Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
Still Waters

Epic pi quest sets 10 trillion digit record

17 posts in this topic

A pair of pi enthusiasts have calculated the largest chunk of the mathematical constant yet, reaching just over 10 trillion digits. Alexander Yee and Shigeru Kondo, respectively a computer scientist in the US and a systems engineer in Japan, fought hard-drive failures and narrowly missed widespread technical disruptions due to the Japan earthquake to break their previous Guinness world record of 5 trillion digits.

As the title of the announcement on their website - "Same program, same computer, just a longer wait..." - suggests, it was only a matter of time before the record was smashed. Indeed, calculating so many digits of pi serves no useful mathematical purposes - pi goes on forever, but just 39 digits are enough to calculate the circumference of a circle the size of the observable universe with an error no larger than the radius of a hydrogen atom.

Yet, as demonstrated by Yee and Kondo's recent epic quest - which was particularly fraught this time around - the feat still sparks intense passion, a testament to the enduring fascination with this curious ratio.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chuck Norris can calculate it to infinity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, Chuck Norris can calculate it to infinity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nice :S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe it's time for a celebration. Science has yet again achieved redundancy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...pi enthusiasts...

These exist? :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it really necessary to calculate it to ten trillion digits?? Cant they just be happy with 3.14?? Or why not just make it 3.15?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree completely with you, Draconis. :unsure2: Why don't they do something more creative with their time? Or are they too smart?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a pi enthusiast, does pi ever start showing a pattern, or is it complete randomness even up to ten trillion digits?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

randomness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems like quite a massive waste of time and effort.

What exactly are we going to really get out of this? if the ten trillionth digit through the ten trillionth and tenth digit end up being 3.14 <ten trillion digits> 12345678910.... Would that change anything?

Focus on something that will make a difference in the world...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I totally agree with what everyone's been saying, there's really no benefit to the world with this discovery, I'm not going to be using a trillion digits to help me with my division.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is what nerds do when they're bored.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's with the negativity? It's a couple of guys doing something pointless but awesome.

Far more computer power and time is "wasted" on video games or watching cats play the piano on YouTube.

Lighten up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about the square root of two and three? They forgot those. ohmy.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PI is used in some cryptography cyphers (or parts of PI), so, it's not a complete waste.

Also, if i'm not mistaken, isn't it possible for, say, on the 10 trillion and 1st digit Pi might just start repeating itself. A finding like that would have huge implications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 months and drying laundry in the room to make this calculation? Really?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.