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The Lost Dutchman gold mine found ?

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Patrick Bernauw: One John V. Kemm states he has found the legendary Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, using Google Earth. According to some versions of the most famous lost mine in American history, the mine is either cursed, or protected by mysterious guardians. The Lost Dutchman is the stuff where true treasure hunts is made of…

Thousands of treasure hunters still try to locate the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, hidden somewhere in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, in Arizona. The mine is named after Jacob Waltz, a German immigrant (Dutchman was slang for German, derived from the German word Deutsch, meaning: German). There are at least four Lost Dutchmans to be found in the American West one in Colorado, one in California and the other two in Arizona. The earliest Lost Dutchman Gold Mine in Arizona was said to be near Wickenburg, where in the 1870s a Dutchman was found dead in the desert, together with some saddlebags filled with gold.

A brief history
Fact and fiction blend in these tales, becoming faction, but key elements are lost Apache gold, a Dutchman, a lost gold vein, found by US soldiers, a doctor and of course treasure maps. In The Story of Doctor Thorne, some Apaches are said to have found a very rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains; one of them is, in some versions of the story, the famous chief Geronimo. The family of one Miguel Peralta was said to have discovered the mine around 1850, but was attacked by the Apaches and slaughtered in the Peralta Massacre. Years later, dr Thorne treated a wounded Apache and was rewarded with a trip to the mine blindfolded. He was allowed to take as much gold ore as he could carry before, again blindfolded, being escorted from the site.

The mainstream tale of The Lost Dutchman involves two Germans, Jacob Waltz and Jacob Weiser but it is possible that there was only one single Dutchman named Waltz, Weitz, Weitzer… or something like that. In some versions the Germans are said to behave violently, in others they are peacefully fellows. Waltz and/or Weiser seem to have located a rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains, maybe with some help from a member of the Peralta family. Weiser is attacked by Apaches or by his greedy friend Waltz, but survives long enough to tell a doctor Walker about the mine. He is also said to have made a deathbed confession to Julia Thomas, and to have drawn some sort of treasure map.

The Lost Dutchman Tale would probably only have been a footnote in Arizonas history, if it was not for the death of treasure hunter Adolph Ruth. Ruths son Erwin seems to have learned of the Peralta Mine from a descendant of the Peraltas, who gave him some antique maps of the site. In the summer of 1931, while searching for the Lost Dutchman, Adolph Ruth suddenly disappeared. About a half year later, his skull was recovered with two bullet holes in it. Tantalizingly, his checkbook was also recovered, with a note in it claming that he had discovered the mine. Ruth gave detailed directions and ended his note with the motto of Julius Ceasar: Veni, vidi, vici! (I came, I saw, I conquered!)

Since the death of Adolph Ruth, there have been several other reports of mysterious deaths in the Superstition Mountains, so here are the origins to be found of another legendary tale: The Curse of the Superstition Mountains. I have written a series of articles on the mystery of The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, raising the question if these tales could have been connected with a Lost Aztec Treasure, where the stories about a Curse of the Superstition Mountains originated, and telling the legend of The Very Rich Mine of Juan Mondragon (New-Mexico). It was on these articles, published on the HubPages, that John V. Kemm commented.

The Lost Dutchman, Found with Google Earth?
John V. Kemm from Albuquerque N.M. stated that he had found the legendary Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, using Google Earth. On his very chaotic MySpace page and on the HubPage Account he opened (check out the address!) John V. Kemm asks everyone who surfes by to help him get his story out: the Lost Dutchman is found, the Peralta Maps are solved and he has located the gold. "Not allowing free speech", Photobucket and Jim Hatt of the Desert USA Message Board keep deleting his posts, so most of the links don't work - but this one still does:

http://s936.photobucket.com/albums/ad208/Truespectrum/?action=view&current=theheart.jpg

The key to the mystery seems to be one of the so-called Peralta Stone Maps: the Latin heart. According to John V. Kemm the Peralta Map is close to dead on till you reach the heart. Then you have to reverse the heart, or spin it to the right and a bit to the north too. From Weavers Needle, and from a specific angle, you can see now the hearts center. The upper left side is where the gold is, says Kemm. This can be verified on Google Earth. The exact coordinates are:

33°26'46.06"N 111°21'44.38"W 1847 m.

