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Waspie_Dwarf

In Memoriam

175 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Former astronaut Alan Poindexter dies in accident

Former NASA astronaut Alan Poindexter died Sunday from injuries sustained in a jet ski crash in Florida. He was 50 years old.

Poindexter, a two-time space shuttle flier, was jet skiing with his sons near Pensacola Beach, Fla., when the accident occurred, according to local media reports.

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Posted (edited)

NASA Extends Sympathy to Poindexter Family on Death of Former Astronaut

Former NASA astronaut and space shuttle commander Alan "Dex" Poindexter died while on vacation with his family July 1 in Pensacola, Fla. A veteran of two spaceflights, Poindexter spent a total of 28 days in space.

Poindexter, a U.S. Navy captain, commanded the STS-131 space shuttle Discovery mission to the International Space Station in 2010, delivering more than 13,000 pounds of hardware and equipment. He was the pilot for shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission that delivered and installed the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory on the station in 2008.

"Alan and I joined the astronaut corps in 1998 and flew together on STS-122, which was truly an incredible experience," said NASA Associate Administrator for Education and former astronaut Leland Melvin. "He was a passionate, caring and selfless individual who will be missed by all."

"We in the astronaut family have lost not only a dear friend, but also a patriot of the United States," said Peggy Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston. "He proudly served his country for 26 years as a fighter pilot, test pilot, astronaut and commander of a space shuttle. I am proud to have both flown in space and worked with him for so many years. Dex will be deeply missed by those of us at Johnson and the entire NASA family."

Poindexter earned an undergraduate degree with highest honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and a graduate degree from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. He was selected as an astronaut candidate in June 1998 and served in the Astronaut Office, Shuttle Operations Branch at Johnson as the lead support astronaut for NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. He also served as a spacecraft communicator, or CAPCOM, for multiple missions.

"Dex was a wonderful human being and a pleasure to have in the astronaut office," Janet Kavandi, fellow astronaut and Director of Flight Crew Operations said. "His good-natured demeanor made him approachable to his crews and the many people at Johnson and Kennedy who enabled his missions."

Poindexter retired from NASA and the astronaut corps in 2010 and returned to serve in the United States Navy as Dean of Students at the Naval Postgraduate School.

For Poindexter's complete biography, visit http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/poindexter.html.

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NASA Offers Condolences on the Passing of Pioneering Astronaut Sally Ride

In a space agency filled with trailblazers, Sally K. Ride was a pioneer of a different sort. The soft-spoken California physicist broke the gender barrier 29 years ago when she rode to orbit aboard space shuttle Challenger to become America’s first woman in space.

"Sally Ride broke barriers with grace and professionalism – and literally changed the face of America’s space program," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. "The nation has lost one of its finest leaders, teachers and explorers. Our thoughts and prayers are with Sally's family and the many she inspired. She will be missed, but her star will always shine brightly."

“Sally was a personal and professional role model to me and thousands of women around the world,” said NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver. “Her spirit and determination will continue to be an inspiration for women everywhere.”

Ride’s contribution to America’s space program continued right up until her death at age 61 this week. After two trips to orbit aboard the shuttle, she went on an award-winning academic career at the University of California, San Diego, where her expertise and wisdom were widely sought on matters related to space. She holds the distinction of being the only person to serve as a member of both investigation boards following NASA’s two space shuttle accidents. She also served as a member of the Review of U.S. Human Spaceflight Plans Committee, also known as the Augustine Committee, in 2009, which informed many of the decisions about NASA’s current human spaceflight programs.

However, Ride’s place in history was assured on June 18, 1983 when she rocketed into space on Challenger’s STS-7 mission with four male crewmates.

“The fact that I was going to be the first American woman to go into space carried huge expectations along with it,” Ride recalled in an interview for the 25th anniversary of her flight in 2008. “That was made pretty clear the day that I was told I was selected as a crew. I was taken up to Chris Kraft’s office. He wanted to have a chat with me and make sure I knew what I was getting into before I went on the crew. I was so dazzled to be on the crew and go into space I remembered very little of what he said.”

