Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4
cladking

A Well Supported Theory about Pyramids

799 posts in this topic

At last someone has come up with a good idea about great pyramids.

http://www.youtube.com/user/patrickgiles22

This is superbly evidenced and can even explain what the units of measurements

on the Palermo Stone mean. The Palermo Stone is hugely important because it con-

tains most of the very very little we know about the great pyramid builders. Up

till now we didn't know what these numbers were but maybe it was the total amount

of water that was caught in the Lake of the Year. The Pyramid Texts said this

number was calculated so perhaps they had to add up all the events and subtract

out what was used for other purposes. The equations could get pretty complicated

with a pyramid sitting in the middle of the lake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting thoery but seems an awful lot of trouble to go to just to collect water, which was generally in plentiful supply in that area due to the annual flooding of the NIle. Also, if this was the reason for the pyramids being built, why the complex interior? In my humble opinion it just doesnt hold water (scuse the pun) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting thoery but seems an awful lot of trouble to go to just to collect water, which was generally in plentiful supply in that area due to the annual flooding of the NIle. Also, if this was the reason for the pyramids being built, why the complex interior? In my humble opinion it just doesnt hold water (scuse the pun) :)

Sure, I agree, but the fact is this theory doesn't depend on assumptions

like orthodoxy and most others do. The first thing they built was always

the water catchment device and then they built the pyramids. There is even

water erosion described by Petrie in the canals leading away from the water

catchment. So this theory is demonstrably true on some levels.

Obviousaly it's illogical to build a huge pyramid in the middle of your

"rain bucket" but this doesn't change the fact that they actually caught

water. It doesn't change the fact that this water was so important that

they named their years after the amount that was caught.

Don't forget the water in the Nile was warm, muddy, and loaded with para-

sites and crocodiles. The builders spoke of cool effervescent water that

was violent and caused abundance and rainbows. They also even had a God

of rain which harnessed the kas of the Gods who was named Nehebkau. His

multitudinous coils were the clouds. There would never be rainbows in the

river yet they described rainbows in detail. Rain is infrequent in this

desert and probably wasn't much more common in the pyramid building age but

it does come nearly every year. They probably got about 5" per year in

the pyramid building age.

There's also a cistern in Khentkawes Town which is directly downhill from

the water catchment device surrounding G2. This cistern can not be filled

by a downpour which very strongly suggests that water was retained at the

pyramid and slowly released. This particular water catchment device even

gets mentioned in the Pyramid Texts (how's that for proof).

I'd say his theory is pure genius even if he is overlooking a few obvious

facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where's the ramp?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You say ''I'd say his theory is pure genius even if he is overlooking a few obvious

facts.

His theory might well be pure genius, but anyone giving a theory cannot possibly overlook obvious facts as surely this would leave his theory open to question?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You say ''I'd say his theory is pure genius even if he is overlooking a few obvious

facts.

His theory might well be pure genius, but anyone giving a theory cannot possibly overlook obvious facts as surely this would leave his theory open to question?

As I see it we're all just a bunch of blind men trying to identify an elephant. We

all have different knowledge sets and unique perspectives. As a rule Egyptologists have

the greatest amount of information and have done the permutations of the positions of the

hairs on the tail. But somehow they've managed to get every single thing wrong. They started

with a few absurd assumptions and then never went back and looked at them in light of new

evidence. Ratgher than identifying an elephant they think it's a herd of mice pulling a

pumpkin shaped carriage.

But where Egyptologists started with something that never existed this guy is starting

with something that is factual. This is real. It's concrete. It's not an assumption. This

makes a sound foundation upon which to build. Ramps could and must have literally been

built atop these water catchment devices if they actually existed. Of course ramps might

interfere with water flow so again ramps might be ruled out.

We need to chuck out the mice and carriage and get back to the data. Start construction on

water catchment devices and go from there.

Perhaps this is the point of the guy who came up with this. Perhaps this is a philosopi-

cal statement more than a proposed usage for the pyramid. Everybody knows that building

a 6 1/2 million ton obstruction in a catchment would be a lot of work. Perhaps he's even

implying that the catchment might be related to the means to build the big obstruction.

But whatever the actual case this is a sound foundation for the new Egyptology. This is

a foundation for an egyptology striving toward answers rather than starting with answers

that lead nowhere at all. The old Egyptology is stuck in a twilight zone where the sun

never sets nor rises. All the Giza pyramids lie between them and the light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not such a bad idea I think. Not much to say but it could also mean the pyramid was used for for than one purpose. Not only was it for shooting your soul out to Orion but it could also collect water. How about this too, because of the thought of little rain - I hear the natural covering was limestone, which usually has water dripping from it, maybe it caught the water that dripped, seeped out of the limestone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear the natural covering was limestone, which usually has water dripping from it, maybe it caught the water that dripped, seeped out of the limestone.

What the...??

That is even more absurd than the "water collection" idea.

Harte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What the...??

That is even more absurd than the "water collection" idea.

