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New class of black hole discovered

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Image credit: NASA
Image credit: NASA
Astrophysicists have discovered what is believed to be a medium-sized black hole over 290 million light years away. The new class of black hole may help shed light on how supermassive black holes are formed.

"Only two sizes of black holes have ever been spotted: small and super-massive. Scientists have long speculated that an intermediate version must exist, but they’ve never been able to find one until now."

arrow3.gifView: Full Article | arrow3.gifSource: Wired

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One thing that really bothers me here is this is implying that black holes grow.

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Two things to say:

Firstly: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE ♫♥

Secondly: does this mean we're all going to die? :unsure2::P

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One thing that really bothers me here is this is implying that black holes grow.

wouldn't fusion with other black holes do so ?

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Its is answering old questions and creating new questions....

Thanks

B???

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Posted (edited)

wouldn't fusion with other black holes do so ?

That is the theory. Either that or a possible galactic vaccuum fight between each other, if it's angled right. I don't think anything like that was ever recorded to really confirm the effect. Well, as far as I know anyway.

Edited by :PsYKoTiC:BeHAvIoR:

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well a black hole doesn't grow in the conventional sense like a tree. It doesn't occupy more space .. it influences more space .. it's influence (event horizon grows). Which is for all intents and purpose - one and the same. A massive (super massive) black hole has greater inertia (reluctance to change it's motion - as acted upon by an outside force). A moving SM black hole would deflect less from it's straight-line trajectory in (passing another black hole) - than would a less massive black hole.

I hesitate to venture any further into: uncharted territory - re: relatavistic-jet expulsion rates and characteristic gravitaional gradients etc. I'm thinking the gravity gradient is probably constant - independent of black hole mass. The diameter of the event horizon is what differs. I'm guessing. Your thoughts??

linked-image

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