“On launch day, there was so much excitement and so much happening around us in crew quarters, even on the way to the launch pad,” Ride said. “I didn’t really think about it that much at the time . . . but I came to appreciate what an honor it was to be selected to be the first to get a chance to go into space.”

Ride joined NASA as part of the 1978 astronaut class, the first to include women. She and five other women, along with 29 men, were selected out of 8,000 applicants. The class became known as the “Thirty-Five New Guys” and reported to the Johnson Space Center the next summer to begin training. Ride trained for five years before she and three of her classmates were assigned to STS-7. The six-day mission deployed two communications satellites and performed a number of science experiments.

Following that historic flight, Ride returned to space on another shuttle mission, STS-41G in 1984. The 8-day mission deployed the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, conducted scientific observations of Earth, and demonstrated potential satellite refueling techniques. She was assigned to a third flight, but transitioned to a role on the Rogers Commission that investigated the Challenger accident after that shuttle was lost in January 1986. When the investigation was completed, she accepted a job as a special assistant to the NASA administrator for long range and strategic planning.

Ride left NASA in August 1987 to join the faculty at the University of California, San Diego, as a professor of physics and director of the University of California’s California Space Institute. In 2001, she founded her own company, Sally Ride Science, to pursue her long-time passion of motivating girls and young women to pursue careers in science, math and technology.

A native of Los Angeles, Ride graduated from high school there in 1968 and enrolled at Stanford University. At Stanford, she earned four degrees, including a doctorate in physics in 1978. She also was an accomplished athlete who played varsity tennis at Stanford after being nationally ranked as a youth.

Ride received numerous honors and awards during the course of her career. Most notably, she was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame and the Astronaut Hall of Fame, and received the Jefferson Award for Public Service, the von Braun Award, the Lindbergh Eagle, and the NCAA’s Theodore Roosevelt Award.

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Hail and Farewell, Sally Ride. :cry:

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Statement by the President on the Passing of Sally Ride

Michelle and I were deeply saddened to hear about the passing of Sally Ride. As the first American woman to travel into space, Sally was a national hero and a powerful role model. She inspired generations of young girls to reach for the stars and later fought tirelessly to help them get there by advocating for a greater focus on science and math in our schools. Sally’s life showed us that there are no limits to what we can achieve and I have no doubt that her legacy will endure for years to come. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Sally’s family and friends.

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Yes, her star will shine brightly.

Thank you, Sally...for being here, and for contributing all you did.

Godspeed, Dr. Ride.

:tu: :tu: :tu::tsu:

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We shall all remember these brave souls ! I look up and see only the Stars and the Good in Makkind !

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Posted (edited)

Sir Bernard Lovell

7th August 2012

sirbernardlovellmed.jpg

Sir Bernard Lovell.

Image credit: The University of Manchester.

It is with great regret that we announce that Sir Bernard Lovell OBE FRS died yesterday 6th August 2012 at the age of 98.

Sir Bernard, Emeritus Professor of Radioastronomy, was the founder and first Director of The University of Manchester’s Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire.

Born in 1913 in Oldland Common, Gloucestershire, Sir Bernard studied at the University of Bristol before coming to Manchester to work in the Department of Physics in 1936. During the Second World War, Sir Bernard led the team that developed H2S radar, work for which he was later awarded the OBE.

Sir Bernard returned to the Manchester Physics Department in 1945 and began work on cosmic rays using ex-military radar equipment. He brought this equipment to a University botany site at Jodrell Bank in late 1945, founding the world-famous Observatory which now exists here.

Jodrell Bank is dominated by the 76-metre Lovell Telescope, conceived by Sir Bernard. He worked with engineer Sir Charles Husband to build the telescope which has become an icon of British science and engineering and a landmark in the Cheshire countryside.

A hugely ambitious project, the telescope was by far the world's largest when it was completed in 1957 and within days tracked the rocket that carried Sputnik 1 into orbit, marking the dawn of the space age. It is still the third largest steerable telescope in the world and a series of upgrades mean it is now more capable than ever, observing phenomena undreamt of when it was first conceived.

