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Riaan

[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood

11,638 posts in this topic

More basically (long before there were 'katerns' or 'letters'), 32 is 2 to the 5th exponent (2x2x2x2x2), the number of ancestors in the 5th generation (grandparents of great-grandparents).

The number 32 is also equal to 1 + 2² + 3³ (and that should be 1 to the power of 1).

And then there are those 2 letters, -W- and -GS- , that are left out of the Yule wheel table on page 46 of the manuscript. The letter letter -W- shows up very frequently, the letter -GS- only in the OLB word "segs".

If it really is somekind of 'message' or code, what can we do with or make from -W- and -GS- ?

WGS / WSG / GSW / GWS / SWG / SGW ?? W = VV = UU?? >> GWS=GUUS? No idea at all.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Allow me a little nitpick.

To avoid confusion, I would suggest to use "West-Friesland" for the western part of Friesland, and "Westfriesland" for the region in North-Holland.

BTW, I have noticed that on Frisian radio, they usually refer to Westfriesland as "de kop van Noord-Holland".

Ice-skaters from typical Westfrisian villages are never called Westfrisians, probably because they would find it confusing, but the result is, that many Frisians don't even know that "Westfriesland" exists.

I often use west/south/north/east without a capital. And that's for the non-Dutch here. So it would be west Friesland when I mean the western part of the province of Friesland. I know the new (?) spelling of for instance Noordholland is now Noord-Holland, but that will only confuse those who are not Dutch (as you know, many foreign people say "Holland" instead of "the Netherlands"; you may have noticed I always use "the Netherlands").

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32 is 2 to the 5th exponent (2x2x2x2x2), the number of ancestors in the 5th generation (grandparents of great-grandparents).

Or, if every parent would bring forth 1 daughter and 1 son, starting with one pair:

2 exp 0 = 1

A

2 exp 1 = 2

O1 x F1

2 exp 2 = 4

O2a x F2b

O2b x F2a

2 exp 3 = 8

O3aa x F3bb

O3ab x F3ba

O3ba x F3ab

O3bb x F3aa

2 exp 4 = 16

O4aaa x F4bbb

O4aab x F4bba

O4aba x F4bab

O4abb x F4baa

O4baa x F4abb

O4bab x F4aba

O4bba x F4aab

O4bbb x F4aaa

2 exp 5 = 32

O5aaaa x F5bbbb

O5aaab x F5bbba

O5aaba x F5bbab

O5aabb x F5bbaa

O5abaa x F5babb

O5abab x F5baba

O5abba x F5baab

O5abbb x F5baaa

O5baaa x F5abbb

O5baab x F5abba

O5baba x F5abab

O5babb x F5abaa

O5bbaa x F5aabb

O5bbab x F5aaba

O5bbba x F5aaab

O5bbbb x F5aaaa

Edited by Otharus

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Welcome back, Puzzler.

I understand that is an Ozzy expression, meaning receive criticism.

Funny, I had never heard that one.

Made me check it out some more:

cop from copper (policeman), who who captures - he who cops (captures) - a copper is a term for policeman here

flak

1938, from Ger. Flak, condensed from Fliegerabwehrkanone, lit. "pilot warding-off cannon." Sense of "anti-aircraft fire" is 1940; metaphoric sense of "criticism" is c.1963 in Amer.Eng.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=flak

capture the cannon fire - lol

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I have been very busy with ancient North-Frisian legends I found a 19th century online account of. It was copied with OCR (Optical Character Reading) and thus contained a multitude of errors.

The legend (or the interpretation thereof) talks about what can only be Three Goddesses (but no names), a supreme spirit called The Old One, or "Uald", and some 'lost race'.

I will be busy for some time to make it more readable (with alineas). Don't get overly excited now, it really reads like a fairy tale, but nevertheless, worth the trouble of reading in relation to the OLB. I will post it in my OLB blog because it's a lot of text I don't think will I be able to post here in one post.

++++++

EDIT:

Well, I won't let anyone wait unnecessarily long, so here it is:

http://oeralinda.blogspot.com/2012/02/old-legends-from-isle-of-sylt.html

Still needs a bit of cleaning up, but it will do for now.

