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Riaan

[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood

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Not everything you don't understand is wrong, Knul.

Your selfmade etymologies can not be taken seriously.

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I said you posted about it, not that it was your theory.

I know you had it from that dictionary.

If a new overold text is discovered (or accepted to be authentic), much of that "official dictionary" may have to be re-edited.

This did not happen in the case of the OLB, because no one could proof its authenticity. On the contrary its so-called authenticity has been proven false. Not just on linguistic grounds, but for many reasons. All of them show, that the narrative has been composed in the mid 19th century and that the hoax was made of it by Over de Linden and Stadermann.

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Reading your posts once is more than enough. I know you both don't know.

If you want to be taken seriously, you should stop presenting your beliefs as if they are facts.

Beware me to be taken seriously by some Otharus, who is continously turning the facts to his believe.

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Wrong again Otharus ! lek is not leak in the expression lek and brek, but English lack, brek is not breuk but gebrek.

I think it's pretty obvious that LEK, LEAK and LACK are etymologically related, as well as BREK, GEBREK, BREAK and BREUK.

But I will leave the conclusion to every individual reader.

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The facts speak for themselves. There is no Otharus who can change them.

I asked you to present these 'facts'.

That the OLB dating of the flood would be based on old almanacs is an assumption, not a fact.

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There is no Oldfrisian word pampyr, only papier.

There is, but I ment 'old school'-Frisian:

pampier: 1816, 1824, 1882

1816 De hudde Wijn dij hie wat proesd / En onder de Pampieren poesd. P.G. DEKETH, pijtter, strofenr. 46

1824 Ho earm binne wij oon marcken, omme for-schaette, heegjende in leegjende luwden ... op it pampier mielje to kinnen. R. POSTHUMUS, prieuwcke, XIII

1882 Pieter (is) oan de doar ... in greate rol pampier ûnder de earm. P.J. TROELSTRA, wiersizzery, (6)

Source: http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article&wdb=WFT&id=74583.re.d1e4142723&lemma=pampier

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Your selfmade etymologies can not be taken seriously.

Not without an IQ, indeed.

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This did not happen in the case of the OLB, because no one could proof its authenticity. On the contrary its so-called authenticity has been proven false. Not just on linguistic grounds, but for many reasons.

All of this so-called proof was systematically refuted in this threat.

All of them show, that the narrative has been composed in the mid 19th century and that the hoax was made of it by Over de Linden and Stadermann.

Please inform us when you have found a specialist who takes your theory seriously.

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There is, but I ment 'old school'-Frisian:

One more escape. So when you speak about Oldfrisian, we must believe that you mean old school Frisian (whatever that is).

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All of this so-called proof was systematically refuted in this threat.

Please inform us when you have found a specialist who takes your theory seriously.

Nothing has been refuted unless by turning facts to your disbelieve.

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So when you speak about Oldfrisian, we must believe that you mean old school Frisian (whatever that is).

I gave my source. I don't know a clear definition of "Oldfrisian".

"In slang, old school can refer to anything that is from an earlier era. Old school refers to something that is fairly old and not very recent." (wiki)

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Not without an IQ, indeed.

I know, that you think you are twice as intelligent. But alas !

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Venus and Aphrodite

Venus is named after the Roman goddess of love and peace. To the Greeks this was Aphrodite, to the Egyptians the goddess Isis and to the Phoenicians the goddess Astrate. She was associated with the metal copper (from Cyprus, which was Aphrodite's birthplace), a flattish triangle, the number five, the colour blue, and the day Friday. The Saxons used the name of their fertility goddess, Fria, which led to the English name of Friday, whereas the French name Vendredi indicates its Greek-Latin origin.

http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/vt-2004/Background/Infol2/EIS-D9.html

Fria or Frya seems to be Aphrodite - which would be Venus.

vt2004-if14-fig1.jpg

aFRIAdite - 1st woman (Greeks) - born fully formed - daughter of Ouranos, a sky God (probably Wralda).

vt2004-if14-fig2-small.jpg

I said before I thought Aphrodite might mean 'first day' or first deity, as in a child of the sky and gaia (irtha).

Frya might be day. Bright, white, with blue eyes (sky). Signalled in by Venus.

