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Persia

Lost cities found beneath sands of Sahara

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Satellite images have revealed the ruins of a long-lost civilisation which existed in what is now the Sahara desert in Roman times and before. Archaeologists hope that the toppling of Libyan dictator Colonel Gadaffi, who has controlled access to the region in modern times, will permit the secrets of the lost cities beneath the sands to be unravelled properly at last.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/09/lost_cities_sahara/

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Oh wow! That's so cool. I can't wait to learn more!

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Oh wow! That's so cool. I can't wait to learn more!

I know! me too! I would love to see some more pics of the buildings/area

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Hopefully the truth won't remain hidden. Somehow, archeologists and historians have difficult time understanding history may have to be re-written.

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This is exciting.

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"lost cities" and "castles in the desert". This sounds awesome!

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Perhaps some coordinates, to look in Google Earth? :-)

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Amazing. Can't wait to learn more.

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that is awesome

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Interesting granted, but does not look much more than a neolithic site to me. Sparsely populated, few buildings, in short... unremarkable. hardly a "Lost Civilisation".

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At least something good might come of it then.

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This is great.I hope they show some photos of what they have discovered. The funny thing is,my late father was in North Africa during World War 2. I recall him talking about flying over the Libyan desert,and you could see from the air where there once had been what appeared to be towns or cities.He also mentioned about rock paintings out in North Africa too.

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There's got to be so many cities under sand and water. It would be cool if they brush off the sand and find a new world wonder.

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Interesting granted, but does not look much more than a neolithic site to me. Sparsely populated, few buildings, in short... unremarkable. hardly a "Lost Civilisation".

Hum... you've been there already??? Wow.. can you tell more?

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It's Lovecraft's "Nameless City"! Irem, the City of Pillars!

Of course that was supposed to be in the Arabian Peninsula. Close enough, I guess...

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Wow, just like in the movies!

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This is nothing new. IN 1984 one of the space shuttles used radar to map the Sahara desert. The radar penetrated several feet in the gound and reveraled many ancient rivers and man made structures.

So 27 years have passed since those radar pictures were made and what has happened? Practically nothing. Why? Very simple. The academic system (the same one that gives us Penn State and their perverts) did not want to do anything. They can blame the late leader of Libya, but that is an excuse.

There is no doubt that if all these ruines were opened the history books will have to be rewritten and that is something the professors do not want to do.

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That will be interesting as we learn more and more about them and the roles they had in the rest of the world's trade, government, and technologies. Particularly interested in if they had ships and such. If so what kind? What kind of a religion, too. All that will be a long time coming I bet.

It is amazing the new places that have opened up to the world for all of science to investigate. Mongolia, China, Turkey, Peruvian highlands, etc. I wish the drug growing fields and forests of Colombia were accessible so we can have more of the whole story of the cultures that flourished there.

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This is nothing new. IN 1984 one of the space shuttles used radar to map the Sahara desert. The radar penetrated several feet in the gound and reveraled many ancient rivers and man made structures.

So 27 years have passed since those radar pictures were made and what has happened? Practically nothing. Why? Very simple. The academic system (the same one that gives us Penn State and their perverts) did not want to do anything. They can blame the late leader of Libya, but that is an excuse.

There is no doubt that if all these ruines were opened the history books will have to be rewritten and that is something the professors do not want to do.

*snip*

Edited by libstaK
personal attack

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Could this be the site of the remains of what they thought was the 15000 year old civilization mentioned in 2003 ?

http://www.fromthestars.com/_ancient%20civilizations/page50_h.html

some photos.. of the Libya's south western desert... more than 100 fortified farms, villages with Castlelike structures... at the moment they are saying it is from AD1-500... But ;)

http://www.heritagedaily.com/2011/11/castles-in-the-desert-satellites-reveal-lost-cities-of-libya/

Edited by crystal sage

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Interesting site here...