Today the Lovell Telescope plays a key role in world-leading research on pulsars, testing our understanding of extreme physics including Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.

In 2011, Jodrell Bank Observatory was placed on the UK Government’s shortlist for World Heritage Site status, recognising its unique role in the development of our understanding of the Universe.

The Observatory continues to play a major role in astronomical research. It is now home to the e-MERLIN array of seven radio telescopes spread across the UK. Based on the techniques of linking telescopes over long distances pioneered by the team which Sir Bernard assembled at Jodrell Bank, the network is now connected by a high-speed optical fibre network making it one of the most powerful telescope arrays in the world.

Later this year the international headquarters of the SKA Organisation will move to Jodrell Bank. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world’s largest telescope. Combining thousands of dishes and other receivers spread across thousands of kilometres, the SKA itself will be sited in Africa and Australia.

Over the last seven decades, many hundreds of scientists and engineers have worked and trained at Jodrell Bank, often going on to work at other observatories across the world. Jodrell Bank has also inspired generations of schoolchildren who have visited the Observatory to pursue careers in science, engineering and medicine.

In person, Sir Bernard was warm and generous. He is survived by four of his five children, fourteen grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren. He retained a keen interest in the development of science at Jodrell Bank and beyond. Indeed he continued to come in to work at the Observatory until quite recently when ill health intervened. Outside the world of science he was an accomplished musician, playing the organ at the Swettenham Church for many years. He was also a keen cricketer, captain of the Chelford Cricket Club and past President of the Lancashire County Cricket Club. He was also renowned internationally for his passion for arboriculture, creating arboretums at both The Quinta and Jodrell Bank itself.

Sir Bernard’s legacy is immense, extending from his wartime work to his pioneering contributions to radio astronomy and including his dedication to education and public engagement with scientific research. A great man, he will be sorely missed.

A Book of Condolence has been opened at the Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre. There is also an online Book of Condolence for those not able to visit the Observatory in person.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Background information

Sir Bernard wrote many books about Jodrell Bank and astronomy in general, notable amongst these being 'The Story of Jodrell Bank' published in 1968.

Sir Bernard’s 1958 BBC Reith Lectures on 'The Individual and the Universe': (5/6), (6/6)

Video interviews with Sir Bernard for the Web of Stories.

Audio recording of an interview with Sir Bernard in 2007 : Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 (originally broadcast on The Jodcast).

Contacts

Jodrell Bank Observatory, telephone 01477 571321.

Source: Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
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Sir Bernard Lovell

7th August 2012

sirbernardlovellmed.jpg

Sir Bernard Lovell.

Image credit: The University of Manchester.

It is with great regret that we announce that Sir Bernard Lovell OBE FRS died yesterday 6th August 2012 at the age of 98.

Sir Bernard, Emeritus Professor of Radioastronomy, was the founder and first Director of The University of Manchester’s Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire.

Born in 1913 in Oldland Common, Gloucestershire, Sir Bernard studied at the University of Bristol before coming to Manchester to work in the Department of Physics in 1936. During the Second World War, Sir Bernard led the team that developed H2S radar, work for which he was later awarded the OBE.

Sir Bernard returned to the Manchester Physics Department in 1945 and began work on cosmic rays using ex-military radar equipment. He brought this equipment to a University botany site at Jodrell Bank in late 1945, founding the world-famous Observatory which now exists here.

Jodrell Bank is dominated by the 76-metre Lovell Telescope, conceived by Sir Bernard. He worked with engineer Sir Charles Husband to build the telescope which has become an icon of British science and engineering and a landmark in the Cheshire countryside.

A hugely ambitious project, the telescope was by far the world's largest when it was completed in 1957 and within days tracked the rocket that carried Sputnik 1 into orbit, marking the dawn of the space age. It is still the third largest steerable telescope in the world and a series of upgrades mean it is now more capable than ever, observing phenomena undreamt of when it was first conceived.

Today the Lovell Telescope plays a key role in world-leading research on pulsars, testing our understanding of extreme physics including Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.

