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thefinalfrontier

The Eridanus Void: Is It a Monster Black Hole

18 posts in this topic

The apparent development of a large void of some billion light-years in diameter in the Constellation Eridanus appears to be improbable given current cosmological models. A radical and controversial theory proposes that it is a "universe-in-mass black hole" rather than hypothetical dark matter responsible for the phenomenon described as the expanding-accelerating universe. This radical theory of cosmology suggests that stars at the edge of the Hubble length universe are being consumed by a universe-in-mass black hole.

In August of 2007, astronomers at the University of Minnesota located a gigantic hole in the universe.

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A radical and controversial theory indeed,

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Wow, cool find, TFF. Looks like something out of Star Trek.

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Wow, cool find, TFF. Looks like something out of Star Trek.

What makes me wonder about is if this theory turns out to be a fact then what is feeding a black hole one billion LY accross? I mean a billion light years is a mind blowing estimate so that leads me to wonder what this monster could it be possibly eating.

IDK But it is an interesting theory and its also very controversial,

Just imagine what man will see once the WEBB telescope is sent up to replace hubble,

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Posted (edited)

Wouldn't that be far more obvious? As in, galaxies within a few schwartzchild radii of such an object would be moving at appreciable fractions of lightspeed, either inwards from gravity or sideways to avoid being eaten. Not to mention the gravitational lensing it would cause... Not buying it, at least not in the form the popular article states. Especially considering the incredibly inaccurate assesment of VIRGOHI21 in the article as having "created the virgo cluster".

* EDIT * Having now looked at the article at the Journal of Cosmology, I would not trust that source very much at all. They seem to suffer from several gross misapprehensions about the big bang theory and the observations that support an accelerating universe...

Edited by Torgo

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I agree with Torgo.

Also, note how none of the real scientists say it is a ``black hole''.

Lawrence Rudnick's 2007 paper on the subject (published in ApJ 671 40, preprint available from arXiv) never once mentions the possibility of the observed void being a black hole.

I think the author of the article in The Daily Galaxy is either ignorantly or willfully misinterpreting the word `void' as `black hole' to spin his own pet theories.

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Wouldn't that be far more obvious? As in, galaxies within a few schwartzchild radii of such an object would be moving at appreciable fractions of lightspeed, either inwards from gravity or sideways to avoid being eaten. Not to mention the gravitational lensing it would cause... Not buying it, at least not in the form the popular article states. Especially considering the incredibly inaccurate assesment of VIRGOHI21 in the article as having "created the virgo cluster".

* EDIT * Having now looked at the article at the Journal of Cosmology, I would not trust that source very much at all. They seem to suffer from several gross misapprehensions about the big bang theory and the observations that support an accelerating universe...

sepulchrave

I agree with Torgo.

Also, note how none of the real scientists say it is a ``black hole''.

Lawrence Rudnick's 2007 paper on the subject (published in ApJ 671 40, preprint available from arXiv) never once mentions the possibility of the observed void being a black hole.

I think the author of the article in The Daily Galaxy is either ignorantly or willfully misinterpreting the word `void' as `black hole' to spin his own pet theories.

Yes, can not argue that point guys, Totally agree with you both, Seems the daily galaxy is an on the fringe news site to me,

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This concept makes Unicron devouring planets a joke.

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not possible with such size if we calculate the amount of energy that it required. but then who know?

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I like how they explained Dark Energy very interesting but i agree with what was said above

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i find this theory absolutely terrifying

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It's God's house. The place where He keeps the holographic projector. I hope He doesn't trip over the cord and pull the plug.

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A bit scary indeed. :unsure2:

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A bit scary indeed. :unsure2:

Not really. If there were a black hole a billion light years across (there isn't, see above) you probably wouldn't notice if the Solar system fell into it.

The event horizon of very very large black holes is simply a point of no return; you can't get back out of it but the space-time curvature is too gradual to tear you to pieces.

If you fell across the horizon of a black hole a billion light years across it would take millions (if not billions) of years until you were crushed.

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Not really. If there were a black hole a billion light years across (there isn't, see above) you probably wouldn't notice if the Solar system fell into it.

The event horizon of very very large black holes is simply a point of no return; you can't get back out of it but the space-time curvature is too gradual to tear you to pieces.

If you fell across the horizon of a black hole a billion light years across it would take millions (if not billions) of years until you were crushed.

have you read The Black Hole War by Leonard Susskind? I recommend to anyone here who is interested in black holes. He talks about what you said in your post, for example

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have you read The Black Hole War by Leonard Susskind?

No, I haven't. I'll have to check it out.

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what? the bigger the black hole the larger the event horizon? that doesnt even make sense. you would be torn to shreds no matter what. it would still compact you and galaxies into elementary particles and it wouldnt take longer. the event horizon is like a line where the parts of you that enter it first are torn off of you. sure time would stand still in the event horizon but not for anyone watching. they would see you ripped to shreds layer millimeter by millimeter. and time would slow the closer you got to it for you but not for anyone watching. relativity.

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also i was thinking about that paragraph that states the huge black hole would gobble everything up and then just exist as a huge singularity in a giant void. but would it?

wouldnt it be more likely to be a singularity with time-space curved so severely that there would be no 3 dimensions outside of the singularity?

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what? the bigger the black hole the larger the event horizon? that doesnt even make sense.

I'm not sure what you think you know about black holes, but the event horizon is the ``size'' of the black hole. In the simple, non-rotating case the radius of the black hole's event horizon is proportional to the mass of the black hole.

you would be torn to shreds no matter what. it would still compact you and galaxies into elementary particles and it wouldnt take longer. the event horizon is like a line where the parts of you that enter it first are torn off of you.

Eventually you would be compacted. The event horizon is simply the point of no return.

Sure, if you let half your body cross the event horizon and had your upper half attached to something that could instantly pull you back with a ridiculous amount of force you would get ripped in half (of course even if you weren't near a black hole a ridiculous force suddenly applied to half of your body might still rip you in half).

If you are free-falling into a black hole the thing that rips you apart are tidal forces, i.e. the difference between the pull of gravity at your feet and at your head. Although the gravitational force near the event horizon of a supermassive black hole is large, the gradient of this force can easily be mild enough that it won't rip you apart.

sure time would stand still in the event horizon but not for anyone watching. they would see you ripped to shreds layer millimeter by millimeter. and time would slow the closer you got to it for you but not for anyone watching. relativity.

Actually the opposite is true. A person will fall into a black hole in finite proper time, but to an outside observer it will look like they never cross the event horizon. This is because the closer you are to the event horizon the longer it takes the light from you to escape to reach the outside observer.

In this, as in many things, Wikipedia is your friend.

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