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1940's Bermuda mystery solved ?

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A new examination in to the mysterious disappearance of two planes over the Bermuda Triangle in the 1940's has suggested that one aircraft crashed due to technical failures while the second would have run out of fuel.

"Two of the so-called Bermuda Triangle's most mysterious disappearances in the late 1940s may have been solved. Scores of ships and planes are said to have vanished without trace over the decades in a vast triangular area of ocean with imaginary points in Bermuda, Florida and Puerto Rico. "

arrow3.gifView: Full Article | arrow3.gifSource: BBC News

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"What happened in this case will never be known and the fate of Star Tiger must remain an unsolved mystery."

I dint get that!

Thanks

PotterManiac

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A lot of speculation in that article.

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When FIRST I read the title I thought , Ah, some old wreckage found or some thing. But the question mark makes it speculative not factual. I guess I watch to much CSI on T.V. but I expected some kind of physical evidence and not more "Arm chair" research.

I feel SO JADED! :hmm:

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Ha! I knew it it! More speculation. 'what ifs' and more questions. The good ol' Triangle will hold on to her secrets yet again!

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Well, considering that the "Bermuda Triangle" was invented by a journalist on a slow news day, and the area it supposedly covers has never been exactly defined,(i.e. it any plane or boat that got lost anywhere in the North Atlantic was, according to the more excitable, swallowed up by it, it seems), I expect it'll hold onto its secrets a bit longer yet.

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I've been listening to Tom Mangold's BBC radio 4 series on the Bermuda Triangle for the past week and it has been absolutely fascinating. If you are in the UK, it can still be heard on the BBC iPlayer, but I don't think that actually works for people outside the UK, which is a shame.

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i don't think the Bermuda Triangle is a real mystery....

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Silly and you think an aircraft ran out of fuel and did not report You guys yet can not comprehend the human mind its the most sophisticates machine in the universe second to God's only

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Silly and you think an aircraft ran out of fuel and did not report You guys yet can not comprehend the human mind its the most sophisticates machine in the universe second to God's only

You dug up a four year old thread just to post that?

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Not an original thought from me but microbursts would appear to be a good fit for many of the disappearances, ships as well as plane.

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Just look at the coast of Australia. Hundreds of disappearances and wrecks. We even lost a yacht 'Nina' a week ago. No mystery. The ocean is dangerous place for the untrained, unwary or just plain unlucky. As an avid boater I've had a few close calls myself from bad luck or my own stupidity.

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Hardly 'solved'...There is only speculation in this article...

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