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Eddy_P

DOOPArts documented-out-of-place artifacts

146 posts in this topic

My name is Eddy Pengelly, chief researcher for the South Australian based PPHC Study Group.

Here is a new set of modern mysteries that are said to solve many old myths and ancient mysteries.

On 2nd April 2009 after a decade of study and investigation, I coined the new term DOOPArt, being an acronym for documented-out-of-place artifact.

This is where documented accounts from ancient myths, stories, and texts reveal where ancient people describe the contents of an oopart in their own words and/or depict the oopart itself - which they apparently saw and/or held in their own hands.

A DOOPArt is where the description and contents of a modern technological object have been found in very unusual or seemingly impossible contexts, such as being depicted in hieroglyphs or documented in ancient myths and legends as well as what are now known as religious texts.

But unlike the discovery of an out-of-place artifact during an archaeological dig, in these DOOPArt cases, only the documented descriptions of the oopart encounter have been discovered - and not the oopart itself.

More importantly, unlike the oopart cases which deem the ancient cultures themselves as having technology equal to or more advanced than our current level, a DOOPArt specifically describes certain mid 1995 technology, that has somehow been seen operating in the past.

Details at World Breaking Discoveries DOOPArt Evaluation Session

There is an interactive on-line 10 Texts Evaluation Session which allows you to lodge your opinion. It gives you the opportunity to check out 10 ancient texts and compare their descriptions to the content of a modern historical object.

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Seems a little wishful thinking to me. A circle within a circle is a picture of a CD? Even when it's right next to a picture of a circular sun and a circular Earth?

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Eddy is just trolling here, later on all the people interested will be notified that they can read more in a series of pamphlets available for a small charge

this is why if you go to the homepage instead of thre specially set up page that eddy linked to you will see on the right hand side a link marked

online store

this will take you to this page

http://www.worldbreakingdiscoveries.com.au...rther_study.php

note

1. Purchase then Download the World Breaking Discoveries E-Book - 2007 Report

A definitive summary of ten years of research, discoveries, and evidence plus explanations.

Purchase then Download PPHC-SG Resource Books in E-Book format

:tu:

I also note that since Eddy last posted at the ghmb one of his pages that allegedly asked people for their opinion Eddy has collated these opinions and is now using it as proof to substantiate his marketing, despite the fact that the vast majority of people polled said it was complete and utter nonsense

:tu:

when it comes down to it, eddy himself doesn't know anything about ancient history, if he did then his attempt at spelling Sumerian

SUMARIAN Study

might be more impressive

:w00t:

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The results so far from a segment of 16 responses are

96.56

83.00

97.71

96.56

96.56

54.52

49.12

96.56

96.56

96.56

95.94

96.41

96.56

96.56

88.47

57.65

giving an average validation score of 87.2

This affirms that the discoveries by the Australian researcher Ronald Pegg are real.

Have you conducted your own on-line Interactive Evaluation Session?

LINK: http://www.worldbreakingdiscoveries.com.au...arts/index.html

The period in which the above 16 replies were given was April to 23 June 2009, being the response to the new 2009 DOOPArt examination.

Results from previous evaluation sessions in 2008 revealed some strange happenings.

Checking the logs for the time taken to complete the 10 Text evaluation derived an average of between 20 minutes and forty five minutes to complete the whole task.

Some people had taken under 5 minutes, 3 minutes in one case, to complete it, obviously NOT actually reading the content, as all selections were set to zero on all the 10 pages.

Also, several people had changed all the answers to 100 taking less than 6 minutes to do so.

Both of these false validations were removed from the overall scores, but as three lots of zeros weigh out the three lots of 100s, it did not affect the final score.

PREVIOUS RESULTS

The June to August 2008 Evaluation that did not have full explanations for each text AND where the name of the person completing the session was not required, derived a validity score of 64.74 (out of 100) from 54 people.

The September 2008 to March 2009 Evaluation Session that asked for people's names derived:

for Religious respondents 41.89

for non-religious respondents 85.97

giving an overall average (similar to the first session) of 66.38

BUT 28 people (not included in the above figures) did not give their name, and derived an average of 89.37

with the lowest being 28.99 and highest being 99.41

The obvious attempts to throw the scores by inputting either all zeros or all 100s were excluded from all results.

A big thank you to all those who took the time to complete the session honestly and left their name - and to those who may yet complete the on-line session..

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Great.

What do I get to buy?

Where do I enter my credit card number and how fast is the shipping?

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The circle with a circle is the hieroglyph for "Ra", aka. the sun. End of story.

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The results so far from a segment of 16 responses are

96.56

83.00

97.71

96.56

96.56

54.52

49.12

96.56

96.56

96.56

95.94

96.41

96.56

96.56

88.47

57.65

giving an average validation score of 87.2

This affirms that the discoveries by the Australian researcher Ronald Pegg are real.

