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Riaan

[Archived]Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood

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Who knows the meaning of ULK ?

Check any Oldfrisian dictionary.

VLKE, ULKE = wolk (dutch), wolke (german), cloud (english)

And ofcourse it does make sense; the priests were creating a supernatural myth about her.

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generation 14

15 364. Willem van Oranje, stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland and Utrecht *Dillenburg 24.04.1533 +Delft 10.07.1584

15 365. Louise de Coligny *Châtillon-sur-Loing 23.09.1555 +Fontainebleau 13.11.1620

The Dutch national anthem refers to this Willem.

It starts with:

"Wilhelmus van Nassouwe

ben ik, van Duitsen bloed,

den Vaderland getrouwe

blijf ik tot in den dood."

translated:

"William of Nassau

I am, of German blood,

loyal to the fatherland

I remain till death."

The royals descend at least twice from him.

After I posted the long list, I found:

03 849. Sophia Dorothea van de Palts *Den Haag 14.10.1630 +Herrenhausen 08.06.1714

= = = = = =

07 698. Frederik van de Palts *Oberpfalz 26.08.1596 +Mainz 29.11.1632

07 699. Elizabeth Stuart *Fifeshire Schotland 19.08.1596 +Londen 13.02.1662

= = = = = =

15 396. Frederik van de Palts *Amberg 05.03.1574 +Heidelberg 19.09.1610

15 397. Louise Juliana van Nassau *Delft 31.03.1576 +Königsberg 15.03.1644

= = = = = =

30 794. = 15 364.

30 795. Charlotte de Bourbon *ca.1546 +Antwerpen 5.05.1582

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Well, if it's not that interesting then you better go read other threads, right?

There are more than enough threads about Atlantis and aliens intervening in ancient cultures and pyramids.

Maybe more to your liking?

yep your right, and fair go, i deserve a tounge lashing no doubt, though FYI, the only other threads i tend to read on UM recently would be about AE + the great pyramid (so you divined that right). Alien intervention and atlantis is a bit bellow the belt though, nevermind, believe it or not i would actually rather make friends here (i think?), so if your not feeling too superior perhaps you'll forgive the faux pas i've made on my very first comment in UM. like i say i'll take it on the chin; what i should have said perhaps was, on the contrary, there's actually TOO much of interest in this thread; stuff about antiquity, cultures, races, geological events even etymology (which up to now really did/does bore me), etc, etc. The fascinating thing being that its all been generated by a book that is surely a fabrication, but as a thread, it is practically idigestable unless you were following it from the begining,(it's not just the thread lengh, if you read the links too, it triples or quadruples in size). Anyway, at least I had a go, and may come back to it now and then, no hard feelings my man...ok, off to post on some dumb ass fringe thread thats more suited to my itellectual capacity - right.(ha ha, just kidding Abe.)

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Speak for yourself.

Now THAT was irrelevant information.

It was as relevant as your huge list. Why would the queen have called her son "Friso"?

Btw, I am not going to ask the admins to remove your list, lol.

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yep your right, and fair go, i deserve a tounge lashing no doubt, though FYI, the only other threads i tend to read on UM recently would be about AE + the great pyramid (so you divined that right). Alien intervention and atlantis is a bit bellow the belt though, nevermind, believe it or not i would actually rather make friends here (i think?), so if your not feeling too superior perhaps you'll forgive the faux pas i've made on my very first comment in UM. like i say i'll take it on the chin; what i should have said perhaps was, on the contrary, there's actually TOO much of interest in this thread; stuff about antiquity, cultures, races, geological events even etymology (which up to now really did/does bore me), etc, etc. The fascinating thing being that its all been generated by a book that is surely a fabrication, but as a thread, it is practically idigestable unless you were following it from the begining,(it's not just the thread lengh, if you read the links too, it triples or quadruples in size). Anyway, at least I had a go, and may come back to it now and then, no hard feelings my man...ok, off to post on some dumb ass fringe thread thats more suited to my itellectual capacity - right.(ha ha, just kidding Abe.)