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Pompe is pump.

Etymology 1From Middle French, of Germanic origin, from Middle Dutch pompe (device for raising water, pump). Related to Middle Low German pumpe (a pump). More at pump.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pompe

Bledar imo is blood.

pump blood = heart

250px-Frisian_flag.svg.png

120px-Flag_ommelanden.gif

It consists of four blue and three white diagonal stripes; in the white stripes are a total of seven red pompeblêden, stylised heart-shaped leaves of yellow water-lily.

Those yellow water lily leaves look like 'hearts' to me.

I don't think pompebleden actually means water lily leaves - but rather, hearts.

-----------------

Anda ôra syde thêre Skelda hwêr hja tomet tha fêrt fon alle sêa haeve,

thêr mâkath hja hjvd dêgon skriffilt fon pompa blêdar,

thêr mith sparath hja linnent ut aend 'kaennath hja vs wel miste.

On the other side of the Scheldt, where from time to time there come

ships from all parts, they make now paper from pumpkin leaves, by which they save flax and outdo us

pompa bledar = pumpkin leaves - so this might be 'water lily leaves' - as 'hearts' - known in Frisia as the yellow water lily..??

Edited by The Puzzler

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It is described in the OLB, that the lamp (foddik) is placed in the top of the towers. So the towers had a function in navigation on sea (and were not used to watch the stars) as is still the case on Texel, Vlieland, Walcheren. Probably a similar tower has been built in Liudgarde (Leeuwarden) at the Middelzee. The hexagonal form has been developed to make the tower less damaged by storms, later the hexagonal form is replaced by round forms.

From the OLB:

NOW I WILL WRITE MYSELF, FIRST ABOUT MY CITADEL, AND THEN ABOUT WHAT I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SEE.

My city lies near the north end of the Liudgaarde. The tower has six sides, and is ninety feet high, flat-roofed, with a small house upon it out of which they look at the stars.

(...)

All the other burghs are the same shape as ours, only not so large; but the largest of all is that of Texland. The tower of the Fryasburch is so high that it rends the sky, and all the rest is in proportion to the tower.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Reading your posts once is more than enough. I know you both don't know.

If you want to be taken seriously, you should stop presenting your beliefs as if they are facts.

It's true that I don't know how that date of 2194 BC came into being, but let's say I am busy trying to find out.

Maybe the two of you should do the same instead of filling pages on end with bickering.

My problem is that I don't know what astrological ephemerids (sun/moon/planet tables) were available in the 19th century. They knew a lot, even centuries before that, but even the slightest deviation or inaccuray in those tables will give a (many) decades large deviation if you are going to try to calculate a position of the planets for 4000 years before your time.

Now they use very accurate software, and using that they came to a date around 2000 BC.

+++

dw013.jpg

Edited by Abramelin

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Pompe is pump.

Etymology 1From Middle French, of Germanic origin, from Middle Dutch pompe (“device for raising water, pump”). Related to Middle Low German pumpe (“a pump”). More at pump.

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pompe

Bledar imo is blood.

pump blood = heart

250px-Frisian_flag.svg.png

120px-Flag_ommelanden.gif

It consists of four blue and three white diagonal stripes; in the white stripes are a total of seven red pompeblêden, stylised heart-shaped leaves of yellow water-lily.

Those yellow water lily leaves look like 'hearts' to me.

I don't think pompebleden actually means water lily leaves - but rather, hearts.

-----------------

Anda ôra syde thêre Skelda hwêr hja tomet tha fêrt fon alle sêa haeve,

thêr mâkath hja hjvd dêgon skriffilt fon pompa blêdar,

thêr mith sparath hja linnent ut aend 'kaennath hja vs wel miste.

On the other side of the Scheldt, where from time to time there come

ships from all parts, they make now paper from pumpkin leaves, by which they save flax and outdo us

pompa bledar = pumpkin leaves - so this might be 'water lily leaves' - as 'hearts' - known in Frisia as the yellow water lily..??

I have also wondered why those (national) yellow flowers changed into red and looked like hearts. Are there still old flags/emblems around with these flowers still being yellow?

