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thefinalfrontier

Space Cloud to Collide With Our Galaxy

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A colossal cloud of gas is racing toward a collision with our galaxy, and when it hits, the crash could trigger an intense burst of star formation.

The collision and stellar light show will occur in 20 million to 40 million years, an astronomer announced here today at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

The cloud, dubbed Smith's Cloud after the astronomer who discovered it in 1963, is just 8,000 light-years from our galaxy's disk. Jam-packed with enough hydrogen to make a million stars like the sun, it is 11,000 light-years long and 2,500 light-years wide.

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Oooooh!

*Sits down with tub of popcorn to wait for the show*

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lets pump some stars back into the galaxy :)

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Oooooh!

*Sits down with tub of popcorn to wait for the show*

:lol: I sure hope its a HUGE tub of popcorn, lol,

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You know how amazing that would be to see? I cannot even imagine.

*Standing in my lawn, smoking a cigarette. See all these explosions in the sky.* "Hey, honey, look at thi- OH MY GAAAAAHHHH!!!!!" *incinerates*

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Wow! That'll be cool to see in... 20 or 40 million years...

...

That's a lot of reincarnation.

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