My post to you wasn't even meant to sound "superior" or anything, I was just amazed your first post in this thread was nothing but "it's not interesting". I could wander around on this site and add that comment to about a 100 topics, lol.

And about reading all of it (or not): what I myself sometimes do is just go back a couple of 100 pages and re-read like 10 or 20 pages.

You are right: this thread covers many things, and again yes: the etymology is also not much of my thing. But I realize that it is necessary to discuss it; the OLB is supposed to be written in a really ancient language, but is it? I don't think it is.

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I have changed it.

It was too small anyway.

But in a way it was funny and relevant, I thought, because it shows a bit of Dutch folklore and playing with language and tradition.

OLB is seen by some as a hilarious, blasphemic parody too.

It was a performance in 1970 near Volendam (NH) by artist Jan Cremer (1940), titled:

"Hans Brinker saves Holland by putting his thumb in the Dyke"

hansbrinker.jpg

OK, well maybe I didn't get the joke. I'm not really into 'Benny Hill' humour. People could think it was you and it's really terribly crass, sorry.

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Who knows the meaning of ULK ?

MS 38, line 03 (P. 54):Thêr thrvch ne thuradon hja nên strid wither an to spinnande. Nv skolde aejder wâna, thaet hja vral-et folk to hâpe hropen hêde vmbe vs algadur to-t land ut to driwande. Nêan an stêde fon hja to bihluda gvngon hja allerwêikes, âk to tha hêinde Krêkalana til tha Alpa ut to kêthane, thaet et thene allervrste drochten hâgth hêde sin wisa toghater Min-erva, to nômth Nyhellênia êmong tha maenniska to sendane in overa sê mith-en ulk, vmbe tha manniska gode rêd to jêvane aend that allermannalik, thêr hja hêra wilde, rik aend lukich skolde wertha, aend ênis bâs skolde wertha ovir alle kêningkrik irtha.s. Hira byldnese staeldon hja vppe hjara aeltaerum, jeftha hja vrsellade-t anda dvma maenniska.

Ottema translates wolk (cloud), but it makes no sense.I think it was a horn or shell (h-ulk ?) to make one's voice louder as used on ships, so that commands are heard nevertheless the noise of wind and waves. An attribute of Minerva is a flute, which comes close. This flute (vuvuzela) is used by stockmen, shepherds. We meet the sheep in the story of Nyhellenia (= Minerva). The horn (toethoorn) is also used during the Maifest (pag. 130).

The problem with Ottema was, that he didn't know about marine terminology, so he asked Cornelis over de Linden to explain marine items.The Halbertsma's used to sail (skutjesilen) on the lakes between Grouw and Sneek.

Funny, I read your post and the answer is already in it.... it's a HULK:

hulk (n.)

O.E. hulc "light, fast ship" (but in M.E. a heavy, unwieldy one), probably from O.Du. hulke and M.L. hulcus, perhaps ultimately from Gk. holkas "merchant ship," lit. "ship that is towed," from helkein "to pull" (from PIE root *selk- "to pull, draw").

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=hulk&searchmode=none

Minerva wasn't sent on a 'cloud'. she was sent overseas with a hulk, a ship.

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Funny, I read your post and the answer is already in it.... it's a HULK:

hulk (n.)

O.E. hulc "light, fast ship" (but in M.E. a heavy, unwieldy one), probably from O.Du. hulke and M.L. hulcus, perhaps ultimately from Gk. holkas "merchant ship," lit. "ship that is towed," from helkein "to pull" (from PIE root *selk- "to pull, draw").

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

Minerva wasn't sent on a 'cloud'. she was sent overseas with a hulk, a ship.