In 2011, Jodrell Bank Observatory was placed on the UK Government’s shortlist for World Heritage Site status, recognising its unique role in the development of our understanding of the Universe.

The Observatory continues to play a major role in astronomical research. It is now home to the e-MERLIN array of seven radio telescopes spread across the UK. Based on the techniques of linking telescopes over long distances pioneered by the team which Sir Bernard assembled at Jodrell Bank, the network is now connected by a high-speed optical fibre network making it one of the most powerful telescope arrays in the world.

Later this year the international headquarters of the SKA Organisation will move to Jodrell Bank. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world’s largest telescope. Combining thousands of dishes and other receivers spread across thousands of kilometres, the SKA itself will be sited in Africa and Australia.

Over the last seven decades, many hundreds of scientists and engineers have worked and trained at Jodrell Bank, often going on to work at other observatories across the world. Jodrell Bank has also inspired generations of schoolchildren who have visited the Observatory to pursue careers in science, engineering and medicine.

In person, Sir Bernard was warm and generous. He is survived by four of his five children, fourteen grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren. He retained a keen interest in the development of science at Jodrell Bank and beyond. Indeed he continued to come in to work at the Observatory until quite recently when ill health intervened. Outside the world of science he was an accomplished musician, playing the organ at the Swettenham Church for many years. He was also a keen cricketer, captain of the Chelford Cricket Club and past President of the Lancashire County Cricket Club. He was also renowned internationally for his passion for arboriculture, creating arboretums at both The Quinta and Jodrell Bank itself.

Sir Bernard’s legacy is immense, extending from his wartime work to his pioneering contributions to radio astronomy and including his dedication to education and public engagement with scientific research. A great man, he will be sorely missed.

A Book of Condolence has been opened at the Jodrell Bank Discovery Centre. There is also an online Book of Condolence for those not able to visit the Observatory in person.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Background information

Sir Bernard wrote many books about Jodrell Bank and astronomy in general, notable amongst these being 'The Story of Jodrell Bank' published in 1968.

Sir Bernard’s 1958 BBC Reith Lectures on 'The Individual and the Universe': (5/6), (6/6)

Video interviews with Sir Bernard for the Web of Stories.

Audio recording of an interview with Sir Bernard in 2007 : Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 (originally broadcast on The Jodcast).

Contacts

Jodrell Bank Observatory, telephone 01477 571321.

Source: Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics

Lovell5_640x480.jpg

The Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank.

One of the greatest telescopes on the planet, named for one of the greatest astronomers.

Thank you, Sir Bernard, for your 98 years of life and accomplishment and inspiration to us all.

You shall be sorely missed.

:tu:

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You shall be sorely missed.

That he will, but he stands in that elite group, those that built their own monument, and what a monument it is.

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That he will, but he stands in that elite group, those that built their own monument, and what a monument it is.

Concur, Waspie.

It's a stunning thing.

Only a Knight could build such a thing! :tsu:

:tsu:

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Concur, Waspie.

It's a stunning thing.

Only a Knight could build such a thing! :tsu:

:tsu:

And its good we still have a few Knights left around !

This is a wonderful thread ! Hats off to all our explorers !

post-68971-0-07808000-1345592119_thumb.j

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And its good we still have a few Knights left around !

This is a wonderful thread ! Hats off to all our explorers !

To call this a wonderful thread is a really poor choice of words. I hate every post I have to make here. Every new entry is another life ended.

It maybe the most worthwhile thread I contribute too, and the people it commemorates may have achieved wonderful thread, but there is nothing wonderful about having to report their deaths.

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I accept your judgement Waspie.

I shall also say this--

While I agree that each time you post new material on this thread it means someone has passed, and that in itself isn't the most wonderful thing to be doing...

...Each thread you contribute to is a worthwhile thread, simply because your intellect and character are included therein!

:tu:

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To call this a wonderful thread is a really poor choice of words. I hate every post I have to make here. Every new entry is another life ended.

