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Still Waters

Scientists succeed in "teleporting" atom by

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Yes, unfortunately; at least using the method described. It's a fairly useless discovery. I did suggest a least one use, cloning parts of oneself for replacement. You don't HAVE to destroy the original matter.

There was one brief voice of reason in this thread that tried to explain to you all that this is not teleportation at all.

Did you listen? No.

You'd rather argue about what happens to the soul when you teleport, and blithely ignore that no teleportation is occuring.

So sad.

You cannot transmit information through quantum entanglement, hence you cannot teleport anything at all that way.

So your "soul" is safe, assuming it was safe before this argument began - which I doubt for some of you.

Harte

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I would be hesitant to "teleport" my own body since it wouldn't be my body that would be teleporting. It would simply make a copy of me in another point of space and the original me would be converted to whatever was in the other part(if I understood the article correctly).

If that is the case then the original me would die and only an exact copy would remain.

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I still cannot understand the process.... say the two object are entangle with each other,, whatever i do with the original will happen to the clone... if the "cloning/not teleportation" be successfull how do they eradicate the original without affecting the other?... If im a scientist imm gonna research more in dimensions or wormhole if my goal is teleportation..that entanglement means murder,,,

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I still cannot understand the process.... say the two object are entangle with each other,, whatever i do with the original will happen to the clone... if the "cloning/not teleportation" be successfull how do they eradicate the original without affecting the other?... If im a scientist imm gonna research more in dimensions or wormhole if my goal is teleportation..that entanglement means murder,,,

AFAIK, only properties are transferred, and it is also very hard to maintain entanglement. You could do it so that the state becomes too unstable after "teleportation". Moving an object or destroying the particles of an object won't do the same to an entangled object elsewhere. The state where properties can transfer between particles does not last forever.

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"Quantum Teleportation" is simply the manipulation of entangled pairs. An agitated electron here changes state, which causes its entangled buddy to change state too. It is not really teleportation at all, more like a transmitted signal. The entanglement happens faster than the speed of light, yes, but somewhat counter-intuitively, it cannot be used to actually communicate faster than light. Nor can it be used to transport matter in any way. No respectable physicist would suggest otherwise and it appears the physicists quoted in the article were taken out of context, likely due to ignorance on your part. Our current understanding is that superluminal communication (such as teleportation) is impossible. Nothing so far even suggests otherwise beyond empty conjecture"

So basically it's got absolutely nothing to do with teleporting. Why did they call it teleporting if it has nothing to do with it?

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So basically it's got absolutely nothing to do with teleporting. Why did they call it teleporting if it has nothing to do with it?

I think it was reported before in popular science magazines as a form of teleportation and it stuck. A shame, really.

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Posted (edited)

You cannot transmit information through quantum entanglement, hence you cannot teleport anything at all that way.

Harte

Harte,

That might not be the case in regards to transmitting information through Quantum Entanglement. (We'll save teleporting for a later decade)

Quantum networks advance with entanglement of photons, solid-state qubits

An impurity in a diamond is illuminated with a powerful laser beam after which it emits a single photon. The oscillations of the emitted photon are entangled with the spin of the electrons in the impurity and this entanglement can be used to send quantum information over long distances. (Illustration: Yiwen Chu, Harvard University).

A team of Harvard physicists led by Mikhail D. Lukin has achieved the first-ever quantum entanglement of photons and solid-state materials. The work marks a key advance toward practical quantum networks, as the first experimental demonstration of a means by which solid-state quantum bits, or "qubits," can communicate with one another over long distances.

quantum networking applications such as long-distance communication and distributed computing would require the nodes that process and store quantum data in qubits to be connected to one another by entanglement, a state where two different atoms become indelibly linked such that one inherits the properties of the other.

"In quantum computing and quantum communication, a big question has been whether or how it would be possible to actually connect qubits, separated by long distances, to one another," says Lukin, professor of physics at Harvard and co-author of a paper describing the work in this week's issue of the journal Nature. "Demonstration of quantum entanglement between a solid-state material and photons is an important advance toward linking qubits together into a quantum network."

Quantum entanglement has previously been demonstrated only with photons and individual ions or atoms.

"Our work takes this one step further, showing how one can engineer and control the interaction between individual photons and matter in a solid-state material," says first author Emre Togan, a graduate student in physics at Harvard. "What's more, we show that the photons can be imprinted with the information stored in a qubit."

Quantum entanglement, famously termed "spooky action at a distance" by a skeptical Albert Einstein, is a fundamental property of quantum mechanics. It allows one to distribute quantum information over tens of thousands of kilometers, limited only by how fast and how far members of the entangled pair can propagate in space.

The new result builds upon earlier work by Lukin's group to use single atom impurities in diamonds as qubits. Lukin and colleagues have previously shown that these impurities can be controlled by focusing laser light on a diamond lattice flaw where nitrogen replaces an atom of carbon. That previous work showed that the so-called spin degrees of freedom of these impurities make excellent quantum memory.

