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Karlis

Some of History's Most Destructive Volcanoes

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The eruption of a volcano on the island nation of Iceland on Saturday is a result of the tectonic processes that have continuously shaped and re-shaped the Earth's surface for billions of years. While the eruption has not been a major one so far, it did cause residents in the surrounding areas to evacuate, as they wait to see if the volcano will continue to spew lava and ash or quiet back down.

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Volcanoes, and their tectonic sources are some of the most powerful forces known on the planet. Capable of both creating and destroying, we have such a tentative relationship with them. It is entirely probable that there would be no life on Earth without them.

And if we didn't have a tectonically active planet we certainly wouldn't have some of the amazing landscapes we do today.

Anyway, back to Iceland. They are lucky this is a minor eruption at this specific volcano. If (as has happened in the past) that this eruption could trigger another at a larger volcano nearby that is situated under a glacier.

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Yep, that's actually how the North Sea formed. A basalt flow in the north flowed out of the ocean and the crust actually sank under the weight of basalt, forming the abyssal plains of the Sea. Iceland is the only above-water remnant of this basalt flow, and due to its prime situation along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it has a pretty nicely geologically active area.

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Yep, that's actually how the North Sea formed. A basalt flow in the north flowed out of the ocean and the crust actually sank under the weight of basalt, forming the abyssal plains of the Sea. Iceland is the only above-water remnant of this basalt flow, and due to its prime situation along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, it has a pretty nicely geologically active area.

Are you sure you mean the North Sea? As it is actually part of the continental shelf, devoid of an abyssal plain. And was formed due to the Mid-Atlantic ridge creating a rift (the Atlantic) which essentially caused the UK to uplift, leaving an epicontinental sea (North Sea) in an interglacial period due to higher sea level.

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