Many hundred years later, says

our Frisian story-teller, one would

find in most Frisian houses and on

the ships representations of the

same virtues justice as a woman,

with sword and balances; unity or

love, a woman with three babes,

one nestling in. her bosom; hope,

with one hand on her anchor and

with the other holding a bird.

These were carved on walls and

cupboards, or worked in metal.

(The predecessors of Frya, Lyda, and Finda?)

==

It is difficult to know what to

make of this strange tale. I am

inclined to think it is made up of

two or three stories of very vary-

ing dates. The oldest part prob-

ably relates to the arrival of the

Frisians from over the sea, led by

their god, who in later times was,

by euphemistic process, turned

sometimes into Uald, the Old or

Elder one, sometimes into Freso:

(Uald the Old One => Wr-Alda the Over Old One?_

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Damn, this is kind of eerie: I have been reading about Friso of the Frisian legends till my eyes popped out, and just now I learn (tv) that the son of the Dutch Queen, Prins Friso, nearly got killed in an avalanche yesterday while skiing.

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On your site I read:

"[p. 1] ADELA."

This page does not exist.

And:

"Moet zijn: TO HAPE HROPA"

I have shown you that WOPA is good Oldfrisian and fits perfectly here.

And:

"29 - ON HJA FRUCHDA ÆND NOCHTA ANDA DRAMA WR-

30 ALDAS . OD"

Conclusion: your 'corrected' transliteration is worthless.

I will not use it.

Man, when are you finally going to do your homework?

Jensma's version (2006) contains a corrected transliteration (better than yours!) with numbered lines.

You are right, but the difference is that I have taken the fixed 32 lines per page as basic. In my opinion it has been the initial goal of Cornelis over de Linden and Ernest Stadermann to have the manuscript printed (along with a translation). They must have taken one of the first printed books (incunabulae) as an example. Else I can not explain the non linguistic cutting of words in the middle of nowhere. I have said earlier, that tne OLB pages mirror a concept for the lead-setter at a printery. If it would have been an original manuscript, it would have been composed with much more attention, now it looks like a draft. As far as I know Jensma has not seen the manuscript as a draft for the lead-setter, but he describes the work as hastily executed.

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(Uald the Old One => Wr-Alda the Over Old One?)

Of course I should have added that:

1) "the Old One" is NOT a translation of "Uald"; like I already posted in my post abour "Reintja" (Reinout/Regnis-wald)etc):

Uald is of Germanic origin. The name Uald means 'a brave ruler'. Forms of Uald include the names Ualda, Ualdaa, Ualdae, Ualdah, Ualdai, and Ualdia.

http://www.babynamespedia.com/meaning/Uald

2) Wr-alda, however, could be translated as "over old" or "very old", and so on.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Sylt is an interesting island with an interesting history...

I posted about Sylt on my OLB blog, but here's more:

*Sylt was originally part of Jutland (today Denmark and Schleswig-Holstein)

*There is evidence of human habitation going back to 3000 BC at Denghoog

*First settlements of Frisians during the 8th century and 9th century

*Sylt was divided between the Duke of Schleswig and the Kingdom of Denmark in 1386

*Except for the town of List, Sylt became part of the Duchy of Schleswig in 1435

*During the 17th century and 18th century, whaling, fishing and oyster breeding increased the wealth of the population

*Keitum became the capital of the island, and a place for rich captains to settle down

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylt

Denghoog is an ancient monument dating from 3000 BC near Wenningstedt-Braderup on the German Island of Sylt.

Mr. W.G. Black speaks of it thus:—

"There is some confusion as to King Finn's dwelling. As doctors differ, we may be allowed to claim that it was the Denghoog, close to Wenningstedt, if only because we descended into that remarkable dwelling. Externally merely a swelling green mound, like so many others in Sylt, entrance is gained by a trap-door in the roof, and descending a steep ladder, one finds himself in a subterranean chamber, some seventeen by ten feet in size [5.2 × 3.0 m], the walls of which are twelve huge blocks of Swedish granite;[Pg 72] the height of the roof varies from five feet to six feet [1.5–1.8 m]. The original entrance appears to have been a long narrow passage, seventeen feet [5.2 m] long and about two feet wide and high. This mound was examined by a Hamburg professor in 1868, who found remains of a fireplace, bones of a small man, some clay urns, and stone weapons. Later, a Kiel professor is said to have carried off all he found therein to Kiel Museum, and so far we have not been able to trace the published accounts of his investigations."[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denghoog

I remember I once jokingly said that if Alewyn was right about the Faroer Islands possibly being the remnants of Aldland, then the "Finda", the original and only (and Mongolian/Asian looking) people on Aldland, can only have been the Inuit (or Eskimos as they were once called).

