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Riaan

[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood

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Hello anyone, I am a 200% sure I saw some stone/tombstone/whatever-stone created by Over de Linden, and with the word "WAK" ("watch") inscribed on it.

Can't find it right now.

.

It appears to be a coat of arms.

Anyone?

++++++

EDIT:

Found it:

OverdeLinden_familiewapen.jpg

OverdeLinden_familiewapen2.jpg

Over de Linden had made the coat of arms himself (from old coins), and it showed 3 lime trees near a watering hole. At the bottom it says "WAK" in OLB script.

http://argyf.fryske-akademy.eu/files/fa/faciliteiten/universitaire-frisistiek/collegestof-om-down-te-loaden/coll06_olb_ed_inleiding_9-54.pdf

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Yes, I found that too, but Knul means "state" in the meanning of 'nation', not some private property or estate.

It is an oldfrisian word, and in the OLB it is not used in the meaning of 'nation'.

His argument is invalid, AS ALWAYS.

There is not a single word or expression, used in OLB that would disprove its authenticity.

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It is an oldfrisian word, and in the OLB it is not used in the meaning of 'nation'.

His argument is invalid, AS ALWAYS.

There is not a single word or expression, used in OLB that would disprove its authenticity.

Just a few of the many examples from the OLB:

THE BOOK OF ADELA’S FOLLOWERS.

Thrittich jêr aeftere dêi that thju folksmoder wmbrocht was thrvch thêne vreste Mâgy stand et er aerg vm to. Alle stâta thêr-er lidsa anda ôre syde thêre Wrsara, wêron fon vs ofkêrth aend vnder-et weld thes Magy kêmen, aend-et stand to frêsane, that er weldig skolde wertha vr-et êlle lând.

Thirty years after the day on which the Volksmoeder was murdered by the feared Magy, was a time of great distress. All the states that lie on the other side of the Weser had been wrested from us, and had fallen under the power of Magy, and it looked as if his power was to become supreme over the whole land.

THE BOOK OF ADELA’S FOLLOWERS.

Jesterdêi wêron-er mong jo tham allet folk to hâpa hropa wilde vmb tha âstlike stâta wither to hjara plyga to tvangande.

Yesterday there were among you those who would have called the whole people together, to compel the eastern states to return to their duty.

USEFUL EXTRACTS FROM THE WRITINGS LEFT BY MINNO.

Ne dvath maen nên rjucht men vnrjucht, alsa rist thêr twist aend twispalt emong tha maenniska aend stâta.

If instead of doing right, men will commit wrong, there will arise quarrels and differences among people and states.

THESE ARE THE THREE PRINCIPLES ON WHICH THESE LAWS ARE FOUNDED

3. Alrek wêt thaet-i fry aend vnforlêth wil lêva, aend that ôre that âk wille. Umbe sekur to wêsande send thesa setma aend domar makad.

Thaet folk Findas heth âk setma aend domar: men thissa ne send navt nêi tha rjucht, men allêna to bâta thêra prestera aend forsta, thana send hjara stâta immerthe fvl twispalt aend mord.

3. Every man knows that he wishes to live free and undisturbed, and that others wish the same thing.

To secure this, these laws and regulations are made.

The people of Finda have also their rules and regulations, but these are not made according to what is just—only for the advantage of priests and princes—therefore their states are full of disputes and murder.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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It appears to be a coat of arms.

Anyone?

++++++

EDIT:

Found it:

OverdeLinden_familiewapen.jpg

OverdeLinden_familiewapen2.jpg

Over de Linden had made the coat of arms himself (from old coins), and it showed 3 lime trees near a watering hole. At the bottom it says "WAK" in OLB script.

http://argyf.fryske-akademy.eu/files/fa/faciliteiten/universitaire-frisistiek/collegestof-om-down-te-loaden/coll06_olb_ed_inleiding_9-54.pdf

.

Must be my eyes again, but do you all see this thing, after WAK: ~ ??

WAK.jpg

Knul claims that this ~ - a tilde - that shows up between lines in the OLB is only meant for printing purposes, but what has printing to do with this metal coat of arms??

Over de Linden was really in love with the tilde:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/30467/30467-h/images/p066.gif

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I know these fragments. State or estate is a plausible (and close to orig.) translation. But how would that prove that the text is new?

