK

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It is not all that myserious in perspective

LINK

Yes, then there are people who run a little too fast and loose with the facts. Between that and the mundane crashes/sinking/emergencies there is little room left for something supernatural at work here IMO.

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Posted (edited)

Yes, then there are people who run a little too fast and loose with the facts. Between that and the mundane crashes/sinking/emergencies there is little room left for something supernatural at work here IMO.

Yes, it's seems reasonable to rule out anything unusual or paranormal.

Edited by Moon Minion

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I don't know, they found the Titanic shipwreck ok, they do find lots of things. I'm more curious as I've said as to the way things vanish there.

Oh yeah, they found the Titanic OK...it just took about a dozen expeditions, millions of dollars worth of investment, and robotic vehicles that took decades to design and build. :lol:

As to the way things vanish there, well, they vanish there the same way they vanish anywhere else. Either you get a distress call, or it just doesn't show up on schedule.

Yes that's definitely one plausible theory, but still theory. Until someone can prove the Bermuda triangle is no mystery, it is still a mystery.

Ah...I'm not sure you got that in the right order. Generally, one has to prove that something exists before they try to disprove it. After all, how can something be disproven if it hasn't been proved to begin with.

But like everything there probably is some boring logical explanation to it, waiting to be found out. *Sighs* :mellow:

Unfortunately, yes, there is. And it ultimately comes down to nothing more complex than sensationalism. A man decided to sell stories to make money, and played fast and loose with the facts to make them more interesting.

The mystery...is a non-mystery. It never existed.

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The mystery...is a non-mystery. It never existed.

Alas, I humbly admit defeat.

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Alas, I humbly admit defeat.

It's only a defeat if you think of it that way. Personally when one of my theories gets shot down, I see it as gaining knowledge and insight. Like snatching victory from the jaws of defeat! :tu:

OK, maybe not that dramatic, but it's only a loss if you don't consider the possible gains. ^_^

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It's only a defeat if you think of it that way. Personally when one of my theories gets shot down, I see it as gaining knowledge and insight. Like snatching victory from the jaws of defeat! :tu:

OK, maybe not that dramatic, but it's only a loss if you don't consider the possible gains. ^_^

Thanks mate, I'll try and keep that in mind. ^_^

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Alas, I humbly admit defeat.

:lol:

Dude, this isn't a competition!

You learned something new, and that's fantastic!

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Posted (edited)

It's only a defeat if you think of it that way. Personally when one of my theories gets shot down, I see it as gaining knowledge and insight. Like snatching victory from the jaws of defeat! :tu:

OK, maybe not that dramatic, but it's only a loss if you don't consider the possible gains. ^_^

I agree also, I think this is a good attitude to have. Although its sometimes easier said than done, but in the end if something can looked at honestly then there is something to learn from the defeat.

Edited by Voyager10

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