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danielost

question about a tidal wave

18 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

how far inland could a 3 mile high wave travel. I know that Australia would be completely swamped but what about Europe, Asia, north and south America, Africa. well we're at it the middle east.

Edited by danielost

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how far inland could a 3 mile high wave travel. I know that Australia would be completely swamped but what about Europe, Asia, north and south America, Africa. well we're at it the middle east.

The highest wave was just over 1700 feet. I don't know what kind of disaster would cause a wave that high to hit. I don't know how much land though since you didn't specify how wide the 3 mile wave would be.

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Posted (edited)

The highest wave was just over 1700 feet. I don't know what kind of disaster would cause a wave that high to hit. I don't know how much land though since you didn't specify how wide the 3 mile wave would be.

it was the wave from the astroid that killed the dinos. According to the show it swamped madigascar. for those who don't know that would be on the other side of africa from where it hit in mexico

Edited by danielost

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I read that huge waves are also caused by earthquakes. Alaska had a landslide that caused a tidal wave in California in the 60's.

The recend Indonesia Tsunami was caused by quakes.

Hurricane storm surge waves can be high as well - 25 feet. Hurricane Camille hit the US South in the 60's. It was a category 5.

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it probably wasn't a wave that killed the dinosaurs after an meteor strike but the after effects like enough debris being in the atmosphere afterwards to start to affect plant life which would chain react .... fires set ... ect...

there are some that say the climate was changing .... some that think insects were killing off the dinos.

I don't know about that last part... no doubt different things killed them and disease via insects is a good way ... but not everything died out. small mammals survived .... some sea life ......

IMO a meteor strike would have been like the straw that broke the camels back. They however didn't all die at once.

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it probably wasn't a wave that killed the dinosaurs after an meteor strike but the after effects like enough debris being in the atmosphere afterwards to start to affect plant life which would chain react .... fires set ... ect...

there are some that say the climate was changing .... some that think insects were killing off the dinos.

I don't know about that last part... no doubt different things killed them and disease via insects is a good way ... but not everything died out. small mammals survived .... some sea life ......

IMO a meteor strike would have been like the straw that broke the camels back. They however didn't all die at once.

didn't say it was a wave that killed them. I said that the wave was part of the impact of the 7500 ton meteor that hit the earth. 10 kilometers high.

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how far inland could a 3 mile high wave travel. I know that Australia would be completely swamped but what about Europe, Asia, north and south America, Africa. well we're at it the middle east.

Europe -

A 3 mile high wave hitting Europe is impossible because the sea isn't that deep around the continent. Even if a 3 mile high wave was generated Mid-Atlantic it would begin to break several hundred miles off European Coasts cutting it down to jsut a few hundred feet by the time it got here.

USA -

A 3 mile wave could strike the US as the sea drops to deep depths very quickly off most of the US coast.

Japan

Due to the depness of the PAcific off Japans coast I'd say it could be struck by a bigger wave than one simply 3 miles high.

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Posted (edited)

Europe -

A 3 mile high wave hitting Europe is impossible because the sea isn't that deep around the continent. Even if a 3 mile high wave was generated Mid-Atlantic it would begin to break several hundred miles off European Coasts cutting it down to jsut a few hundred feet by the time it got here.

USA -

A 3 mile wave could strike the US as the sea drops to deep depths very quickly off most of the US coast.

Japan

Due to the depness of the PAcific off Japans coast I'd say it could be struck by a bigger wave than one simply 3 miles high.

ok but this wave was generated off the coast of mexico in fact part of the meteor would have hit land. I should add in the gulf of mexico.

Edited by danielost

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ok but this wave was generated off the coast of mexico in fact part of the meteor would have hit land. I should add in the gulf of mexico.

No doubt thousand of Dinosaur skeletons have been found over the years however there is nothing to indicte mass trama, burning, disease or the malnutrition you would expect to see from the collapse of the eco system caused by a giant asteriod strike.

The only thing I think could instantly wipe out the dinosaurs without leaving a trace in the fossil records is suffocation or hypothermia. Although tidal waves can be destructive it doesn't effect the entire planet.

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No doubt thousand of Dinosaur skeletons have been found over the years however there is nothing to indicte mass trama, burning, disease or the malnutrition you would expect to see from the collapse of the eco system caused by a giant asteriod strike.

The only thing I think could instantly wipe out the dinosaurs without leaving a trace in the fossil records is suffocation or hypothermia. Although tidal waves can be destructive it doesn't effect the entire planet.

according to the theory it was a heat wave from that rock that killed the dinos. Of course such a heat wave wouldn't leave any marks on the bones. The tidal wave was the last thing to hit anywhere since it was the slowest wave. heat and sound and water waves that is.

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according to the theory it was a heat wave from that rock that killed the dinos. Of course such a heat wave wouldn't leave any marks on the bones. The tidal wave was the last thing to hit anywhere since it was the slowest wave. heat and sound and water waves that is.