Heh, read this:

Fians, Fairies and Picts, by David MacRitchie

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17926/17926-h/17926-h.htm

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17926/17926-h/images/20large.jpg

Professor Henri van Elven, the main theme of whose forthcoming work, Les Nains préhistoriques de l'Europe Occidentale, formed the subject of a paper recently read by him before the Société d'Archéologie de Bruxelles; and MM. Grandgagnage and De Reul, cited by Mr. C. Carter Blake, F.G.S., in connection with the Nutons of the Belgian bone-caves;[16] as also another writer of the Low Countries, Van den Bergh ("xxx. and 313"), whom Mr. J. Dirks quotes at p. 15 of his Heidens of Egyptiërs, Utrecht, 1850.

In Mr. W.G. Black's charming book on Heligoland,[17] one passage (p. 72) recognises that a certain Sylt tradition "is evidently one of those valuable legends which illuminate dark pages of history. It clearly bears[Pg xxii] testimony to the same small race having inhabited Friesland in times which we trace in the caves of the Neolithic age, and of which the Esquimaux are the only survivors." For many of the kindred traditions in that locality, one cannot do better than refer to Mr. Christian Jensen's Zwergsagen aus Nordfriesland, contributed to the Zeitschrift des Vereins für Volkskunde (Berlin, Heft 4, 1892).

==

A dwarf king named Fin is also remembered in[Pg 34] Frisian tradition;[38] and that he and his race were small men is pretty clearly proved by the fact that when one of the earth-houses attributed to him was opened some years ago, it was found to contain the bones of a little man.[39] Both of these dwarf Fins, Little Fin of Norway and Little Fin of Denmark, are undoubtedly real; and there seems no good reason to suppose that the dwarf Fin of Hebridean tradition was not equally real. Whether they were three separate people is a problem. "Fin" appears to have been at one time a not uncommon name, whatever its etymology and that of "Fian" may be. At any rate, there is nothing in history (which speaks of a close intercourse between Scandinavia and the British Isles, in former times), and nothing[Pg 35] in the ethnology of North-Western Europe, to make us regard as mythical the capture and enthralment of any one of these three "little Fins." If Fin of the Fians, therefore, was a typical Fian, they were little people.[40]

Dang: Finda =? Fian = Fin = .... Inuit??

:P

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"Fin" appears to have been at one time a not uncommon name, whatever its etymology and that of "Fian" may be.

[...]

If Fin of the Fians, therefore, was a typical Fian, they were little people.

Interesting.

Fian = vijand (enemy)

Oudnederlands Woordenboek (sorry, too lazy to translate today):

fīunt

Woordsoort: znw., m.

Modern lemma: VIJAND

Oudste attestatie: 901-1000

Frequentie: totaal: 26, appellatieven: 26

Etymologie: Cognaten: Oudfries fiānd, fiūnd.

Morfologie: ongeleed. Oorspronkelijk het tegenwoordig deelwoord van het ww. dat overeenkomt met Ohd. fīēn, Got. fijan 'haten', dat in het Ndl. niet meer bekend is.

http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article&wdb=ONW&id=ID3660&lemmodern=vijand

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Menapii -> Me-Na-By -> Mee Nabij -> onze buren die met ons zijn -> Allied Neighbours (Doornik region)

Chauci -> Ga-Houck -> Hoekig gaan, binnenvallen -> Tsjokken (to shock, see Choques in Frans Vlaanderen) -> to be shocked

And to make the movie complete we have

Germani -> Geer-mannen -> Samenkomen (vergaren, vergaderen, guerre)

Alemani -> Hale-mannen -> Allemant is a village in Frans Vlaanderen

Gaulen -> Ga-Halen -> We gaan het halen, wat ze ons hebben afgepakt!

Thank you VG, good to see you're busy with some older pages of the thread.