Harte

lol fair enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviousaly it's illogical to build a huge pyramid in the middle of your

"rain bucket"

It is illogical to build huge pyramids in the middle of anywhere just to collect water. It took thousands of workers a number of years and huge cost to build those pyramids and a civilization that was mathematically advanced enough to build such huge marvels would have been aware that it was a lot simpler and cheaper to build two cisterns and connect them rather than one pyramid and one cistern.

p.s: Wasn't Egyptian calender more centered around the Nile rather than the amount of water that the pyramids caught?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What the...??

That is even more absurd than the "water collection" idea.

Surely you aren't suggesting Petrie was absurd. You'd be excommunicated you know.

"From this remarkable forking, it [p. 50] is evident that the trench cannot have been made with any ideas of sighting along it, or of its marking out a direction or azimuth; and, starting as it does, from the basalt pavement (or from any building which stood there), and running with a steady fall to the nearest point of the cliff edge, it seems exactly as if intended for a drain; the more so as there is plainly a good deal of water-weanng at a point where it falls sharply, at its enlargement."

He went to a lot of effort to hide the most important fact about G1 in a 92 word

sentence but you still aren't allowed to doubt its veracity. There was water at all

the great pyramids that was collected. Even Djoser's Pyramid is surrounded by a moat.

They used water to level the site and there is extensive evidence for water on site.

It's thirsty work building ramps. This even applies to ramps sitting in catchment

basins. My guess is they couldn't have both so they went without ramps. Ramps are

an absurd idea for building pyramids anyway.

Of course if you merely meant that the pyramid's function was intended solely to catch

rain water coming from clouds then I'd be forced to agree it really is absurd.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course if you merely meant that the pyramid's function was intended solely to catch

rain water coming from clouds then I'd be forced to agree it really is absurd.

I can't view your vid at work.

Any large construction project has to take drainage into account.

I don't see anywhere in Petrie's writings on this where he implies water was to be collected by the pyramid.

Obviously, in the case of rain, water would be collected in the interior (and on the pavement surrounding) the unfinished G.P. This rainwater would need to be drained to continue operations.

This is what Petrie said the trenches were for.

Harte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is illogical to build huge pyramids in the middle of anywhere just to collect water.

Yes and no. I tend to agree and definitely agree it's very safe to rule

out building a 6 1/2 million ton pyramid that would be of no benefit in

collecting rain water. There is a remote chance that the pyramid was in-

tended largely as a plug on water seeping up out of the ground in order

to gain control over this water but, this too is doubtful.

It would make sense if pyramids could collect water but they can't.

It took thousands of workers a number of years and huge cost to build those pyramids...

It's not known how the pyramids were built. Depending on the methods em-

ployed it might have required anywhere between 3% and 120% of GDP. The

builders clearly said that the Gods built them so I tend to favor the lower

estimates. (the Gods didn't supply their Own rope)

This is a critical consideration. It's never even been shown that the ex-

tremely labor intensive means to build coulsd actually work. There may be no

way to build the entire pyramid using ramps since the ramps would have to be

removed and then rebuilt to apply the cladding. The ramps would already require

more effort than the pyramid and applying cladding would double this work.

The evidence seems to suggest that working on the pyramid was a highly prized job

that was awarded by lottery to the cities where men came from who made major ad-

vancements in the past. This implies there were very few jobs on the pyramid

which is supported by the fact that there are almost no graves anywhere in Egypt

of pyramid builders. Gods neither drip corpse secretions nor occupy graves when

they die so there's is no reason to expect big pyramid building towns or big

graveyards full of builders. All the evidence fits a specific pattern which

suggests the builders weren't mad and meant what they said.

...and a civilization that was mathematically advanced enough to build such huge marvels would have been aware that it was a lot simpler and cheaper to build two cisterns and connect them rather than one pyramid and one cistern.

There's really no question that the argument as presented is wrong. The reason

for building great pyramids was not as rain catchment.

p.s: Wasn't Egyptian calender more centered around the Nile rather than the amount of water that the pyramids caught?

It's a virtual certainty that the Egyptian calender was centered around the stars

and astronomical observation. Their math was probably largely observation of the

interaction of numbers and philosophical truisms. The Nile tended to flood on schedule

each year since the monsoons were fairly regular.

High Nile was important tothe Egyptians and its effects were the most important thing

each year to the overall economy. However, every indicatiuon is the inundation came

to Giza and it was the inundation that was recorded on the Palermo Stone. The amount

listed in the records was far to little to be the height of the Nile. But the height

of the inundation was of extreme importance because this water was used for numerous

critical purposes and was the manifestation of the entire earthly ennead. This cool

effervescent inundation was the Gods on earth. It was at the very root of this pyra-

mid building culture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't view your vid at work.

Any large construction project has to take drainage into account.

I don't see anywhere in Petrie's writings on this where he implies water was to be collected by the pyramid.

Obviously, in the case of rain, water would be collected in the interior (and on the pavement surrounding) the unfinished G.P. This rainwater would need to be drained to continue operations.

This is what Petrie said the trenches were for.