It maybe the most worthwhile thread I contribute too, and the people it commemorates may have achieved wonderful thread, but there is nothing wonderful about having to report their deaths.

THe wonder will never replace the Loss of our Great explorers thats a fact ,But to teach others that a loss of these great people is well passed on to the NExt Generations ! And without the acknowledgment of such loss Its a real shame to Not Shout out For these people. So It is a wonderful thread !

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US astronaut Neil Armstrong dies, first man on Moon

US astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man to set foot on the Moon, has died at the age of 82, US media report.

Earlier this month he had surgery to relieve blocked coronary arteries.

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the prayer left on the moon

James Benson Irwin (March 17, 1930 – August 8, 1991) was an American astronaut. He served as Lunar Module pilot for Apollo 15, the fourth human lunar landing; he was the eighth human to walk on the Moon, and he was the first of those astronauts to die.[

I Am There

James Dillet Freeman

shareyourpoem.gif

Do you need Me ?

I am there.

You cannot see Me, yet I am the light you see by.

You cannot hear Me, yet I speak through your voice.

You cannot feel Me, yet I am the power at work in your hands.

I am at work, though you do not understand My ways.

I am at work, though you do not understand My works.

I am not strange visions. I am not mysteries.

Only in absolute stillness, beyond self, can you know Me

as I AM, and then but as a feeling and a faith.

Yet I am here. Yet I hear. Yet I answer.

When you need ME, I am there.

Even if you deny Me, I am there.

Even when you feel most alone, I am there.

Even in your fears, I am there.

Even in your pain, I am there.

I am there when you pray and when you do not pray.

I am in you, and you are in Me.

Only in your mind can you feel separate from Me, for

only in your mind are the mists of "yours" and "mine".

Yet only with your mind can you know Me and experience Me.

Empty your heart of empty fears.

When you get yourself out of the way, I am there.

You can of yourself do nothing, but I can do all.

And I AM in all.

Though you may not see the good, good is there, for

I am there. I am there because I have to be, because I AM.

Only in Me does the world have meaning; only out of Me does the world take form; only because of ME does the world go forward.

I am the law on which the movement of the stars

and the growth of living cells are founded.

I am the love that is the law's fulfilling. I am assurance.

I am peace. I am oneness. I am the law that you can live by.

I am the love that you can cling to. I am your assurance.

I am your peace. I am ONE with you. I am.

Though you fail to find ME, I do not fail you.

Though your faith in Me is unsure, My faith in you never

wavers, because I know you, because I love you.

Beloved, I am there.

This poem received a lot of attention in 1971 when it was taken to the moon by astronaut James B. Irwin on Apollo 15. Irwin's mother gave it to him before the flight and he actually left a copy of the poem on the moon.

http://www.inspirationpeak.com/cgi-bin/poetry.cgi?record=12

Edited by docyabut2

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NASA Administrator Statement on Neil Armstrong's Death

The NASA press release is reproduced below:

August 25, 2012

Bob Jacobs/David Weaver

NASA Headquarters

202-358-1600

bob.jacobs@nasa.gov/david.s.weaver@nasa.gov

RELEASE : 12-601

NASA Administrator Statement on Neil Armstrong's Death

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden regarding the death of former test pilot and NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong. He was 82.

“On behalf of the entire NASA family, I would like to express my deepest condolences to Carol and the rest of Armstrong family on the passing of Neil Armstrong. As long as there are history books, Neil Armstrong will be included in them, remembered for taking humankind's first small step on a world beyond our own.

“Besides being one of America’s greatest explorers, Neil carried himself with a grace and humility that was an example to us all. When President Kennedy challenged the nation to send a human to the moon, Neil Armstrong accepted without reservation.

"As we enter this next era of space exploration, we do so standing on the shoulders of Neil Armstrong. We mourn the passing of a friend, fellow astronaut and true American hero."