Imagine, a 'new' oldfrisian text is discovered and proven to be authentic.

It is a few hundred pages long, and older than any known oldfrisian text.

Would it be intelligent to expect and demand that it only has words in it that are already known from the texts we have and in the exact same meaning that we know them?

Wouldn't it be very possible that we would discover that some words and expressions are actually older than we thought?

Edited by Otharus

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I know these fragments. State or estate is a plausible (and close to orig.) translation. But how would that prove that the text is new?

Imagine, a 'new' oldfrisian text is discovered and proven to be authentic.

It is a few hundred pages long, and older than any known oldfrisian text.

Would it be intelligent to expect and demand that it only has words in it that are already known from the texts we have and in the exact same meaning that we know them?

Wouldn't it be very possible that we would discover that some words and expressions are actually older than we thought?

In some of the many fragments I could have used from the OLB 'estate' could be a possible translation, but in some of the ones I posted 'nation' is the only logical option.

==

The problem with 'modern' words showing up in a manuscript that is supposed to be millennia old, is that in much more recent manuscripts these words are never used in that meaning.

Like: 3000 years ago XXX meant 1234, then 2000 years later XXX meant 4567, and then again just a few centuries ago it suddenly meant 1234 again.

That is not very likely to happen.

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Notice the OLB for the letter -A- and -W-.

Hypothesis: VV = W = ω = Ω

I suspect that the oldfrisian VV (double 'ooh', as in 'pooh') became the greek O-mega (big 'o').

I have suggested this before.

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The problem with 'modern' words showing up in a manuscript that is supposed to be millennia old, is that in much more recent manuscripts these words are never used in that meaning.

Like: 3000 years ago XXX meant 1234, then 2000 years later XXX meant 4567, and then again just a few centuries ago it suddenly meant 1234 again.

That is not very likely to happen.

I don't think it's very unlikely to happen.

Just imagine a trend-setter who uses a word in a very old or oldfashioned meaning, and others take over.

The same word can have slightly different meanings in different regions.

We see that often with European languages, but even in various dialects.

Anyway, it's not a hard case, as all of them.

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Hypothesis: VV = W = ω = Ω

I suspect that the oldfrisian VV (double 'ooh', as in 'pooh') became the greek O-mega (big 'o').

I have suggested this before.

Everything you always wanted to know about... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W

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No, I never did, but I know I always wanted to visit it one day.

And look at what it says:

A conjunction of planets occurred on 8 May 1774. Before it happened, people insisted that these planets would collide with one another, the result being that the earth would be pulled from its orbit and incinerated in the sun. Eise Eisinga wanted to show that there was no reason for panic.

http://www.planetarium-friesland.nl/engels.html

Btw, I did find software (Dutch/English) and I have been busy casting horscopes for several months of 2194 BC... and there's definately something going on there...

Alewyn suggested that a comet impacted in the Indian Ocean (Burckle Crater), and he said the date was Ocktober 21.

Well, based on astrology, I cane to Oktober 23 (click on the thumbnail for full size):

th_OLB_Bombay_2194BC_noon.gif

I'm a bit slow, still back at the horoscope.

I'm not exactly sure how to read your chart but here's pretty much what it means as well, this is the sky, 21st October 2193BC - looking West to North West as the Suns begins to set and Venus would have started to become visible in the evening, 4 pm.

Map211021934pmjpg.jpg

The cluster is Venus, Mercury and Jupiter as the Sun is in Scorpio, at the end of Libra and they are actually in Orphiuchus, not used general in Western astrology but an intriging 'zodiac' sign.

Mars in Libra could be a factor in the laws being extablished because of wars.

Mercury the messenger, Hermes, with Venus and Jupiter, Pluto wouldn't count for much.

I took this screen shot so you could also see North and to the Pole - the Ursa's are not yet near and Draco is in the garden, I mean Pole Circle.

Thuban is the closest Pole Star, barely seen in some areas, not a bright star at all.

Due to the precession of Earth's rotational axis, Thuban was the naked-eye star closest to the north pole from 3942 BC, when it moved farther north than Theta Boötis, until 1793 BC, when it was superseded by Kappa Draconis. It was closest to the pole in 2787 BC, when it was less than two and a half arc-minutes away from the pole. It remained within one degree of true north for nearly 200 years afterwards, and even 900 years after its closest approach, was just five degrees off the pole. Thuban was considered the pole star until about 1900 BC, when the much brighter Kochab began to approach the pole as well.

