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Still Waters

Was Uffington White Horse really a unicorn?

60 posts in this topic

these people were my ancestors . and i will not have people bending truth for fiction, fantasy,fun .

Given the demographics of this place, those people were probably the ancestors of most posters.

Mine were native Britons.

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Call in the evolutionists.They cab probably attest this possibility the best.

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these people were my ancestors . and i will not have people bending truth for fiction, fantasy,fun .

Hmm interesting - they are also my ancestors, but I will draw your attention to:

it is also the place where king alfred who was one of the last true kings of england in the 800,s fought off saxon invaders . after summoning an army with the blowing stone AKA the rock of england (research that it will blow your minds )

The blowing stone is nothing more than a legend, so not sure where you get your 'truth' from, what is the likelyhood of a king who's lung capacity was so massive that he could blow this stone and create a loud enough noise that attracted the local villagers to fight the viking invaders - indeed a king who according to legend had health problems for all his adult life and someone whom it has been suggested may have suffered from Crohns Disease - seems more likely to be 'fantasy', something which you seem to be against?

I also wanted to point out that it was actually VIKING invaders that Alfred fought off - the Danes had been attacking England from 868 to 880 when the Viking leader was surrounded and sued for peace and wasforceably baptised as a Christian by Alfred along with 29 of his leaders.

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Call in the evolutionists.They can probably attest this possibility the best.

You seem bent on twisting any discussion into a discussion about evolution. You must have nightmares about Darwin and evolution, lol.

==

I still haven't seen an explanation why this 'horse' resembles a running (wild)cat in many ways. It has a long slender body, it has whiskers (or fangs if you like), very UNlike a horse. Well, I had an explanation... just turn back a page.

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Lol, then those things would be really huge lips.Man, the Uffington horse looks nothing like a horse.

Either the socalled 'repairs' throughout the ages destroyed the original horse-image beyond recognition, or it was never meant to depict a horse.

I didn't want to post it in the "Oera Linda" thread, but it could be one of Freya's cats (she drove a carriage pulled by cats). In that thread I tried to explain that one of the alternative names for the 'Heel Stone' (in Stonehenge), 'Freya's He-ol' is nothing but 'Freya's Hall' or Sessrumnir, an alternative name some Nordic gave to Stonehenge.

freya1.gif

.

maa_durga_indiaimagine05.jpg

The above is a illustration of a Prime Hindu Goddess called Durga riding on her favoured vehicle which can be a tiger or a lion (two cats).

Whats your take on the Freya,Durga and Celtic-Vedic connections?

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The above is a illustration of a Prime Hindu Goddess called Durga riding on her favoured vehicle which can be a tiger or a lion (two cats).

Whats your take on the Freya,Durga and Celtic-Vedic connections?

Man, you're fast, lol.

Well, I'd say it was one of Freya's cats, and knowing how the Nordics called Stonehenge, it seems plausible.

But I don't think it is very plausible people from India travelled all the way to England to carve out that cat.

If you mean the shared imagery has some meaning, I'd say no; Freya drove a carriage pulled by cats, Durga sat on one (or two). But sure, it could be true they were connected somehow.

Would that change what we know about the "Uffington Horse"?

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Man, you're fast, lol.

Well, I'd say it was one of Freya's cats, and knowing how the Nordics called Stonehenge, it seems plausible.

But I don't think it is very plausible people from India travelled all the way to England to carve out that cat.

If you mean the shared imagery has some meaning, I'd say no; Freya drove a carriage pulled by cats, Durga sat on one (or two). But sure, it could be true they were connected somehow.

Would that change what we know about the "Uffington Horse"?

Ofcourse Indians didn't go out all the way and carved the horse and returned to India.Was talking about cultural migrations and transfers.

"Uffigton Cat" you mean by your own suggestion,yes it would as the Celtic Druid culture and the Vedic culture share quite a lot so if this horse/unicorn is actually a cat it can help to draw more similes in a way that is suggested by my previous post.

And i think you are too quick to dismiss the shared imagery,both were using cats as a mode of transport (the illustration of Durga riding a tiger is not absolute,scriptures only suggest that the tiger/lion was her vehicle and could have been attached to a cart i.e 'Vahana')

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I also wanted to point out that it was actually VIKING invaders that Alfred fought of

correct .

also .the legend of the blowing stone exists . but so does the blowing stone itself

the word dragon was more recently replaced by the word dinosaur . dragons lingered on strained ever tapering branches until there was no more dra-un. for one man to kill a single dragon on his own was a great feat

Edited by whiteRider

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Ofcourse Indians didn't go out all the way and carved the horse and returned to India.Was talking about cultural migrations and transfers.

