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Still Waters

Tasmanian tigers brought to life

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THE LARGEST PRIVATE COLLECTION of Tasmanian tiger artefacts sheds light on how the dog-like marsupials were driven to extinction.

The permanent exhibition on the thylacine has opened at the Wilderness Gallery at Tasmania's Cradle Mountain, and includes relics such as a model of a thylacine skeleton and a rug composed of eight skins.

"It's marvellous stuff: decorative objects like rugs are rare, because people didn't like the animals, so they weren't keen to preserve bits of them in their houses," says Kathryn Medlock, curator of vertebrate zoology at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, which jointly developed the exhibition.

The thylacine has become an Australian icon since its extinction in the early 20th century at the hands of Tasmanian hunters. However, according to Dr Nic Haygarth, an historian at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, mystery and fear surrounded the thylacine in years past.

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Posted (edited)

Finally!

Edited by xXHellkittiesXx

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Awwww.... I thought this would be a thread about the thylocenes being cloned and grown into real animals. :-(

I think the title is a little misleading. :-(

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There is education, but those who need it most are not receptive to it. Extinction of species is a real concern and everyone needs to understand what this means for the planet. When humans take far more than they need and give nothing in return to the planet, we are left with this problem. Awareness and education are a must to get the message across to everyone.

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There is education, but those who need it most are not receptive to it. Extinction of species is a real concern and everyone needs to understand what this means for the planet. When humans take far more than they need and give nothing in return to the planet, we are left with this problem. Awareness and education are a must to get the message across to everyone.

What does it mean for the planet? Species have come and gone for millennia, and it's usually been that the planet is what screwed them over! When humans take far more than they need, they make corpulent corpses that are best put in the ground so that the planet can reclaim what had been taken. "The planet" wants for nothing.

Awwww.... I thought this would be a thread about the thylocenes being cloned and grown into real animals. :-(

That would have been great.

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I'm afraid that cloning them would be a bad idea. Say we do clone them, then what? Put them in a zoo? What does it tell our children? "Hey kids, extinction is bad and all, but don't worry too much about it, we can just clone the animals back."

Cloning the Thylacine is no different than a rich kids parents buying him a brand new car after he totaled his previous one on a drunken bender. We killed it off, yes, but we have to live with that, and every other species we have drove to extinction. We screwed up, as a species, many times, and I don't think it would be very healthy to go around cloning away our mistakes, as horrible, and sad as they may be.

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I'm afraid that cloning them would be a bad idea. Say we do clone them, then what? Put them in a zoo? What does it tell our children? "Hey kids, extinction is bad and all, but don't worry too much about it, we can just clone the animals back."

Cloning the Thylacine is no different than a rich kids parents buying him a brand new car after he totaled his previous one on a drunken bender. We killed it off, yes, but we have to live with that, and every other species we have drove to extinction. We screwed up, as a species, many times, and I don't think it would be very healthy to go around cloning away our mistakes, as horrible, and sad as they may be.

I like you thinking. It makes sense. However, would you clone a dinosaur? Even though we didn't kill them, it would send the same message - Don't worry about consequences because we can bring them back.

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I like you thinking. It makes sense. However, would you clone a dinosaur? Even though we didn't kill them, it would send the same message - Don't worry about consequences because we can bring them back.

I don't think I would advocate the cloning of a dinosaur either. True, humans were not the cause of their end, however, it would still be a mistake.

For example say we clone a dinosaur, say Compsognathus, something relatively harmless, especially when compared to say, a Velociraptor. This dinosaur occupied a niche that is now occupied by contemporary animals. 65 million years is a long time to be gone, and to suddenly re-introduce the species may be the most damaging thing we could do to the environment.

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Awwww.... I thought this would be a thread about the thylocenes being cloned and grown into real animals. :-(

I think the title is a little misleading. :-(

me too... dern. they should hurry up already

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Tasmanian Tigers brought to life? Where now?

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i demand cloned dinosaurs NOW

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The titles of this thread and the article are deceiving. <_<

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I have a hard time understanding why people want to clone this animal out of extinction. We should learn from our mistakes, not erase them.

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I have a hard time understanding why people want to clone this animal out of extinction. We should learn from our mistakes, not erase them.

Cloning Tasmanian Tigers out of extinction would not erase anything. They would still be basically extinct except for in captivity, and to have a good breeding population we'd have to take great pangs to set up reserves and all of that. We can learn from our mistakes without being defeatist about it and wanting to keep the consequences permanent.

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Cloning Tasmanian Tigers out of extinction would not erase anything. They would still be basically extinct except for in captivity, and to have a good breeding population we'd have to take great pangs to set up reserves and all of that. We can learn from our mistakes without being defeatist about it and wanting to keep the consequences permanent.

Merriam-Websters Learner's Dictionary

cap·tiv·i·ty /kæpˈtɪvəti/ noun

[noncount] : the state of being kept in a place (such as a prison or a cage) and not being able to leave or be free : the state or condition of being captive

cap·tive /ˈkæptɪv/ adjective

1 : captured and kept in a prison, cage, etc.

No creature should be made to exist purely for that purpose. Cloned or not.

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Awwww.... I thought this would be a thread about the thylocenes being cloned and grown into real animals. :-(

I think the title is a little misleading. :-(

Same, I am disapoint.

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This has to be at least the third time i've seen a title about bringing thylacines back and they never deliver!.

as for the debate over whether we should bring extinct creatures beck to life i say do it!

No creature should be made to exist purely for that purpose. Cloned or not.

you make it sound like they would be kept in poor conditions, anyone with the funding and the means to clone an extinct animal back into existence is not going to go through the effort just to see it rot in a cage.

would you still argue the same point if the animals were kept in a three acre bio dome perfectly simulating their natural habbit, with limited contact to humans and live prey to hunt?

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This has to be at least the third time i've seen a title about bringing thylacines back and they never deliver!.

as for the debate over whether we should bring extinct creatures beck to life i say do it!

you make it sound like they would be kept in poor conditions, anyone with the funding and the means to clone an extinct animal back into existence is not going to go through the effort just to see it rot in a cage.

would you still argue the same point if the animals were kept in a three acre bio dome perfectly simulating their natural habbit, with limited contact to humans and live prey to hunt?

I was replying to a comment that said if they were brought back they would be living in captivity. My opinion on whether we should attempt to clone the animal is irrelevant to that.

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What does it mean for the planet? Species have come and gone for millennia, and it's usually been that the planet is what screwed them over! When humans take far more than they need, they make corpulent corpses that are best put in the ground so that the planet can reclaim what had been taken. "The planet" wants for nothing.

At a much different rate, from other causes.

Just think about it...

An species fading from existence as a result of natural selection vs. a species being avidly hunted be humans.

Which one will go faster?

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