Having gradually drifted away from the pole over the last 4,800 years, Thuban is now seen in the night sky at a declination of 64° 20' 45.6", RA 14h 04m 33.58s. After moving nearly 47 degrees off the pole by 10000 AD, Thuban will gradually move back toward the north celestial pole. In 20346 AD, it will again be the pole star, that year reaching a maximum declination of 88° 43' 17.3", RA 19h 08m 54.17s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thuban

A declination in the sky, indicated by Plato as the Phaethon myth, may be no more than the Pole Star falling from it's point.

All those little things grouped around that area are Comets actually.

Virgo is also there, maybe she is even Vesta, as it fits, Virgo is really Astraea, who owns the scales of justice (Libra). It's an interesting night sky, that's for sure.

---------

I must say, the WAK coat-of-arms is quite a find Abe.

Edited by The Puzzler

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I'm a bit slow, still back at the horoscope.

I'm not exactly sure how to read your chart but here's pretty much what it means as well, this is the sky, 21st October 2193BC - looking West to North West as the Suns begins to set and Venus would have started to become visible in the evening, 4 pm.

Map211021934pmjpg.jpg

The cluster is Venus, Mercury and Jupiter as the Sun is in Scorpio, at the end of Libra and they are actually in Orphiuchus, not used general in Western astrology but an intriging 'zodiac' sign.

Mars in Libra could be a factor in the laws being extablished because of wars.

Mercury the messenger, Hermes, with Venus and Jupiter, Pluto wouldn't count for much.

I took this screen shot so you could also see North and to the Pole - the Ursa's are not yet near and Draco is in the garden, I mean Pole Circle.

Thuban is the closest Pole Star, barely seen in some areas, not a bright star at all.

Due to the precession of Earth's rotational axis, Thuban was the naked-eye star closest to the north pole from 3942 BC, when it moved farther north than Theta Boötis, until 1793 BC, when it was superseded by Kappa Draconis. It was closest to the pole in 2787 BC, when it was less than two and a half arc-minutes away from the pole. It remained within one degree of true north for nearly 200 years afterwards, and even 900 years after its closest approach, was just five degrees off the pole. Thuban was considered the pole star until about 1900 BC, when the much brighter Kochab began to approach the pole as well.

Having gradually drifted away from the pole over the last 4,800 years, Thuban is now seen in the night sky at a declination of 64° 20' 45.6", RA 14h 04m 33.58s. After moving nearly 47 degrees off the pole by 10000 AD, Thuban will gradually move back toward the north celestial pole. In 20346 AD, it will again be the pole star, that year reaching a maximum declination of 88° 43' 17.3", RA 19h 08m 54.17s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thuban

A declination in the sky, indicated by Plato as the Phaethon myth, may be no more than the Pole Star falling from it's point.

As Virgo is also there, maybe she is even Vesta, as it fits, Virgo is really Astraea, who owns the scales of justice (Libra). It's an interesting night sky, that's for sure.

---------

I must say, the WAK coat-of-arms is quite a find Abe.

To start with your last remark: I knew it existed because I have seen it online before, but not the pdf I linked to in my post.

But what especially intrigued me is that tilde right behind WAK...

If you go check Wiki on that tilde, you'll read that the tilde is also used as a form of sarcasm when placed right behind a word/last word.

But I do not know when that use of the tilde started.

-

I wouldn't start interpreting the astrological chart if I were you. Btw: Pluto was not even discovered in the 19th century, so it won't help us to imagine what someone in the 19th century or earlier might have thought/expected (btw btw: Pluto is nowadays seen as the 'ruler' of Scorpio, and no modern astrologer would say that Pluto entering its own sign wouldn't count for much, lol).

Both your and my charts were calculated using modern software, and you can bet that even then there is a deviation from the true planetary positions back then.

==

The Pole star slowly shifting away from its position over thousands of years would hardly be seen as a dramatic event like you are suggesting with the Phaeton myth. Unless you adopt Alewyn's idea of a comet impact causing the earth's axis to tilt.