OLB provides an etymology for GERMANI and ALEMANI, I wonder if CHAUCI can be related to this fragment:

"MEN KAVCH IS ÁK WAN FRYAS ÀND MOT KÁP WÉSA" (p.146).

Gaules are called GOLA in OLB, but the meaning is not clear.

It is suggested that was the name of the sent priests from Sion. (p.60).

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I cried my eyes out because I thought she would never come back...and drown at sea!! And that I can remember very clearly.

The first dream about me dying was also about drowning. I was 11, had never thought about how it would be, but it was very realistic. I was deep down, trying to reach the surface, when I ran out of air and could no longer hold my breath. When my lungs filled with kold, salt water, I sank down, and that surprised me, because I had never realised by then that that is what would actually happen.

The oldest dream (when I was 4 or 5) was really bizarre. I was a grown up man, lying in bed with princess (now queen) B.

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And then there are those 2 letters, -W- and -GS- , that are left out of the Yule wheel table on page 46 of the manuscript.

Although usually written as if it is one letter, I think W was officially seen as double V. COdL also explains this in one of his diaries (things he had learnt from his father, appearantly), and in English the letter is also called double-U.

Why GS (or Gz) is missing, I don't know. Maybe the letter was 'modern' and not official.

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I have been very busy with ancient North-Frisian legends I found a 19th century online account of. It was copied with OCR (Optical Character Reading) and thus contained a multitude of errors.

The legend (or the interpretation thereof) talks about what can only be Three Goddesses (but no names), a supreme spirit called The Old One, or "Uald", and some 'lost race'.

This surely sounds interesting, but what is said about the source of this info?

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Interesting.

Fian = vijand (enemy)

Oudnederlands Woordenboek (sorry, too lazy to translate today):

fīunt

Woordsoort: znw., m.

Modern lemma: VIJAND

Oudste attestatie: 901-1000

Frequentie: totaal: 26, appellatieven: 26

Etymologie: Cognaten: Oudfries fiānd, fiūnd.

Morfologie: ongeleed. Oorspronkelijk het tegenwoordig deelwoord van het ww. dat overeenkomt met Ohd. fīēn, Got. fijan 'haten', dat in het Ndl. niet meer bekend is.

http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article&wdb=ONW&id=ID3660&lemmodern=vijand

Otharus, I have lot more to tell you all about these "Fin", but I better wait till next day, heh.

I do not want to post something that makes me look like a dork again.

Well, if you don't want to wait, Google "Paabo" AND "Boat-people" AND "Inuit", all that together in one Google search.

Swede once said the guy who created that 'Paabo' website was 'just' an artist, but I can tell you here and now: the Paabo guy (a Finn) may not be a scientist, but sure as hell he is not stupid.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Gaules are called GOLA in OLB, but the meaning is not clear.

It is suggested that was the name of the sent priests from Sion. (p.60).

GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)

In Jewish folklore, a golem (ɡoʊləm/ goh-ləm; Hebrew: גולם‎) is an animated anthropomorphic being, created entirely from inanimate matter. The word was used to mean an amorphous, unformed material in Psalms and medieval writing.

[...]

The word golem occurs once in the Bible in Psalm 139:16, which uses the word גלמי, meaning "my unshaped form".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golem

220px-Golem_by_Philippe_Semeria.jpg

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GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)

In Jewish folklore, a golem (ɡoʊləm/ goh-ləm; Hebrew: גולם‎) is an animated anthropomorphic being, created entirely from inanimate matter. The word was used to mean an amorphous, unformed material in Psalms and medieval writing.

[...]

The word golem occurs once in the Bible in Psalm 139:16, which uses the word גלמי, meaning "my unshaped form".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golem

220px-Golem_by_Philippe_Semeria.jpg

Gola in Hebrew refers to the Jewish diaspora

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gola

The Jewish diaspora (or simply the Diaspora) is the English term used to describe the Galut גלות (Yiddish: 'Golus'), or 'exile', of the Jews from the region of the Kingdom of Judah and Roman Iudaea and later emigration from wider Eretz Israel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_diaspora

====

Calais << Kales << Caled/Calad << Caletum

Although the early history of habitation in the area is obscure, the Romans called the settlement Caletum. Julius Caesar mustered 800 to 1000 sailing boats and 5 legions and some 2000 horses at Calais due to its strategic position to attack Britannia.[1] Later, in medieval times, the settlement was inhabited by people who spoke Dutch, and who called it Kales. It is mentioned in Welsh documents as Caled, in Irish documents as Calad, and in Breton documents as Kaled. It is at the western edge of the early medieval estuary of the River Aa.