Questions answered on a website by visitors do not in any way affirm that any discoveries are real. The first casualty of the internet is truth. Anyone can post anything about anything whether true or not. Images can be photo shopped with relative ease. One claim is your bible is several hundred years old, but the font seems too new and many (not all) old bibles use in places the letter s which resembles a lower case f and some spell book as booke. You will need to scan the main page and the page that includes the copyright date and link to them before your bible can be seriously taken to be several hundred years old. Without that information available, your entire discovery and claims about it can be considered nothing less than a flight of fantasy and nothing more than an attempt to get money from the gullible.

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Posted (edited)

Holy **EDIT**, this must be the biggest crapload I've read on the Net in a long time, and I usually like alternative history theories... :wacko:

**The language filters are there for a reason, Sagittarius**

Edited by aquatus1

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Posted (edited)

This affirms that the discoveries by the Australian researcher Ronald Pegg are real.

No it doesn't, not even in the slightest. Just because 16 anonymous people on the internet agree that a description of something matches a picture from something else, it doesn't mean that there is suddenly a factually accurate archaeological and historical correlation.

For example, the first image supposedly representing Plato's statement could come from countless renaissance paintings. There is absolutely nothing unique to that image to tie it to that passage. Simply saying "this phrase mentions a walled city, therefore this picture of a walled city must be the one they're talking about" is beyond naive.

And the questions you are asking are totally misleading. You are not asking whether or not people think that what the Egg of Brahma is explicitly describing is the contents of a CD ROM. You're asking if they agree that the Egg of Brahma describes 21 zones, and the CD has 21 pages. Yes, these are both correct, but that doesn't mean, in any way whatsoever, that one caused the other.

Silliest thread of the month award.

Edited by Emma_Acid

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Also, what is it you're actually getting at? Your website says

a DOOPArt specifically describes certain mid 1990s technology, that has somehow been seen operating in the past.

...are you seriously trying to say that somehow ancient civilisations have been using PCs, Windows 98 and this particular CD-ROM in such random and separate times as Iron Age India, Babylon during the 7th Century BC, and Greece in the 4th Century BC?????

I've changed my mind: silliest thread ever.

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The results so far from a segment of 16 responses are

...

giving an average validation score of 87.2

This affirms that the discoveries by the Australian researcher Ronald Pegg are real.

That you only got 16 responses over a 3 month period should tell you something right there.

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I will second that Aquatus1

Thanks

B???

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Archaeology by viewer opinion poll. What'll they think of next?

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this is just sad and embarrassing

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Most gently ( and kindly!) phrased. Pseudo-science has somehow achieved a new "level".

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Hi. I think this is a brilliant business model and I want in. What can I do?

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I've run into EddyP at an Egyptian-themed forum where I'm a Moderator. As it is a discussion forum for the orthodox views of Egyptology, you can imagine he gets even fewer responses there. Not surprisingly he hasn't been there in a while, but I'll bet he'll be back.

He lured me in the first time he popped into that Egyptian forum. He was asking for help with translations from a snippet of a Book of the Dead. This text can be difficult to translate but I thought I'd be helpful, and worked on it for him. LOL You can imagine how disappointed I was when EddyP's true intent came out. I not only wasted my time, I felt like a fool.

EddyP is one of many people who somehow think it works to invent their own "translations" for hieroglyphs, never mind that the conventional means have proven reliable and effective for many years.

LOL I've been forever tainted by the experience. Now whenever I see the sun-disk glyph for Re, I think of CDs. :w00t:

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I couldn't even take his test-thing, so boring and amny things were taken out of context, so far out context it really is just a boring and useless way to waste time.

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The whole think is just build on assumptions, like some said there's a whole load of whisfull thinking there.

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Well, if you found a large round stone the size of a football, would the researcher evaluate a relationship to a football???

Sheer waste of time reading this post and typing this. As emma said...Silliest Thread ever.

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I did the first few pages of the test before loosing interest. This is silly. If you look hard enough in ancient texts (or modern ones for that matter) you could find descriptions of anything. I'm sure if I looked hard enough I could find 'proof' that the ancient Greeks watched Star Wars! Did the writers of these ancient texts have access to a computer and CD-rom? The short (and correct) answer is no!

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...I'm sure if I looked hard enough I could find 'proof' that the ancient Greeks watched Star Wars!...

Is that how it worked? I've often thought that Zeus and Darth Vader were a lot a like. :lol:

I jest. You made a good point, Atana.

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Is that how it worked? I've often thought that Zeus and Darth Vader were a lot a like. :lol:

I jest. You made a good point, Atana.

But they are, young Padawan learner, they are ;):P

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But they are, young Padawan learner, they are ;):P

Eesh, if I'm a Padawan I must be extremely bad at training because I'd be the oldest Padawan at Jedi U. :lol:

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I was thinking of the Trojan war - Helen of Troy was really Princess Leia and the Trojan Horse was really when Han and Luke get dressed up as Stormtroopers and take Chewie as a prisoner into the Death Star. "I fear the rebels most when they come bearing gifts"... Wow, we've made a discovery - the Ancient Greeks really did watch Star Wars! Thanks be to Darth Vader I mean Zeus!

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