Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Sevastiel

Police: Mutilated Cow Found at Northland Farm

103 posts in this topic

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Police are investigating after a Northland farmer reported that one of his cows had been found dead and mutilated, apparently by someone who a veterinarian says knew what they were doing.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep. Had to be someone from another starsystem... :st

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“(It’s) just amazing how whoever does this terrible thing to animals seems to know what they are doing,” said Phillip. - from the article.

How is it amazing? Of course it was someone familiar with cow biology - any abbattoir worker, butcher or farmer would fall into that category. Or is it just random chance that all these perfectly cut steaks make it to millions of dinner tables all the time?

What is intriguing is that the article says:

- the cow was alive when it was mutilitated

- there was no blood

- the mutilation does not appear to be the cause of death :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I question this conclusion, if the mutilation took place post-mortum there would have been very little bleeding, consistent with what was seen. I wonder how it was determined that the mutilation took place while the animal was still alive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My own thoughts?

Cow was sick.

Not sure how insurance covers that, but freak accident is probably covered.

If you're a rancher, you probably learn a little something about caring for your own cattle to avoid the high costs of veterinary service.

Otherwise, sounds like media sensationalism.

Good share anyway though (I thought). Never know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure about ET's here but I did have an uncle who was arrested for cattle rustling in 1966 (true story)

He and some friend were a wee bit in their cups and decided to have a barbecue for the crowd at the bar. Problem was...no cow soooooo

Anyway - he never did THAT again. :innocent:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I question this conclusion, if the mutilation took place post-mortum there would have been very little bleeding, consistent with what was seen. I wonder how it was determined that the mutilation took place while the animal was still alive?

I agree totally..

If the cow was mutilated whilst still alive, there would be blood gushing out all over the place. Would be interesting to see how they came to the conclusion that the cow was still alive when mutilated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree totally..

If the cow was mutilated whilst still alive, there would be blood gushing out all over the place. Would be interesting to see how they came to the conclusion that the cow was still alive when mutilated.

I am just going out with a guess here, since I admittedly did not pay as much attention in school during the one session we had to disect a rat. But does not blood coagulate/dry up once the heart and lunges ceases to work? (Well at certain rate, not instantly) If it does, it would slow or halt the blood, in addition to no heartbeat to pump said blood.

But a thought came to me now of some local news I read 3-4 years ago. (Varnhem, located between Skövde and Skara in sweden for reference). There were some farmers who had issues with ravens, who would kill lambs and sheep to eat up the exposed organs, aswell as eyes and other soft tissue. It does add a bit more food for thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am just going out with a guess here, since I admittedly did not pay as much attention in school during the one session we had to disect a rat. But does not blood coagulate/dry up once the heart and lunges ceases to work? (Well at certain rate, not instantly) If it does, it would slow or halt the blood, in addition to no heartbeat to pump said blood.

But a thought came to me now of some local news I read 3-4 years ago. (Varnhem, located between Skövde and Skara in sweden for reference). There were some farmers who had issues with ravens, who would kill lambs and sheep to eat up the exposed organs, aswell as eyes and other soft tissue. It does add a bit more food for thought.

Blood coagulates mainly when exposed to air which is why it dries up and stops bleeding when you have a small cut. . This is due to 'platelets in the blood coming into direct contact with the air.' Unless it is a large cut like though a main vein or artery at which point it pumps out (due to the heart beating) at such a rate that the platelets are unable to coagulate fast enough to stop the bleeding. . If a body is cut once the heart stops beating, there will still be some bleeding but the blood will tend to seep out more slowly and at a steady rate, (no pumping effect)

Also, once the heart stops beating, the blood starts to sink due to gravity, to the lower extremeties of the body. If the body of the cow, for instance, is laying down and you start to cut at the top half (from ground level), there would be less blood than if you started at the bottom half.Obviously a lot would depend on how long the body had been dead. An extremely fresh body will still have a fair bit of blood oozing out as it takes a little time for the blood to sink to the lower section of the body.