==

Another thing to consider if you really want to interpret your 'night-sky': your map is the actual astronomical map of the skies; that means that every planet and sun and moon are a sign 'off' when compared to an astrological chart.. and which happens to be one of the main arguments of science against astrology.

++++++

GOD!: you used October 21, 2193 BC, not 2194 BC !!

I thought: how can Mars be in Libra in her chart?? Lol.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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This is what I quoted from that Swiss Ephemeris:

"The year -2193 astronomical counting style corresponds to year 2194 B.C.E historical counting style."

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Thach nêi min ynfalda myning skolde thât falikant utkvmma.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

My translation in old Dutch-ish:

Doch na(ar) mijn eenvuldige (http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/eenvoudig) mening zoude dat scheef uitkomen.

Sandbach:

According to my humble opinion, they would have made a great mistake.

My translation into English:

Though, to my humble opinion, it would turn out skewed.

Faliekant = crooked, not straight/ skewed, sloping / wrong

Faliekant is generally seen as a medieval combination of the French "faille" = false and the Dutch "kant" is side'.

Another way to explain this word is by using an old, 13th century form: 'valkant', literally "drop side".

De Bo, 1236: valkant schuins (Schuerm. Bijv. 352).

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/faliekant'>http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/faliekant

Btw, the Old Ducth word "falie" has nothing to do with this word:

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/falie (falie = cloak)

I have considered the OLB word "falikant" as an anachronism in the OLB, but I think I was wrong.

This is my explanation of why I think I was.

"Valkant" could have been an ancient carpenter's word.

tri_hypotenuse.gif

It's the hypothenuse.

=

Compare this word with "film". I - any many here with me - pronounce that word as "fillem", and that sounds very much like a Dutch boys first name "Willem". But just because they may sound very similar, there is no etymological relationship between them at all.

If I would have lived ages ago, I might have pronounced "valkant" as "vallekant" or "fallekant".

Then the French came here - you know, Napoleon and his merry men saving mankind from their oppressors and all that bull - and the French language became the posh language of those who considered themselves 'civilized' and educated.

And it's not that ridiculous to think that a word like 'valkant' - pronounced like 'fallekant' - suddenly changed into 'faliekant' because someone thought that would look real cool (and French).

.

Edited by Abramelin

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"And now for something completely different" (yes, I really loved those Monty Python shows, lol).

I have said that that word, "WAK", that showed up in the OLB and on the Over de Linden coat of arms as made by Cornelis Over de Linden himself, intrigued me.

I was quite certain it was a word in one of Nostradamus' "Centuries" or maybe in one of Mother Shipton's prophecies, but I DID remember it had to do with the sound some bird made.

You won't have any idea how long I searched and searched, and in the meantime ignoring what was constantly wandering around in my mind.... Indonesia/Philippines.

Well, after I recently found out the Over de Linden family had connections with Indonesia, this is what I got:

Kandar kasisi. Naam van een onheil aanbrengenden vogel, manoek pangalitan. Wordt ook naar het geluid, dat hij maakt, wak wak wik wik genoemd.

(about an ominous bird called Wak Wak Wik Wik)

Author: Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Netherlands ), Institut voor taal -, land- en volkenkunde van Nederlandsch Indië , The Hague

Publisher: M. Nijhoff

Year: 1890

Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHT

Language: Dutch

http://www.archive.org/stream/bijdragentotdet41hagugoog#page/n13/mode/2up

The Wakwak is a vampiric, bird-like creature in Philippine mythology or said to be a witch. It is said to snatch humans at night as prey, similar to the Manananggal and the Ekek in rural areas of the Philippines, due to its ability to fly. The difference between the Mananggal and the Wakwak is that Wakwak cannot separate its torso from its body while the Manananggal can. Some believe it is also a form a vampire takes. Other people contend that a "Wakwak" is a Philippine night bird belonging to a witch.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wakwak

Having had girlfriends from the Philippines and Indonesia appears to be an advantage of some sorts, but I never expected it to be an advantage when discussing some old manuscript, LOL.

+++

EDIT:

I will never forget that night in July, 2007.

My Phillipine girlfriend was with me, and we were trying to find out if the Kama Sutra was as good as it was purported to be, heh.

Then some crow cawed, and she froze... "Wak Wak!!" she whispered. I asked what the hell was the matter, but she had turned quite pale and the fun was over, lol.