This could be a hoax, a nutcase or an alternate reality game… On his MySpace blog, Jim V. Kemm states that a long time ago the family name wasnt Kemm, but Quinto… and that Charles V, or Carlos Quinto, was his great-grandfather. This seemed to be the start of the fight between Kemm and Jim Hatt of the Desert USA Forum with Jim Hatt pointing out that Charles V/Carlos Quinto was born in the 1500s and politely asking if John V. Kemm is not missing some generations. But okay, you can check this out for yourself, I dont want to spoil the fun.

Copyright by Patrick Bernauw & Historical Mysteries.

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If he thinks he found it why would he be trying to tell everyone?

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He mostlikely owns an outtfitter`s Business in Arz . LoL.

Good Luck Treasure Hunters !

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This is the actual location:

N33° 33.603' W111° 20.276'

or not....

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Patrick Bernauw: One John V. Kemm states he has found the legendary Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, using Google Earth. According to some versions of the most famous lost mine in American history, the mine is either cursed, or protected by mysterious guardians. The Lost Dutchman is the stuff where true treasure hunts is made of…

Thousands of treasure hunters still try to locate the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, hidden somewhere in the Superstition Mountains, near Apache Junction, in Arizona. The mine is named after Jacob Waltz, a German immigrant (“Dutchman” was slang for “German”, derived from the German word “Deutsch”, meaning: “German”). There are at least four Lost Dutchmans to be found in the American West – one in Colorado, one in California and the other two in Arizona. The earliest Lost Dutchman Gold Mine in Arizona was said to be near Wickenburg, where in the 1870’s a Dutchman was found dead in the desert, together with some saddlebags filled with gold.

A brief history

Fact and fiction blend in these tales, becoming “faction”, but key elements are “lost Apache gold”, “a Dutchman”, “a lost gold vein, found by US soldiers”, a doctor and – of course – treasure maps. In “The Story of Doctor Thorne”, some Apaches are said to have found a very rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains; one of them is, in some versions of the story, the famous chief Geronimo. The family of one Miguel Peralta was said to have discovered the mine around 1850, but was attacked by the Apaches and slaughtered in the “Peralta Massacre”. Years later, dr Thorne treated a wounded Apache and was rewarded with a trip to the mine – blindfolded. He was allowed to take as much gold ore as he could carry before, again blindfolded, being escorted from the site.

The “mainstream” tale of The Lost Dutchman involves two Germans, Jacob Waltz and Jacob Weiser – but it is possible that there was only one single “Dutchman” named Waltz, Weitz, Weitzer… or something like that. In some versions the Germans are said to behave violently, in others they are peacefully fellows. Waltz and/or Weiser seem to have located a rich gold mine in the Superstition Mountains, maybe with some help from a member of the Peralta family. Weiser is attacked by Apaches or by his greedy friend Waltz, but survives long enough to tell a doctor Walker about the mine. He is also said to have made a deathbed confession to Julia Thomas, and to have drawn some sort of treasure map.

The Lost Dutchman Tale would probably only have been a footnote in Arizona’s history, if it was not for the death of treasure hunter Adolph Ruth. Ruth’s son Erwin seems to have learned of the Peralta Mine from a descendant of the Peralta’s, who gave him some antique maps of the site. In the summer of 1931, while searching for the Lost Dutchman, Adolph Ruth suddenly disappeared. About a half year later, his skull was recovered – with two bullet holes in it.  Tantalizingly, his checkbook was also recovered, with a note in it claming that he had discovered the mine. Ruth gave detailed directions and ended his note with the motto of Julius Ceasar: “Veni, vidi, vici!” (“I came, I saw, I conquered!”) 