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Etymology 2 From Middle French, from Old French pompe (“extravagant ceremony, pomp”), from Latin pompa (“display, procession, parade”), from Ancient Greek πομπή (pompē, “procession, send-off”), from πέμπω (pémpou, “I send”).

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pompe

I send - letter - pampier? I saw Lettre in that other one - letter/pampier seemed to have a commonality - maybe pompe.

make it from pompe bledar - make it from what? hearts? water lily leaves? pumpkin leaves? pumping/pulping bladder???

bladder

O.E. blædre (W.Saxon), bledre (Anglian) "bladder," also "blister, pimple," from P.Gmc. *blaedron (cf. O.N. blaðra, O.H.G. blattara, Du. blaar), from PIE *bhle- (see blast).

Edited by The Puzzler

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Venus and Aphrodite

Venus is named after the Roman goddess of love and peace. To the Greeks this was Aphrodite, to the Egyptians the goddess Isis and to the Phoenicians the goddess Astrate. She was associated with the metal copper (from Cyprus, which was Aphrodite's birthplace), a flattish triangle, the number five, the colour blue, and the day Friday. The Saxons used the name of their fertility goddess, Fria, which led to the English name of Friday, whereas the French name Vendredi indicates its Greek-Latin origin.

http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/vt-2004/Background/Infol2/EIS-D9.html

Fria or Frya seems to be Aphrodite - which would be Venus.

vt2004-if14-fig1.jpg

aFRIAdite - 1st woman (Greeks) - born fully formed - daughter of Ouranos, a sky God (probably Wralda).

vt2004-if14-fig2-small.jpg

I said before I thought Aphrodite might mean 'first day' or first deity, as in a child of the sky and gaia (irtha).

Frya might be day. Bright, white, with blue eyes (sky). Signalled in by Venus.

That is of course the first everybody thinks of, that that 'watchstar' of Frya must be Venus.

But then what is Finda's watchstar? And why didn't they assign one to Lyda?

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It's true that I don't know how that date of 2194 BC came into being, but let's say I am busy trying to find out.

Maybe the two of you should do the same instaed of filling pages on end with bickering.

My problem is that I don't know what astrological ephemerids (sun/moon/planet tables) were available in the 19th century. They knew a lot, even centuries before that, but even the slightest deviation or inaccuray in those tables will give a (many) decades large deviation if you are going to try to calculate a position of the planets for 4000 years before your time.

Now they use very accurate software, and using that they came to a date around 2000 BC.

The various almanaks give basic astronomy information about positions of stars, sun and moon.

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The various almanaks give basic astronomy information about positions of stars, sun and moon.

That is not nearly enough.

I talk about an ephemeris, planet tables used to calculate the position of sun, moon, planets and varous other heavenly features (Caput Draconis, Caudis Draconis, ""fixed stars" and so on) for a certain point in time.

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I have also wondered why those (national) yellow flowers changed into red and looked like hearts. Are there still old flags/emblems around with these flowers still being yellow?

The people from Groningen tell, that their flag with hearts has been borrowed by the Frisians and changed to the pompebledar because of Hamconius. The official flag shows two lions. The Frisian flag with pompebledar is still informal.

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Ah, you were first...

"with a small house upon it out of which they look at the stars"

The original fragment [106/16]:

EN LÍTH HUSKE THÉR VPPA. HWÁNA MAN THA STÀRA BISJATH

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Ah, you were first...

The original fragment [106/16]:

EN LÍTH HUSKE THÉR VPPA. HWÁNA MAN THA STÀRA BISJATH

"BISJATH" is "beschouwt" in Dutch, or "observes" in English.

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From the OLB:

NOW I WILL WRITE MYSELF, FIRST ABOUT MY CITADEL, AND THEN ABOUT WHAT I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO SEE.

My city lies near the north end of the Liudgaarde. The tower has six sides, and is ninety feet high, flat-roofed, with a small house upon it out of which they look at the stars.

(...)

All the other burghs are the same shape as ours, only not so large; but the largest of all is that of Texland. The tower of the Fryasburch is so high that it rends the sky, and all the rest is in proportion to the tower.

.

They may have looked at the stars, but the air in Holland is mostly cloudy and not as bright as in Egypt. I think most knowledge here comes from Copernicus. s. http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolaas_Copernicus.

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