She didn't know our Dutch crows have adapted to artificial/electric light, and happily fly around late at night.

When I told her next morning that I love crows and any corvid, she looked at me as though I had gone mad.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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"Caw Caw" or "Wak Wak" (Malaysian)........

Here is part of the first page of Overwijn's book about the OLB:

Overwijjn_OLB_firstpage.jpg

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Mr. M. de Haan Hettema (author of 1832 Oldfrisian dictionary) in Leeuwarder Courant (5 sept. 1871) about the OLB:

"It was written in the Frisian language; I don't know a distinction between Oldfrisian and Land- or Farmers-Frisian. I only know another and newer spelling of that language, because the pronounciation of Frisian is virtually the same as some ages ago, which was demonstrated by the worldfamous linguist the Danish prof. R. Rask in his Frisian grammar [...]

Concerning the spelling in this text, this in my opinion is much more in accordance with the older and very regular, and much better and regular than of those, who nowadays write that language; it would be desirable, that one would adapt that spelling, so there would be more unity of spelling, and the origin of the language would, better than now, be conserved. People nowadays write it with Dutch sounds, and in contemporary Dutch writing style. But this is no surprise. None of the later writers in that language, including Gijsbert Japiks and the Halbertsma brothers, have taken the spelling of the old manuscripts into account. Only T.R. Dijkstra and H.S. Sytstra tried to follow the tracks of the old and kept seeing the value of that spelling."

(improvised translation by me)

Edited by Otharus

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Mr. M. de Haan Hettema (author of 1832 Oldfrisian dictionary) in Leeuwarder Courant (5 sept. 1871) about the OLB:

"It was written in the Frisian language; I don't know a distinction between Oldfrisian and Land- or Farmers-Frisian. I only know another and newer spelling of that language, because the pronounciation of Frisian is virtually the same as some ages ago, which was demonstrated by the worldfamous linguist the Danish prof. R. Rask in his Frisian grammar [...]

Concerning the spelling in this text, this in my opinion is much more in accordance with the older and very regular, and much better and regular than of those, who nowadays write that language; it would be desirable, that one would adapt that spelling, so there would be more unity of spelling, and the origin of the language would, better than now, be conserved. People nowadays write it with Dutch sounds, and in contemporary Dutch writing style. But this is no surprise. None of the later writers in that language, including Gijsbert Japiks and the Halbertsma brothers, have taken the spelling of the old manuscripts into account. Only T.R. Dijkstra and H.S. Sytstra tried to follow the tracks of the old and kept seeing the value of that spelling."

(improvised translation by me)

Gijsbert Japiks a later writer??

He died 2 centuries or so before the OLB was published, lol.

++++

No, I am sure: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gysbert_Japiks

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Gijsbert Japiks a later writer??

He died 2 centuries or so before the OLB was published, lol.

He will have ment later than the time of the known Oldfrisian manuscripts.

The Halbertsma bros. also died before OLB's publication.

Edited by Otharus

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He will have ment later than the time of the known Oldfrisian texts.

The Halbertsma bros. also died before OLB's publication.

OK, I was too rash with my respons.

But how is a Hettema able to know who pronounced Old Frisian best?

Did he have a time machine and a tape recorder?

Or because some Dane thought so?

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Thach nêi min ynfalda myning skolde thât falikant utkvmma.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

My translation in old Dutch-ish:

Doch na(ar) mijn eenvuldige (http://www.etymologi...woord/eenvoudig) mening zoude dat scheef uitkomen.

Sandbach:

According to my humble opinion, they would have made a great mistake.

My translation into English:

Though, to my humble opinion, it would turn out skewed.

Faliekant = crooked, not straight/ skewed, sloping / wrong

Faliekant is generally seen as a medieval combination of the French "faille" = false and the Dutch "kant" is side'.

Another way to explain this word is by using an old, 13th century form: 'valkant', literally "drop side".

De Bo, 1236: valkant schuins (Schuerm. Bijv. 352).

http://www.etymologi...woord/faliekant

Btw, the Old Ducth word "falie" has nothing to do with this word:

http://www.etymologi...trefwoord/falie (falie = cloak)

I have considered the OLB word "falikant" as an anachronism in the OLB, but I think I was wrong.

This is my explanation of why I think I was.