Kalta? Celts?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calais

I think this etymology is why Iman Wilkens said the Pillars of Hercules were the white cliffs of the Street of Dover. Her-Cules.

>> It is possible that the name Herne may originate from the Old English hyrne, the O.E. for 'horn' or 'corner' [13][14][15] At any rate it is clearly derived from the same Indo-European root, *ker-n-, meaning bone or horn.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herne_the_Hunter

"Horn/Corner of Kales"? Hern-Kales? LOL.

+++++++++++++

EDIT:

The reader of the writing was

Freso, and he the wanderers chose

to be their king, or visible Uald.

But their troubles were by no

means at an end, and they had

many adventures before passing

through the Pillars of Hercules,

which the Frisians call "dit Nau."

Then they entered the Atlantic,

which they call "the Spanish sea."

http://oeralinda.blogspot.com/2012/02/old-legends-from-isle-of-sylt.html

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Interesting.

Fian = vijand (enemy)

Oudnederlands Woordenboek (sorry, too lazy to translate today):

fīunt

Woordsoort: znw., m.

Modern lemma: VIJAND

Oudste attestatie: 901-1000

Frequentie: totaal: 26, appellatieven: 26

Etymologie: Cognaten: Oudfries fiānd, fiūnd.

Morfologie: ongeleed. Oorspronkelijk het tegenwoordig deelwoord van het ww. dat overeenkomt met Ohd. fīēn, Got. fijan 'haten', dat in het Ndl. niet meer bekend is.

http://gtb.inl.nl/iWDB/search?actie=article&wdb=ONW&id=ID3660&lemmodern=vijand

fiend

O.E. feond "enemy, foe," originally prp. of feogan "to hate," from P.Gmc. *fijæjan (cf. O.Fris. fiand "enemy," O.S. fiond, M.D. viant, Du. vijand "enemy," O.N. fjandi, O.H.G. fiant, Goth. fijands), from PIE base *pe(i)- "to blame, revile" (cf. Goth. faian "to blame;" see passion). As spelling suggests, it was originally the opposite of friend, but the word began to be used in O.E. for "Satan" (as the "enemy of mankind"), which shifted its sense to "diabolical person" (early 13c.). The old sense of the word devolved to foe, then to the imported word enemy.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=fiend&searchmode=none

vijand zn. ‘tegenstander’ (opponent)

Onl. fīunt, fīant ‘tegenstander’ in uuanda of fiunt flukit mi ‘want als de vijand mij vervloekte’ [10e eeuw; W.Ps.], ande sint auor thine uiande ‘het zijn echter je vijanden’ [ca. 1100; Will.]; mnl. viant ‘tegenstander; (de) duivel’ in hare uiande ‘hun tegenstanders’ [1236; VMNW]; vnnl. vijand, vyand.

Het al vroeg in alle Germaanse talen zelfstandig gebruikte teg.deelw. van Proto-Germaans *fijēn- ‘haten’.(=to hate)

Os. fiand, fiond (mnd. viant); ohd. fīant (nhd. Feind); ofri. fiand, fiund (nfri. fijân < nl.); oe. fēond (ne. fiend); on. fjándi (nzw. fiende); got. fijands; alle (oorspr.) ‘tegenstander, vijand’, ook wel ‘(de) duivel’; < pgm. *fijēnd-, letterlijk ‘de hatende’, bij het werkwoord *fijēn- ‘haten’, waaruit: ohd. fīēn; oe. fēōn; on. fjá; got. fijan.

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/vijand

Well, maybe "Fian" was the name of some people who became the enemies of later invaders?

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GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)

Dutch Wiki (translated):

"Golem (Jewish legend)" was an anthropomorphic figure made of clay and animated by a rabbi [priest].

The word golem is probably derived from the Hebrew word 'gelem'(גלם), which means raw material.