I spot a problem with the heat wave theory.

To raise global temperatures enough to kill the dinosaurs then that must be one very large and very hot fire going on around the impact crator. Such temperatures would leave geological evidence and yes evidence in the fossil records of the animals which died in that region and for a thousand miles around it.

However a normal heat wave could have wiped them out.

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It really does depend where the wave originated from.

The whole of the UK would be gone though, as would most of Western Europe if the 3 mile wave hit from a westerly direction, that's a given. However, whatever caused the wave would have been so massive that its other effects would dwarf the wave in comparison, so that would be the least of our worries.

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It really does depend where the wave originated from.

The whole of the UK would be gone though, as would most of Western Europe if the 3 mile wave hit from a westerly direction, that's a given. However, whatever caused the wave would have been so massive that its other effects would dwarf the wave in comparison, so that would be the least of our worries.

I dont know if you are aware of this but scientists think birds are the decendants of dinosaurs so they didn't really go extinct.

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I dont know if you are aware of this but scientists think birds are the decendants of dinosaurs so they didn't really go extinct.

Yea they mentioned that in the show yesterday. I am not too sure about that tho.

One of the problems I have with this is the idea that some birds are called raptures and some dinos are called dinos so they must be related. The problem is who named either of them.

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Posted (edited)

how far inland could a 3 mile high wave travel. I know that Australia would be completely swamped but what about Europe, Asia, north and south America, Africa. well we're at it the middle east.

I've been trying to find you an easy answer but there really isn't one. Tsunami waves are a result of a combination of different factors and their height and strength are dependant on where they make landfall. I did manage to find this little tidbit that may shed some light on your question though, it's from an article on the Chicxulub event.

Tsunami Deposits and Ejecta Layer

In contrast to the 2 to 3 cm thick clay layer found worldwide, the KT boundary in the Gulf of Mexico region and in Haiti is composed of much thicker coarse clastic deposits. Sand beds indicative of high energy deposition at the KT boundary at Brazos River, Texas, have been interpreted to be the result of a major disturbance of the depositional environment, such as a tsunami approximately 50 to 100 meters high [ Bourgeois et al., 1988].

The Chicxulub impact occurred at the tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, so using a good map you may be able to find out how far that is from Brazos River. Keep in mind though that due to plate tectonics the locations and extent of the seashore has changed since the time of the dinosaurs.

It should give you a bit of an idea how far the tsunami wave may have traveled though. :tu:

source: http://www.agu.org/revgeophys/claeys00/nod...000000000000000

And also the "Raptors" are a small group of meat eating dinosaurs, they have the most similarities to birds that's why they are believed to be their ancestors, and not say a triceratops. Do a google on bird evolution you should be able to come up with more info.

Edited by Shaftsbury

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thank you

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Posted (edited)

I found a simulation that you may want to have a look at, it gives you a better insight as to what is happening when a tsunami is triggered.

Tsunami Wave Simulator: http://www.seed.slb.com/flash/science/feat...&popup=true

*The simulation is cool but unfortunately we need to keep in mind it is based on a real disaster.

Edited by Shaftsbury

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I know that Australia would be completely swamped

Australia is a massive place, its a bit simple to say that Australia would be swamped from a 3mile high wave. Most tsunami reports/stories from aboriginals in the Sydney area however do not mention mega tsunami of that size, not even close. There are many accounts of asteroid impacts around 500-600 years ago off the south coast of New Zealand in which sydney basin aboriginals witnessed a 500m wide asteroid impact.

The first thing that occurs is a massive amount of heat (from friction) in the atmosphere so anything near the impact burns instantly resulting in massive bush fires. The asteroid then impacts into the ocean, however it explodes as it hits the water resulting in complete annihilation and some pretty insane temperatures. The result is a multi km wide "crater" of water vaporization. So think of this massive area of water, that in less than a second is no longer there because it has turned into steam. Ofcourse, the gap left is filled by the surrounding ocean and water fills back up into the void resulting in enormous pressure and a huge water spout that goes very, very high into the air then back down creating the wave that will then spread out and eventually create a tsunami.

Meanwhile all that water vapor spreads out into the atmosphere and creates rain clouds (in a way). Local aboriginals account water falling from the sky like they had never seen before (this is thousands of kms away from the impact zone).

The resulting tsunami that hit the east coast of Australia was not that big, yes it killed alot of people on the coast that lived in low lying flat areas. However the east coast varies ALOT and the Sydney area for instance is covered by cliff faces so barely anyone here died.

So, i went a bit off topic but i hope it helps as its a cool topic. However im just not convinced mega tsunami can get "that big". Sure a crab might be thrown 50km inland from a giant wave, but is the power behind the wave that big? is it really that high? or are mega tsunami merely <50m high waves that can travel great distances inland more like a flood than a traditional wave.

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