"Uffigton Cat" you mean by your own suggestion,yes it would as the Celtic Druid culture and the Vedic culture share quite a lot so if this horse/unicorn is actually a cat it can help to draw more similes in a way that is suggested by my previous post.

And i think you are too quick to dismiss the shared imagery,both were using cats as a mode of transport (the illustration of Durga riding a tiger is not absolute,scriptures only suggest that the tiger/lion was her vehicle and could have been attached to a cart i.e 'Vahana')

Not only Freya used a carriage pulled by cats, so did Cybele and Rhea:

Rhea only appears in Greek art from the 4th century BC, when her iconography draws on that of Cybele; the two are therefore often indistinguishable;[10] both can be shown on a throne flanked by lions or on a chariot drawn by two lions. In Roman religion, her counterpart Cybele was Magna Mater deorum Idaea, who was brought to Rome and was identified in Roman mythology as an ancestral Trojan deity. On a functional level, Rhea was thought equivalent to Roman Ops or Opis.

Most often Rhea's symbol is a pair of lions, the ones that pulled her celestial chariot and were seen often, rampant, one on either side of the gateways through the walls to many cities in the ancient world. The one at Mycenae is most characteristic, with the lions placed on either side of a pillar that symbolizes the goddess.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhea_%28mythology%29

Cybele play /ˈsɪbɨliː/ (Phrygian: Matar Kubileya/Kubeleya "Kubeleyan Mother", perhaps "Mountain Mother"; Lydian Kuvava; Greek: Κυβέλη Kybele, Κυβήβη Kybebe, Κύβελις Kybelis), was an originally Anatolian mother goddess. Little is known of her oldest Anatolian cults, other than her association with mountains, hawks and lions. She may have been Phrygia's State deity; her Phrygian cult was adopted and adapted by Greek colonists of Asia Minor, and spread from there to mainland Greece and its more distant western colonies from around the 6th century BCE.

In Greece, Cybele met with a mixed reception. She was partially assimilated to aspects of the Earth-goddess Gaia, her Minoan equivalent Rhea, and the Corn-Mother goddess Demeter. Some city-states, notably Athens, evoked her as a protector but her most celebrated Greek rites and processions show her as an essentially foreign, exotic mystery-goddess, who arrives in a lion-drawn chariot to the accompaniment of wild music, wine, and a disorderly, ecstatic following.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybele

I see much more resemblance between Freya and Rhea/Cybele than between Frey and Durga

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durga

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freyja

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Not only Freya used a carriage pulled by cats, so did Cybele and Rhea:

Rhea only appears in Greek art from the 4th century BC, when her iconography draws on that of Cybele; the two are therefore often indistinguishable;[10] both can be shown on a throne flanked by lions or on a chariot drawn by two lions. In Roman religion, her counterpart Cybele was Magna Mater deorum Idaea, who was brought to Rome and was identified in Roman mythology as an ancestral Trojan deity. On a functional level, Rhea was thought equivalent to Roman Ops or Opis.

Most often Rhea's symbol is a pair of lions, the ones that pulled her celestial chariot and were seen often, rampant, one on either side of the gateways through the walls to many cities in the ancient world. The one at Mycenae is most characteristic, with the lions placed on either side of a pillar that symbolizes the goddess.

http://en.wikipedia....hea_(mythology)

Cybele play /ˈsɪbɨliː/ (Phrygian: Matar Kubileya/Kubeleya "Kubeleyan Mother", perhaps "Mountain Mother"; Lydian Kuvava; Greek: Κυβέλη Kybele, Κυβήβη Kybebe, Κύβελις Kybelis), was an originally Anatolian mother goddess. Little is known of her oldest Anatolian cults, other than her association with mountains, hawks and lions. She may have been Phrygia's State deity; her Phrygian cult was adopted and adapted by Greek colonists of Asia Minor, and spread from there to mainland Greece and its more distant western colonies from around the 6th century BCE.

In Greece, Cybele met with a mixed reception. She was partially assimilated to aspects of the Earth-goddess Gaia, her Minoan equivalent Rhea, and the Corn-Mother goddess Demeter. Some city-states, notably Athens, evoked her as a protector but her most celebrated Greek rites and processions show her as an essentially foreign, exotic mystery-goddess, who arrives in a lion-drawn chariot to the accompaniment of wild music, wine, and a disorderly, ecstatic following.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybele

I see much more resemblance between Freya and Rhea/Cybele than between Frey and Durga

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durga

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freyja

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devi

This link will gives you a god descriptive of the Vedic godesses.There is a close parallel between Rhea and Kali(a form of Durga).

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