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Your Favorite Ghostwriter

Merlin's Doomsday Prophecies

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There are far more "Doomsday Chronicles" than the ones that are hyped now, featuring Nostradamus or the Mayan Calendar. They mostly regenerate very ancient symbols of religion, myth and magic and they don't forecast necessarily an Apocalypse 2012 scenario. One of the finest examples is Merlin's Doomsday Prophecy... But the good old wizard of the Arthurian legends has left us some other really fascinating predictions for the present era and End of the World visions too...

Full article: Merlin's Doomsday Chronicles

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There are far more "Doomsday Chronicles" than the ones that are hyped now, featuring Nostradamus or the Mayan Calendar. They mostly regenerate very ancient symbols of religion, myth and magic and they don't forecast necessarily an Apocalypse 2012 scenario. One of the finest examples is Merlin's Doomsday Prophecy... But the good old wizard of the Arthurian legends has left us some other really fascinating predictions for the present era and End of the World visions too...

Full article: Merlin's Doomsday Chronicles

Well, if anybody could prove that Merlin as such actually existed, this might be of some relevance, but evidence suggests otherwise.

First of all, Merlin itself :

Monmouth’s composite Merlin is based primarily on Myrddin Wyllt, also called Merlinus Caledonensis, and Aurelius Ambrosius, a mostly fictionalized version of the historical war leader Ambrosius Aurelianus. It's a composite persona, of several historical characters. His Historia Regum Britanniae, although a fine piece of medieval literature, is however never considered a work of history. Monmouth took quite some liberty with historical facts, so his writings are to be taken with caution.

9th century monk Nennius wrote also about a prophet called Merlin, yes, but when you read Nennius, you'll find sort of a sense of nationalist pride. It feels like he is trying to legitimize the people of Britain and embellish the past with the legends of the time. It's to be taken with caution as well.

I'll not say anything about Tolstoy, because I tend to give him more credit since he has actually some quite good arguments. Find here a link to an interview with him. Very, very interesting.

Bottom line is, nobody could agree on who Merlin actually is, most of the early sources about him are questionable. There are several sources for the said prophecies as well, there is the "Prophetiae Merlini" written by Monmouth, the 12th-century poem written in Latin hexameters by John of Cornwall, to name but two.

As a literary excercise, I find the character of Merlin fascinating, because of this life of his own he seems to take. As far as historical fact and prophecies go, sorry, I'm not buying it.

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