Petrie believed in a large straight on ramp which would leave the water catchment

device wide open and draining water in a rain. Today this belief has been utterly

rejected by almost everyone. The water catchment device wouldn't work and would be

unnecessary with other systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may be no

way to build the entire pyramid using ramps since the ramps would have to be

removed and then rebuilt to apply the cladding. The ramps would already require

more effort than the pyramid and applying cladding would double this work.

I misspoke a little bit here. This is actually more of an argument which

disproves all the fly by night, integral, or attached to the side ramping

systems that people invent. I don't know why it never occured to me before

but all these systems are ruled out by the need to apply cladding on the way

down which is an impossibility.

This simply rules out virtually every single ramping idea but especially im-

portant is it rules out most of the contra-evidenced spiral ramps. Only Leh-

ner's theory survives since the ramps rest on the ground. Internal ramps sur-

vive as well. Petrie's ramp survives. None of these ideas are consistent

with the vertical lines however and all the other arguments and evidence against

them still stand.

This argument wasn't appropriate here but was on my mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It would make sense if pyramids could collect water but they can't.

Good video. This is along the lines of what I've always felt GP1 was initially intended for: water resource management.

Keep in mind that the surface area of GP's 4 sides is vastly immense and reaches up into the air off the floor of the plateau. Also, due to the thermal mass of the structure, as well as its white tura cladding, it's surface temperature would remain fairly constant through day and night. This would allow the pyramid to literally pull moisture from the atmosphere via condensation every day, regardless of season, and in potentially significant amounts.

So you have rain, condensation, and ground water all being directed by the pyramid into the relatively small volume enclosure that surrounds its base. Pretty smart folks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.

I bet somebody got laid for this idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good video. This is along the lines of what I've always felt GP1 was initially intended for: water resource management.

Keep in mind that the surface area of GP's 4 sides is vastly immense and reaches up into the air off the floor of the plateau. Also, due to the thermal mass of the structure, as well as its white tura cladding, it's surface temperature would remain fairly constant through day and night. This would allow the pyramid to literally pull moisture from the atmosphere via condensation every day, regardless of season, and in potentially significant amounts.

So you have rain, condensation, and ground water all being directed by the pyramid into the relatively small volume enclosure that surrounds its base. Pretty smart folks.

Thank you. Very good points.

The idea of condensation has occured to me before but I was forced to

reject it because of the low humidity conditions of the desert. Perhaps

I dismissed it too quickly since humidity goes up in the middle of the

summer when the wind switches to the north.

There are conditions under which significant amounts of condensation

would have occured but I believe as a source of water alone these condi-

tions were far too infrequent to warrant construction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.

I bet somebody got laid for this idea.

I've always said the white and red pyramids were to denote hot and cold running water. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are conditions under which significant amounts of condensation

would have occured but I believe as a source of water alone these condi-

tions were far too infrequent to warrant construction.

Agreed...which is why I said this:

So you have rain, condensation, and ground water all being directed by the pyramid into the relatively small volume enclosure that surrounds its base

Sorry you missed it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.

I bet somebody got laid for this idea.

I see some problems with this. I doubt that you could get so much water on a regular basis.

Over the summer the pyramid will warm up near the surface and condensation will decrease. You

might actually get so much initially but when the wind is wrong and as the season wears on

the amount decreases.

A bigger problem is that this catchment device is designed to handle far larger amounts of

water than a mere 6000 gallons. If intended for a small amount of water it would be much

narrower around the pyramid (G2's water catchment is several times the size of the pyramid)

and it would be very carefully sloped so all the water ran to a specific location. While

the G1 catchment does funnel the water to the so called mortuary temple it is not carefully

sloped. There are low and high spots so much of the water would sit in low spots where it

would be difficult to collect and would tend to evaporate away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry you missed it.

I'm certainly in agreement that they had sources of water on the plateau which

orthodoxy refuses to even consider. I'm certainly in agreement that condensation

would be one of these sources. I merely can't agree that condensation could be

sufficient reason to build a great pyramid.

Edited to add that they might have built and designed the pyramid the way they did

to maximize condensation but not that it was a machine to generate condensate.

Edited by cladking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where's the ramp?

Hahahahahaha nice one

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To put things into perspective,

Assuming the GP has an exposed surface area of about 925,000 sq ft.;

If each square YARD could produce a single cup of water per day via condensation,

Over 6,000 new gallons of fresh water would be seen in the enclosure every morning.

I bet somebody got laid for this idea.

6000 gallons is considerably less than one-one hundredth of the amount of water rolling by in a single second in the Nile, at the time only a few hundred meters away.

Bet nobody got laid for an idea that didn't exist. If it did, it was a solution to a problem that didn't exist.

Harte

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting thoery but seems an awful lot of trouble to go to just to collect water, which was generally in plentiful supply in that area due to the annual flooding of the NIle. Also, if this was the reason for the pyramids being built, why the complex interior? In my humble opinion it just doesnt hold water (scuse the pun) :)

This was my initial reaction when I seen this as well. However what if the water collection aspect was made after the pyramids were completed and someone thought hmmmm, we can collect this water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 4

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.