Since the death of Adolph Ruth, there have been several other reports of mysterious deaths in the Superstition Mountains, so here are the origins to be found of another legendary tale: “The Curse of the Superstition Mountains”.  I have written a series of articles on the mystery of The Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, raising the question if these tales could have been connected with a Lost Aztec Treasure, where the stories about a Curse of the Superstition Mountains originated, and telling the legend of The Very Rich Mine of Juan Mondragon (New-Mexico). It was on these articles, published on the HubPages, that John V. Kemm commented.

The Lost Dutchman, Found with Google Earth?

John V. Kemm from Albuquerque N.M. stated that he had found the legendary Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, using Google Earth. On his very chaotic MySpace page and on the HubPage Account he opened (check out the address!) John V. Kemm asks everyone who surfes by to help him get his story out: the Lost Dutchman is found, the Peralta Maps are solved and he has located the gold. "Not allowing free speech", Photobucket and Jim Hatt of the Desert USA Message Board keep deleting his posts, so most of the links don't work - but this one still does:

http://s936.photobucket.com/albums/ad208/Truespectrum/?action=view&current=theheart.jpg

The key to the mystery seems to be one of the so-called Peralta Stone Maps: “the Latin heart”. According to John V. Kemm the Peralta Map is “close to dead on till you reach the heart”. Then you have to reverse the heart, or spin it to the right and a bit to the north too. From Weaver’s Needle, and from a specific angle, you can see now the heart’s center. “The upper left side is where the gold is,” says Kemm. “This can be verified on Google Earth.” – The exact coordinates are:

33°26'46.06"N 111°21'44.38"W – 1847 m.

This could be a hoax, a nutcase or an alternate reality game… On his MySpace blog, Jim V. Kemm states that a long time ago the family name wasn’t Kemm, but Quinto… and that Charles V, or Carlos Quinto, was his great-grandfather. This seemed to be the start of the fight between Kemm and Jim Hatt of the Desert USA Forum – with Jim Hatt pointing out that Charles V/Carlos Quinto was born in the 1500’s and politely asking if John V. Kemm is not missing some generations. But okay, you can check this out for yourself, I don’t want to spoil the fun.

Copyright by Patrick Bernauw & Historical Mysteries.

Over thirty years ago I and a friend hiked into the Superstition Mountains from the south, climbing out of the true desert and into a semi arid zone with a few trees. We walked all the way around Weaver's Needle (a volcanic neck), lost the trail on the way out, and managed to find our way out anyway. It was a strange area; we even found an abandoned tent. William B Stoecker

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If he thinks he found it why would he be trying to tell everyone?

That was my first thought. My guess is the guy is just trying to get traffic to his webpage.

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I don't see a heart on the map. Somebody please enlighten me.

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I heard this is government property and if you find the treasure, it will belong to the U.S. government.

You would get bragging rights only - no cash.

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Who knew Google Earth could see inside the earth?? I'm quite sure Google Earth can find pretty much any hole in the ground, but it can't tell you what's inside.

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It IS government land. People aren't even supposed to be out there in the desert-- not without a permit, anyway. They've had too many trespassing treasure-hunters die out there because they didn't take enough water with them, got lost and never made it out.

Last I'd heard, someone went through proper channels, got permitting, and found a mine thought to be the Lost Dutchman Mine back in 2004 or 2005.

... and I too wonder why someone would post coordinates to a possible treasure location in public. That sounds too fishy to me.

What makes this guy think he has THE mine, anyway? There are hundreds of old mines and shafts in the Superstition Mountains.

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I'm suspicous of anyone who says, "I found the lost gold mine!", myself. Why would you announce such a thing. It is like finding a bundle of $20 bills on the ground and then pointing it out to the other passersby, but not picking it up yourself.

I do not see a heart either. Or, rather, I see a lot of hearts in that sat-map. It is like looking for bigfoot or faieries in a picture of the woods. Your imagination can let you see whatever you want.

There is no mention of anyone finding it yet on Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Dutchman's_Gold_Mine

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I heard this is government property and if you find the treasure, it will belong to the U.S. government.

You would get bragging rights only - no cash.

Only if you told someone about it ;)

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Only if you told someone about it wink2.gif

Very true. But the Cash For Gold pawn shop might wonder why you keep showing up with gold all the time.

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