Lukin and his co-authors now say that these impurities are also remarkable because, when excited with a sequence of finely tuned microwave and laser pulses, they can emit photons one at a time, such that photons are entangled with quantum memory. Such a stream of single photons can be used for secure transmission of information.

"Since photons are the fastest carriers of quantum information, and spin memory can robustly store quantum information for relatively long periods of time, entangled spin-photon pairs are ideal for the realization of quantum networks," Lukin says. "Such a network, a quantum analog to the conventional internet, could allow for absolutely secure communication over long distances."

http://www.physorg.com/news200075023.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Can't you just see Noah saying "Riiiiggghhhtttt"....."Lord, what's a Qubit?"

Edited by StarLord

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StarLord, Harte is still (basically) correct.

What your link is referring to is using the entanglement to ensure a secure communication channel. Harte was pointing out that you can't use entanglement to send a message to someone else. Your article points out that you can use entangled particles to send a message in a classical manner.

In other words: entangled particles do "communicate" with each other - the phase evolution of each component is linked. However we are not able to measure the individual state of each component (without breaking the entanglement), and therefore we cannot use this "communication" to send external information.

As your article states, you can use entangled particles to send information in a classical manner - i.e. via photons through fiber optics, as described in the article. The information is sent via a classical state: perhaps simply via the length of time between each photon (sort of a binary code, perhaps).

The quantum state, i.e. the spin, can also be measured at the same time. Since measuring the photons destroys the entanglement, depending on the distribution of the photon spins compared to that of the original qubit you can tell if any eavesdropped on your signal.

I suppose this means you can send information via entanglement, as long as it is the answer to one question: are these particles entangled with X or not?

This is very useful in making sure your communication channel has not been compromised, however it is not useful for sending meaningful messages. You need to rely on classical methods to achieve that.

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So basically it's got absolutely nothing to do with teleporting. Why did they call it teleporting if it has nothing to do with it?

It is you are teleporting one atoms state to another. Speed for example, atomic spin and the atoms position.

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Harte,

That might not be the case in regards to transmitting information through Quantum Entanglement. (We'll save teleporting for a later decade)

In quantum cryptogoly you can tell if the encrption key has been read if the wavefunction has been collapsed. That is a way to send a signal. Someone at position A decides if he will read it or not and someone at position B finds out if its been read.

Further more 1000 keys could be used to form a 1000 digit bit which is enought combinations to use as a message.

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In quantum cryptogoly you can tell if the encrption key has been read if the wavefunction has been collapsed. That is a way to send a signal. Someone at position A decides if he will read it or not and someone at position B finds out if its been read.

Further more 1000 keys could be used to form a 1000 digit bit which is enought combinations to use as a message.

And if you set up that "1,000 digit bit" to resemble binary code, could you not use it to send words like we see here, each different digital bit representing a different letter?

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And if you set up that "1,000 digit bit" to resemble binary code, could you not use it to send words like we see here, each different digital bit representing a different letter?

No, because the person at B does not know what the original state of the "1000 digit bit" was. Unless he knows the specific state, his measurement will be at least partly randomized and it is unlikely he will recover the full message.

If the person at B does know the original state, then there is no point in sending the message.

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How about the state of being either off, not sending or on, sending / ready to send on agreed upon space ? In other words, an agreed upon state -interval- that can be identified as "on" and another state that can be identified as "off", once the agreed upon state occurs, would not sending that 1000 digit bit then make sense?

Edited by StarLord

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Still, it's a lovely idea. If it could be done, then you could regularly get back ups of your pattern, maybe once a week or something. If you died, could paste the backup pattern onto a new material matrix, and then have a new you. But, unfortunately, this is really just a selfish thing, because it wouldn't REALLY be you. It'd be like birthing a fully grown new you, really just to help the living, not you at all. The original you, the older you, would still be dead, the new you would have the same memories and be identical in every way except in actually being you. Still, it is a kind of immortality...

Greed in that manner.

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***Edited***

Edited by Resonance

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There was one brief voice of reason in this thread that tried to explain to you all that this is not teleportation at all.

Did you listen? No.

You'd rather argue about what happens to the soul when you teleport, and blithely ignore that no teleportation is occuring.

So sad.

You cannot transmit information through quantum entanglement, hence you cannot teleport anything at all that way.

So your "soul" is safe, assuming it was safe before this argument began - which I doubt for some of you.

Harte

Again, for those of you who haven't researched the topic.... Harte is 100% correct.

Yet, are you saying that an 'electron' isn't information, Harte?

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How about the state of being either off, not sending or on, sending / ready to send on agreed upon space ? In other words, an agreed upon state -interval- that can be identified as "on" and another state that can be identified as "off", once the agreed upon state occurs, would not sending that 1000 digit bit then make sense?

Yes. You can send information that way.

That is classical information, the same kind we use right now in phone lines, fiber optics, even smoke signals.

Again, for those of you who haven't researched the topic.... Harte is 100% correct.Yet, are you saying that an 'electron' isn't information, Harte?

I doubt Harte is saying that an electron isn't information. He is probably saying an electron isn't quantum information.

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