It is possible that only one percent of the wonders of Ancient Egypt have been discovered, but now, thanks to a pioneering approach to archaeology, that is about to change. Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellites to probe beneath the sands, where she has found cities, temples and pyramids. Now, with Dallas Campbell and Liz Bonnin, she heads to Egypt to discover if these magnificent buildings are really there. Seventeen lost pyramids are among the buildings identified in a new satellite survey of Egypt. More than 1,000 tombs and 3,000 ancient settlements were also revealed by looking at infra-red images which show up underground buildings. Initial excavations have already confirmed some of the findings, including two suspected pyramids.

http://www.downeu.net/documentaries/627591-bbc-egypts-lost-cities-2011-pdtv-xvid-ac3-mvgroup.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b011pwms

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-13522957

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Very cool.

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Wow this is great - can't wait to hear more about what they find. I'll be peeved if funding becomes an issue, too many people lack imagination these days IMO.

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Wow this is great - can't wait to hear more about what they find. I'll be peeved if funding becomes an issue, too many people lack imagination these days IMO.

It appears that funding is the issue with most digs... especially now in Turkey ... If digs aren't occupied for a certain length of time.. licences are said to be revoked ... Which is causing concerns around the Gobleki Tepe site...and other surrounding sites..

http://blog.bibleplaces.com/2011/08/turkey-revoking-foreign-excavation.html

Although many of Turkeys myriad archaeological sites such as Ephesus, Antioch, Troy, Knidos, Alacahöyük and Hattuşa were initially found and dug by foreign archaeologists, recent announcements from Turkeys Culture and Tourism Ministry suggest this will soon change. The recent cancellation of several licenses for important digs that had been run by foreign scientists for decades, has precipitated a new debate on how to evaluate archaeological studies.

Some of the foreign-run excavations are going well, but some groups only come here, work for 15 days and leave, Culture and Tourism Minister Ertuğrul Günay said regarding the reason for the canceled licenses. We are not going to allow that. If they dont work on it, they should hand it over.

Among this years canceled licenses are Xanthos, Letoon and Aizonai in the provinces of Antalya, Muğla and Kütahya, respectively. The excavations had been conducted by French and German teams for many decades.

http://politicalarchaeology.wordpress.com/

Edited by crystal sage

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It appears that funding is the issue with most digs... especially now in Turkey ... If digs aren't occupied for a certain length of time.. licences are said to be revoked ... Which is causing concerns around the Gobleki Tepe site...and other surrounding sites..

Wow! Where was I when this became known? That is horrible.

None of us want to wait a lifetime for significant finds to be analyzed and published, like what happened due to the stubborn scholars of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Applying too much pressure, isn't the answer either. Too much of that can cause losses in important data. However, these may not even be factors in the government's policy making.

Just because the government has control of permits and access to sites, I doubt that they are going to overturn the lengthy established methods of the academics in this field of science, just to get the right to continue work in Turkey. Although the understanding of the site's place in history will be shared; the site, artifacts, and commercial value are Turkey's natural resource to regulate. That, however, doesn't mean they have the privilege to turn on its head, the manner of conducting this kind of science... You start a project, you get to complete it!

Sites in Turkey weren't of much interest because there were still so many sites to do in Iraq. But the war made that inaccessible, so Turkey became interesting. Perhaps they realize they won't be interesting after Iraq stabilizes--assuming it does.

If I were in need of finding a site typical to my field of study, I would not consider Turkey at all, because of such behavior. The intellectual property of data from the dig is your own. Your published findings of final determinations, your climb up the ladder of that field, and your career, are all difficult enough to accomplish without the government's help.

How could you roll the dice to pick a life long investigation where they might toss you out on your butt? How can you obtain funding for such work? Who would want to fund a site that may be taken over so a Turk can suddenly publish all the final finding and get the fame of it?

There has already been enough of that from the war in Iraq. Missionary and humanistic works and archaeology all had to be put on hold for the purpose of war.

I think the US government might should say to Turkey, "You know last year we helped you dudes out with this, that, and the other. We may not be able to sell you those F-18s you were interested in. Now what was this about our scholars not being able to complete the work you allowed them to begin? Actually the government needs to back some of these projects to stabilize their progress.

Or they could say, "It sure is difficult to fly to the heights of your ability when you have to fly with all these turkeys."

Humm, I wonder if the Windgate Foundation in Siloam Springs is interested in art recovery and the study of that media and techniques from archeology? They give about $US100 million in art grants each year. Let me know if their address is needed to research this.

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