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redfox11

3D-models of Puma Punku stone blocks

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Hi! First - sorry for my bad knowledge of English, actually i`m from Russia.

Puma Punku is a very strange place, and blocks are like LEGO from the first look..

In order to research this fact, i began to create 3D-models of all block, may be it could be usefull for all who are interested in the ruins of Puma Punku.

Models I'm doing, based on drawings from the book "Die Ruinenstätte von Tiahuanaco im Hochlande des alten Peru"

(The Ruins of Tiahuanaco in the Highlands of Ancient Peru) by Alphons Stubel and Max Uhle, 1892.

I also use numerous photographs, if I have doubts about the accuracy of the size or measurement error.

In order to catalog the model, I introduced the concept of "Stubel Catalog", in which each block has its own number. For example, Figure 1.

The main objective - promotion of archeology, ancient architecture. And also to enable people of different professions to participate in the study of Puma Punku.

The model of each block is presented in two formats, Google SketchUp 7 (*.skp) and *.dwg.

Here's a ready-made model, the rest I will spread as I`ll finish them.

3D models of Puma Punku blocks

101166.jpg102190.jpg71487.jpg

117721.jpg79826.jpg114640.jpg

126783.jpg123711.jpg

Edited by redfox11

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128816.jpg79834.jpg

103400.jpg119557.jpg

Edited by redfox11
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hey redfox11, i would like to make some 3D models by myself, Where do you get you original source of (The Ruins of Tiahuanaco in the Highlands of Ancient Peru), is there a copy of this book in a pdf document available?

greets from germany

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Welcome to UM Redfox.

I never realised how similar lego and the stones of PP actually are, good point. I think that the fact that they didn't use mortar, makes it the more plausible and logical way to build though.

Good job on the renderings btw. :tu:

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Hi everyone!

Here is current result of my work, 3d models Fig.1 - Fig. 26, Fig.29 - Fig.32

3D_models

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Hi everyone!

Here is current result of my work, 3d models Fig.1 - Fig. 26, Fig.29 - Fig.32

3D_models

Hello such, the issue I am very interested, download the file where you need more figures of 27, 28, 30, and more models, but if like me pass me the book where more images are missing, please, to create 3D-models of all block.

Jorge

3D Designer

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Hello such, the issue I am very interested, download the file where you need more figures of 27, 28, 30, and more models, but if like me pass me the book where more images are missing, please, to create 3D-models of all block.

Jorge

3D Designer

P.D. Link http://ia600507.us.archive.org/11/items/Kiss-Edmund-Das-Sonnentor-von-Tihuanako/KissEdmund-DasSonnentorVonTihuanakoUndHoerbigersWelteislehre1937197S.Text.pdf

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Of all the UMs I wonder about this is one of the top 5 easily.

It is something I really would like to see in person someday.

And red, your english is fine. Better than some 'merkins I know.

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Of all the UMs I wonder about this is one of the top 5 easily.

It is something I really would like to see in person someday.

And red, your english is fine. Better than some 'merkins I know.

Just remember: those stones were carved from red sandstone, NOT granite or diorite (as the fringe want you to believe).

Beautiful and accurate as they are, they are not impossible to reproduce right now.

Even with primitive tools.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Just remember: those stones were carved from red sandstone, NOT granite or diorite (as the fringe want you to believe).

Beautiful and accurate as they are, they are not impossible to reproduce right now.

Even with primitive tools.

.

I know they're red sandstone -all the bigger ones anyway. The entire feat is still a mystery to me.

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Oh my god, this is amazing! Thanks for doing this, it makes you wonder what it looked like when it was still standing.

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Very cool! For hard stones like granite you use soft metals and for soft stone carving you use hard metals. Sounds counter intuitive but that's how I learnt how to carve stone and I learnt from 2 of australia's best masons. Granite is not as hard to carve/sculpt as is made out.

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:lol: never heard so much cobblers in all my life.

I take it you remember their names ?

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Of all the UMs I wonder about this is one of the top 5 easily.

It is something I really would like to see in person someday.

And red, your english is fine. Better than some 'merkins I know.

I agree. There IS NO explanation for Puma Punku.

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Very cool! For hard stones like granite you use soft metals and for soft stone carving you use hard metals. Sounds counter intuitive but that's how I learnt how to carve stone and I learnt from 2 of australia's best masons. Granite is not as hard to carve/sculpt as is made out.

would you mind elaborating what you mean by "hard" or "soft" metals ?

mind letting us know who this "two of australia's best masons" are ?

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I know they're red sandstone -all the bigger ones anyway. The entire feat is still a mystery to me.

Personally I think that Sacsayhuamán is a greater mystery, but no one ever mentions it.

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Personally I think that Sacsayhuamán is a greater mystery, but no one ever mentions it.

I started a topic about that type ,and size, of stonework once, but no one seemed mystified then.

This was the first response i got :lol:

What do you need explained? Do you think the Inca were too stupid or too primitive to cut stone well, or are you going to try to convince us that your some manner of expert stonecutter and you /know/ it couldn't have been done by them with the tools available? I wasn't aware craftsmanship was an insoluble mystery.

--Jaylemurph

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I started a topic about that type ,and size, of stonework once, but no one seemed mystified then.