200px-Golem_and_Loew.jpg

OLB, translation Sandbach p.139:

"Among Finda's people there are false teachers, who, by their over-inventiveness, have become so wicked that they make themselves and their adherents believe that they are the best part of Wr-alda, that their spirit is the best part of Wr-alda's spirit, and that Wr-alda can only think by the help of their brains.

That every creature is a part of Wr-alda's eternal being, that they have stolen from us; but their false reasoning and ungovernable pride have brought them on the road to ruin. If their spirit was Wr-alda's spirit, then Wr-alda would be very stupid, instead of being sensible and wise; for their spirit labours to create beautiful statues, which they afterwards worship."

Edited by Otharus

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The word "GOLA" dates from about the 6th century BC, while "GOLEM" is from medieval times, but anyway, centuries more recent then GOLA.

You should also not forget that the Hebrews and Phoenicians spoke closely related languages, and that very often Hebrews travelled along with the Phoenicians to settle along the coasts of the Mediterranean.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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The word "GOLA" dates from about the 6th century BC, while "GOLEM" is from medieval times, but anyway, centuries more recent then GOLA.

The oldest sources for the word "golem" may be from medieval times, but the folklore may have been much older.

Anyway, a relationship with "GOLA" (as used in OLB) makes sense.

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The oldest sources for the word "golem" may be from medieval times, but the folklore may have been much older.

Anyway, a relationship with "GOLA" (as used in OLB) makes sense.

I think you make it difficult for yourself.

Tha Gola, alsa heton tha saendalinga prestera Sydon-is.

De Gola, alzo heten de zendeling priesters of Sydon.

The Gola, as the missionary priests of Sydon were called.

You do not need "GOLEM", the word "GOLA" could be a Hebrew/Phoenician word for people who spread out from their homeland (Lebanon/Judea).

Even the date the Greeks first settled in what was later to become Marseilles fits the word "GOLA": the Hebrews also travelled along with Greek merchants, and the date the Greeks settled in Marseilles is more or less the date the Hebrews started using the word "GOLA".

.

Edited by Abramelin

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GOLA, Zion priests (OLB) <?=?> Golem (Jewish folklore)

correction:

Sídon priests

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Gaules are called GOLA in OLB, but the meaning is not clear.

It is suggested that was the name of the sent priests from Sion. (p.60).

Some thoughts on the Gola from Sidon in Phoenicia:

OLB: The book of Adelas followers (Chapter 25):

The Gola, as the missionary priests from Sidon were called, had noticed that the land there (Southern France) was sparsely populated and far from the Mother. In order to make themselves look good, they had themselves called in our language truth devotees (trowe widena); but they had better have been called truth avoiders (trowe wendena) or in short, Triuwenden, as our seafaring people afterwards called them.

Survivors of the Great Tsunami (Second Edition), Chapter 3, page 127:

The "Gola" called themselves "Trowe Widena" or "Treow-Wits" (Adherents or knowers of the Truth). The Frisians did not trust them at all and nicknamed them "Trowe Wendena" (truth avoiders) or "Truiwenden" in short.

The pagan religions from the East now had the Fryan Federation in a pincher with the Magy and his Magyarar priests in the north and north-east and the Treowit priests with their Gola missionaries in the south and west. The "Gola" later become known as the "Gauls" and the name "Treowits" evolved into "Druids" the mysterious leaders in ancient Gaul that destroyed Fryan monotheism and held sway over the people in Gallic religion.

(Druids: From Treow+Wit, literally meaning Knower of the truth.

See: Treow (Old English, Anglo Saxon), Triuwi (Old Frisian) = Truth, and

Wit (Old English and Old Frisian) = Knowledge, understanding)

The Golan Heights, bordered by present-day Israel, Syria, Lebanon and Jordan, sounds suspiciously as though it may have been the origin of the ancient Gola priests (the Gola from Golan?) in nearby Sydon. "Golan" means "Captive" in Hebrew. The refuge town Golan is mentioned in the Bible in Deuteronomy 4:41-43 (RSV). If this supposition is correct, it would mean that the ancient Gauls had ties with the Golan Heights, which was annexed by Israel in 1981.

Edited by Alewyn

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I think you make it difficult for yourself.

I like difficult, that's why I chose to study the OLB.

This idea, that started this morning, will lead to a breakthrough.

Give me some time to make my point.

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