Beautifil, Abe ! There is a Wikipedia article about the hulk with a nice picture. It is interesting, what they say about it''s function in the 19th century. http://nl.wikipedia....iki/Hulk_(schip)

Edited by Knul

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Beautifil, Abe ! There is a Wikipedia article about the hulk with a nice picture: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9b/Lebreton_engraving-09-hulk.jpg It is interesting, what they say about it's function in the 19th century. http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hulk_(schip)

Yeah, I thought this was a bit more of a realistic translation.

And the OLB uses 2 words for clouds: "wolka" & "wolkum".

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Check any Oldfrisian dictionary.

VLKE, ULKE = wolk (dutch), wolke (german), cloud (english)

And ofcourse it does make sense; the priests were creating a supernatural myth about her.

Unfortunately for you, Abe came with the relevant solution: hulk = type of ship.

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Yeah, I thought this was a bit more of a realistic translation.

And the OLB uses 2 words for clouds: "wolka" & "wolkum".

.

singular wolk plural wolka after prepositions or genitive pural wolkum.

like

singular svn plural svna after prepositions or genitive plural svnum

however

forms on -um are frequently mis-used as nominative plural.

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singular wolk plural wolka after prepositions or genitive pural wolkum.

like

singular svn plural svna after prepositions or genitive plural svnum

however

forms on -um are frequently mis-used as nominative plural.

Agreed.

And if a "hulk" indeed descended from the Greek "holkas" (or the other way round), then it might have looked like this replica:

KyreniaII_Ship_Sailing_In_Open_Sea_500_bg.jpg

http://kypros.org/Occupied_Cyprus/kyrenia/

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

http://www.specialtyinterests.net/eop7.html

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Agreed.

And if a "hulk" indeed descended from the Greek "holkas" (or the other way round), then it might have looked like this replica:

KyreniaII_Ship_Sailing_In_Open_Sea_500_bg.jpg

http://kypros.org/Occupied_Cyprus/kyrenia/

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

http://www.specialtyinterests.net/eop7.html

The OLB text was about Min-erva, aka Nyhellenia or better known as "Nehalennia".

Now look at how she is often being depicted:

220px-Nehalennia.jpg

She has her left foot on the prow of a ship, not on a cloud...

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Agreed.

And if a "hulk" indeed descended from the Greek "holkas" (or the other way round), then it might have looked like this replica:

KyreniaII_Ship_Sailing_In_Open_Sea_500_bg.jpg

http://kypros.org/Occupied_Cyprus/kyrenia/

4. An Example of Greco-Roman shipbuilding include a ship excavated off the northern coast of Cyprus in 1968/69 of the 4th century BC. This `Kyrenia' ship (Greek merchant vessel called: holkas) is now on display in the Museum of Kyrenia, Cyprus. See `The Adventure of Aeachaeology', Nat. Geogr. Book, p. 286-291.

http://www.specialtyinterests.net/eop7.html

Yep, picture seems a Holle Aak to me.

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Yep, picture seems a Holle Aak to me.

Sorry to disappoint you, but "aak" has an altogether different etymology.

The original word happens to be one that starts with an -N- (like "nako"):

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/aak1

And I know you will 'love' this:

Some people think that the name Nehalennia is derived from the Hebrew words ‘nahal’, meaning to guide and ‘aniah’ meaning ship. This would indicate the meaning to be ‘guide the ship’, i.e. he who guides the ship(s).

http://www.neeltjejans.nl/index.php/en/park-info/origin-of-the-name

:P

But if the name is indeed of Semitic origin, it is most probably a Phoenician word; the Hebrews were not known to be sailors.

I have read here and there that the Phoenician and Hebrew languages were very close.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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The OLB text was about Min-erva, aka Nyhellenia or better known as "Nehalennia".

Now look at how she is often being depicted:

220px-Nehalennia.jpg

She has her left foot on the prow of a ship, not on a cloud...

.

Yes, she does, the hull.

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Yes, she does, the hull.

That's because I searched rather quickly and could not find the pic where you only see the prow.

But whatever part of the ship is visible, it still is a ship.

I had expected at least someone to say that a possible connection with the Greek word "holkas" would be 'another' proof of the OLB...