Additional information about Armstrong is available on the Web at:

http://www.nasa.gov

http://www.neilarmstronginfo.com

- end -

___________________________

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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FAMILY STATEMENT REGARDING THE DEATH OF NEIL ARMSTRONG

The NASA press release is reproduced below:

August 25, 2012

Bob Jacobs/David Weaver

NASA Headquarters

202-358-1600

bob.jacobs@nasa.gov/david.s.weaver@nasa.gov

RELEASE : 12-600

FAMILY STATEMENT REGARDING THE DEATH OF NEIL ARMSTRONG

WASHINGTON -- The following is a statement from the Armstrong family regarding the death of former test pilot and NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong. He was 82.

“We are heartbroken to share the news that Neil Armstrong has passed away following complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures.

Neil was our loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend.

Neil Armstrong was also a reluctant American hero who always believed he was just doing his job. He served his Nation proudly, as a navy fighter pilot, test pilot, and astronaut. He also found success back home in his native Ohio in business and academia, and became a community leader in Cincinnati.

He remained an advocate of aviation and exploration throughout his life and never lost his boyhood wonder of these pursuits.

As much as Neil cherished his privacy, he always appreciated the expressions of good will from people around the world and from all walks of life.

While we mourn the loss of a very good man, we also celebrate his remarkable life and hope that it serves as an example to young people around the world to work hard to make their dreams come true, to be willing to explore and push the limits, and to selflessly serve a cause greater than themselves.

For those who may ask what they can do to honor Neil, we have a simple request. Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink.”

Additional information about Armstrong is available on the Web at:

http://www.nasa.gov

- end -

___________________________

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I'm still stunned at the news Waspie

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Statement from Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 lunar module pilot, regarding the passing of Neil Armstrong

From Spaceref.com

Source: NASA HQ Posted Saturday, August 25, 2012

armstrong.paint.s.jpg

"I am very saddened to learn of the passing of Neil Armstrong today. Neil and I trained together as technical partners but were also good friends who will always be connected through our participation in the Apollo 11 mission. Whenever I look at the moon it reminds me of the moment over four decades ago when I realized that even though we were farther away from earth than two humans had ever been, we were not alone. Virtually the entire world took that memorable journey with us. I know I am joined by millions of others in mourning the passing of a true American hero and the best pilot I ever knew. My friend Neil took the small step but giant leap that changed the world and will forever be remembered as a landmark moment in human history. I had truly hoped that in 2019, we would be standing together along with our colleague Mike Collins to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of our moon landing. Regrettably, this is not to be. Neil will most certainly be there with us in spirit.

"On behalf of the Aldrin family, we extend our deepest condolences to Carol and the entire Armstrong family. I will miss my friend Neil as I know our fellow citizens and people around world will miss this foremost aviation and space pioneer."

Cz

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In memory of all the astronauts that died and to remember the prayer that was left on the moon.

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From Whitehouse.gov - Aug. 27, 2012

Presidential Proclamation -- Death of Neil Armstrong

DEATH OF NEIL ARMSTRONG

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

As a mark of respect for the memory of Neil Armstrong, I hereby order, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, that on the day of his interment, the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset on such day. I also direct that the flag shall be flown at half-staff for the same length of time at all United States embassies, legations, consular offices, and other facilities abroad, including all military facilities and naval vessels and stations.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-seventh day of August, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

BARACK OBAMA

Cz

Edited by Czero 101

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From Whitehouse.gov - Aug. 25, 2012

Statement by the President on the Passing of Neil Armstrong

Michelle and I were deeply saddened to hear about the passing of Neil Armstrong.

Neil was among the greatest of American heroes - not just of his time, but of all time. When he and his fellow crew members lifted off aboard Apollo 11 in 1969, they carried with them the aspirations of an entire nation. They set out to show the world that the American spirit can see beyond what seems unimaginable - that with enough drive and ingenuity, anything is possible. And when Neil stepped foot on the surface of the moon for the first time, he delivered a moment of human achievement that will never be forgotten.

Today, Neil's spirit of discovery lives on in all the men and women who have devoted their lives to exploring the unknown - including those who are ensuring that we reach higher and go further in space. That legacy will endure - sparked by a man who taught us the enormous power of one small step.

Cz

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Thanks to all of you for your wonderful comments!

Edited by MID

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