This was the first response i got :lol:

You started a thread that lasted for 9 pages, lol.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=162569&hl=sacsayhuaman&st=0

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would you mind elaborating what you mean by "hard" or "soft" metals ?

mind letting us know who this "two of australia's best masons" are ?

For sandstone I used to use a plain steel chisel - that is what I'd call a hard metal. I never really carved much granite but Ive seen carbide tipped chisels before. They are a hard chisel though. I just remember being told to use a softer metal for granite (manganese?) but that could be wrong or for a particular effect. I suspect ancient egypt had iron tools. Maybe they even knew about the properties of diamonds. Larger cuts could be made by splitting rather than sawing.

Chris Bennets from Ishi Buki and Richard Stutchbury. They are sculptors, not really Masons I suppose, but do some good work. Especially Chris. He carves lots of animals and native flora including huge frogs and lizards that are very cool and has a massive relief in the Parliament House.

I only ever did small sculptures or modified natural rocks out in the bush. To do bigger work you need kanga's (small jackhammers).

Some weathered sandstone is so soft you can carve it really easy though with rasps!

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For sandstone I used to use a plain steel chisel - that is what I'd call a hard metal. I never really carved much granite but Ive seen carbide tipped chisels before. They are a hard chisel though. I just remember being told to use a softer metal for granite (manganese?) but that could be wrong or for a particular effect. I suspect ancient egypt had iron tools. Maybe they even knew about the properties of diamonds. Larger cuts could be made by splitting rather than sawing.

Chris Bennets from Ishi Buki and Richard Stutchbury. They are sculptors, not really Masons I suppose, but do some good work. Especially Chris. He carves lots of animals and native flora including huge frogs and lizards that are very cool and has a massive relief in the Parliament House.

I only ever did small sculptures or modified natural rocks out in the bush. To do bigger work you need kanga's (small jackhammers).

Some weathered sandstone is so soft you can carve it really easy though with rasps!

Thanks, it all boils down to the final 'look' or feel of the finished design/sculpture

With granite or the harder rocks you would use the softer metal tools because of long term damage to your joints, not because the rock is better to cut with the softer metal tools, as with the softer rocks, harder metal tools makes for better use in the long term as you would spend less time pounding it.

So the use of the metal tools depends on the kind of work that is needed, the kind of tools for the right kind of job, not stone, if you used soft metal tools on hard rocks you'll loose more tools if not your joints before the sculpture is done.

I like the works of Ishi Buki, :tu:

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Thank you suppling those names Dragonwind. :tu:

I've read so much tosh on this site from people who should know better when it comes to stone work, some of which is laughable at the very least and not warrented a reply, so I thought I'd to call your bluff. :P Sorry :P

Am at work atm so will reply to you more fully when I have more time. :tu:

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I never really carved much granite but Ive seen carbide tipped chisels before. They are a hard chisel though. I just remember being told to use a softer metal for granite (manganese?) but that could be wrong or for a particular effect.

Sorry my reply has taken a quite a while, but I needed to speak to the ol' man, a retired and 'old school' stone mason, before replying to your post :)

It's taken me a while, due to the fact that I need to pick the right moment when asking him a question about stone work as any reply can last about hour and at points can go way above my head :lol:.

Needless to say, although retired for quite a few years now, he still lives and breathes stone and the art/skill of stone masonry. When it comes to stone work there isn't much he doesn't know be it ancient or modern-day techniques. In fact ancient techniques are still used to this day for those that are willing to pay the price ( mainly heritage sites ) although those skills are quickly eroding due to, amongst other things, bad techniques/training, the use of air tools and machines, pay, costs and people that are actually capable of doing the work.

As already mentioned, the ol' man is now retired having spent over 40 years bashing the stuff. He has had the privilege of working on many well known buildings within the UK such as St Pauls Catherdal, Westminster Abbey to name but a few including world heritage sites such as Canterbury Cathedral etc.

With reference to my question regarding asking for names, there are a few of his previous trainees that have emigrated to Australia who are capable of top quality work by hand. Hence why the last time he heard from them they were working on governmental and other important historical sites within Australia.

To reply to your quote, these days to carve granite by hand you need tempered steel ( yet another disappearing skill to produce correctly ) or carbide tipped tools. Why you would choose to use anything softer in this day and age is beyond his comprehension. Not only will granite ruin softer metals within a very short period, the cost of replacement tools and time to produce a piece of work would be prohibitive gaining nothing on the finished article.

He now suffers from 'White finger' due to the constant vibration through the use hand tools and later day air tools. Unfortunately this can be the nature of the beast in this line of work and goes with the territory .............all his joints are still fine though having used suitable tools for the job. :tu:

I posted this in another thread if you missed it. Here's a guy hand carving granite, it comes in three parts and hopefully proves my point. :tu:

Edited by Banksy Boy

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Just watched 'Ancient Aliens' on the History Channel, they describe these being made of granite and diorite. That channel gives out a lot of false information.

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Well, there is a guy who appears on Ancient Aliens called Roger Hopkins who says he's been a Stone Mason for over 40 years IIRC.

In one of the programs he shows some of the granite work with perfect angles, shapes and inside cuts etc.

Why would a guy of his standing lie about the stone that is being shown?

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