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Sorry to disappoint you, but "aak" has an altogether different etymology.

The original word happens to be one that starts with an -N- (like "nako"):

http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/aak1

And I know you will 'love' this:

Some people think that the name Nehalennia is derived from the Hebrew words nahal, meaning to guide and aniah meaning ship. This would indicate the meaning to be guide the ship, i.e. he who guides the ship(s).

http://www.neeltjejans.nl/index.php/en/park-info/origin-of-the-name

:P

But if the name is indeed of Semitic origin, it is most probably a Phoenician word; the Hebrews were not known to be sailors.

I have read here and there that the Phoenician and Hebrew languages were very close.

.

Not realy disappointed here -> So good news :-)

I really love those 'original' words starting with an 'N' and the 'possibles' in official etymologie.

So ape probably comes from nape? From there to the word na-apen! LOL

Other possibility:

'Nako' and 'deN ake' could share the same etymological story as Nineve and "deN In-Heve" or "N'in heve" :-)

But true, den ake could be a misspelling of den naak :-))

Serious, I don't have much to do with Hebrew/Phoenicians, so I don't know much about it/them.

But I know not every single people/language on earth is a deravation of them.

I admit, in that sense I'm a heretic and non-believer.

As long as official etymology can't give a good explanation of the meaning and origin of 'Rome' i don't bother too much with all their other fairy tales.

But thnx for sharing this info.

Edited by Van Gorp

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Serious, I don't have much to do with Hebrew/Phoenicians, so I don't know much about it/them.

But I know not every single people/language on earth is a deravation of them.

I admit, in that sense I'm a heretic and non-believer.

As long as official etymology can't give a good explanation of the meaning and origin of 'Rome' i don't bother too much with all their other fairy tales.

:lol:

I join your club, Van Gorp.

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Not realy disappointed here -> So good news :-)

I really love those 'original' words starting with an 'N' and the 'possibles' in official etymologie.

So ape probably comes from nape? From there to the word na-apen! LOL

Other possibility:

'Nako' and 'deN ake' could share the same etymological story as Nineve and "deN In-Heve" or "N'in heve" :-)

But true, den ake could be a misspelling of den naak :-))

Serious, I don't have much to do with Hebrew/Phoenicians, so I don't know much about it/them.

But I know not every single people/language on earth is a deravation of them.

I admit, in that sense I'm a heretic and non-believer.

As long as official etymology can't give a good explanation of the meaning and origin of 'Rome' i don't bother too much with all their other fairy tales.

But thnx for sharing this info.

Whoever in this thread said or even suggested that every single people/language on earth is a derivation of Hebrews/Phoenicians?

But people travel and leave words and customs where they stay longer than a day.

Most probably you will have no problms with the fact that many Dutch nautical terms ended up in other languages, like English, German, and Russian.

So why should it be a problem if Hebrew/Phoenician words/names ended up in the Netherlands?

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Van Gorp, this guy is even better than you: he explains every word on the planet, from every language, by hacking the words to pieces and then change the pieces into complete Basque words, and finally makes up a sentence that 'explains' the word:

http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~legneref/bronze/nylink2.htm

http://www.faculty.ucr.edu/~legneref/archeol/odysseus.htm

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sneek2012a.jpg

horn2012.jpg

See you there, or not.

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sneek2012a.jpg

horn2012.jpg

See you there, or not.

If I have enough finances (but I don't count on it), you will see me there. Would be great to see you, Knul, Van Gorp, and maybe even Puzzler from Australia, Cormac from the USA, Swede from Sweden (??), and of course Alewyn from South Africa (assumimg you have invited all of them too).

Bickering on the internet about some topic is peanuts, but seeing eachother face to face would be great.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Bickering on the internet about some topic is peanuts, but seeing eachother face to face would be great.

Yes, that would be great.

I will invite the paper-research group too, including dr. Jensma.

Let's work on summarizing our theory, whoever has one.

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