"Valkant" could have been an ancient carpenter's word.

tri_hypotenuse.gif

It's the hypothenuse.

=

Compare this word with "film". I - any many here with me - pronounce that word as "fillem", and that sounds very much like a Dutch boys first name "Willem". But just because they may sound very similar, there is no etymological relationship between them at all.

If I would have lived ages ago, I might have pronounced "valkant" as "vallekant" or "fallekant".

Then the French came here - you know, Napoleon and his merry men saving mankind from their oppressors and all that bull - and the French language became the posh language of those who considered themselves 'civilized' and educated.

And it's not that ridiculous to think that a word like 'valkant' - pronounced like 'fallekant' - suddenly changed into 'faliekant' because someone thought that would look real cool (and French).

.

falikant is an Oldfrisian word = verkeerd-wrong, false. The etymology deals with sewing wood, but there is also another explanation falie = Lat. velum (zeil) which gives an etymology with making sails for ships (which have a similar triangular shape).

Edited by Knul

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It appears to be a coat of arms.

Anyone?

++++++

EDIT:

Found it:

OverdeLinden_familiewapen.jpg

OverdeLinden_familiewapen2.jpg

Over de Linden had made the coat of arms himself (from old coins), and it showed 3 lime trees near a watering hole. At the bottom it says "WAK" in OLB script.

http://argyf.fryske-...eiding_9-54.pdf

.

The word Wak ! (in OLB script) has been added later on an existing sign (probably from the family Bosgra). It may be part of the hoax to illustrate the old origin of Over de Linden.

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But how is a Hettema able to know who pronounced Old Frisian best?

Yes, I would be skeptical about that part too.

But the rest is relevant, and he could know what he was talking about.

He made an Oldfrisian dictionary and studied the grammar...

"It was written in the Frisian language; I don't know a distinction between Oldfrisian and Land- or Farmers-Frisian. [...]

Concerning the spelling in this text, this in my opinion is much more in accordance with the older and very regular, and much better and regular than of those, who nowadays write that language; it would be desirable, that one would adapt that spelling, so there would be more unity of spelling, and the origin of the language would, better than now, be conserved. People nowadays write it with Dutch sounds, and in contemporary Dutch writing style. But this is no surprise. None of the later writers in that language, including Gijsbert Japiks and the Halbertsma brothers, have taken the spelling of the old manuscripts into account."

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Leendert Floris Over de Linden (1837-1919) was a son of Cornelis (1811-1874).

In 1877 he published his answer to Beckering Vinckers with the title "Beweerd maar niet Bewezen" (claimed but not proven).

Here's a translation of what he wrote about his father's relationship with bookbinder Stadermann, one of the 'suspects' in some of the hoax-theories.

"Concerning the frienship between my father and mister Stadermann, I record that this was not more than relation of friendly neighbors, at most during one year, in 1847. After that my father moved house and the relation ended entirely."

Original text:

"Betrekkelijk de vriendschap tusschen mijn vader en den Heer Stadermann teeken ik aan, dat die zich bepaald heeft tot den omgang als welwillende buren, hoogstens één jaar lang, in 1847. Na dien tijd is mijn vader verhuisd en hield de omgang geheel op."

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... it was this same Ottema who had noticed that the numerals as introduced by the OLB Godfreyath the Witking were very similar to what he saw in a Dutch library (The Royal Library/"De Koninklijke Bibliotheek" in The Hague), ie. on a copy of a plate from the Alhambra (Granada).

L.F. Over de Linden ("Beweerd maar niet bewezen", 1877) also refers to this:

"The most important peculiarity, concerning the origin of our numbers - called 'Arabic', but never used by the Arabs - the peculiarity that these numbers, in the 'Yul' as in the manuscript, appear as ornamentfigures in the decorations of the Alhambra, the greatest memorial of Morish architecture in Spain..."

Can anyone provide pictures of these decorations?

Edited by Otharus

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falikant is an Oldfrisian word = verkeerd-wrong, false. The etymology deals with sewing wood, but there is also another explanation falie = Lat. velum (zeil) which gives an etymology with making sails for ships (which have a similar triangular shape).

You should read this explanation: http://www.wnt.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article_content&wdb=WNT&id=M073213

The word may come from West Flemish and does indeed have to do with wood carving.

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