In the cases of cattle mutikation, the animal is often found the next day, which is considered reasonably fresh. If the animal had been alive when mutilated, I would expect a fair bit of blood at the scene although a lot would depend on how and where the animal had been mutilated. I suppose an expert could do this without cutting a main artery but even so, there would be quite a bit of blood unless it was being mopped up as they went along.

I hope this answers your question :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Englishgent, thank you for that explenation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best I can come up with from my own experience is that the cow slipped her calfbed (uterus) and died, any scavengers would target the soft tissues of the exposed uterus and the udder although its hard to judge without seeing the wounds. If she went on her back the blood would have drained from the udder and if the uterus was removed close to the body the blood may have remained in the body cavity. Thinking back any cattle/sheep I have come across that have been partially scavenged leave little blood and the wounds can look quite professional.

It can be quite common for this to happen, especially if she had recently calfed although it can be easily corrected if caught.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best I can come up with from my own experience is that the cow slipped her calfbed (uterus) and died, any scavengers would target the soft tissues of the exposed uterus and the udder although its hard to judge without seeing the wounds. If she went on her back the blood would have drained from the udder and if the uterus was removed close to the body the blood may have remained in the body cavity. Thinking back any cattle/sheep I have come across that have been partially scavenged leave little blood and the wounds can look quite professional.

Excellent hypothesis. :tu:

I'm always amazed at how some people seem to be so willing to jump to outrageous and/or paranormal conclusions before ruling out more common rational explanations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so how do police know when a person is killed, that they we're mutilated before or after death. There"s something that tells them this. What I don't know. Like when a person is burned to death. They know if the person was dead or alive before the burning. With all the evidence they have, or don't have on this cow, I would look to the sky too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so how do police know when a person is killed, that they we're mutilated before or after death. There"s something that tells them this. What I don't know. Like when a person is burned to death. They know if the person was dead or alive before the burning. With all the evidence they have, or don't have on this cow, I would look to the sky too.

Well a vet isn't a forensic scientist and the cost of a post mortem would be more than the price of the animal. If a person was mutilated when alive there would be bloodloss, bruising etc, if burnt alive there would be smoke in the lungs etc. Its also easy to jump to conclusions, the work of a scavenger can look like that of a professional with a scalpal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok so how do police know when a person is killed, that they we're mutilated before or after death. There"s something that tells them this. What I don't know. Like when a person is burned to death. They know if the person was dead or alive before the burning. With all the evidence they have, or don't have on this cow, I would look to the sky too.

These things show up in a post mortem.

For instance, if a person is set alight whilst alive, there would be carbon deposits in the lungs and possible burning of soft tissue in the mouth throat and lungs because he would still be breathing and taking in the flames, smoke etc. A person who was dead prior to being set alight would not show these post mortem signs.

The cow's death is probably as explainable as most alleged cattle mutilations without having to look skywards :)

Edited by Englishgent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well a vet isn't a forensic scientist and the cost of a post mortem would be more than the price of the animal. If a person was mutilated when alive there would be bloodloss, bruising etc, if burnt alive there would be smoke in the lungs etc. Its also easy to jump to conclusions, the work of a scavenger can look like that of a professional with a scalpal.

Sorry Farmerboy. It would appear that we were both typing replies at the same time. I fully agree with what you have said :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My own thoughts?Cow was sick.Not sure how insurance covers that, but freak accident is probably covered.If you're a rancher, you probably learn a little something about caring for your own cattle to avoid the high costs of veterinary service.Otherwise, sounds like media sensationalism.Good share anyway though (I thought). Never know.

Farmers will often say you know your beat when you need the vet :lol: When we do give in we often steal ideas and techinques the vets use to avoid their services the next time unless it is an emergency as its on the small proceedures they make their money, my dad once got a bill for £30 for asking the vets opinion on an animal, nothing to do with treating it :hmm:

Excellent hypothesis. :tu: I'm always amazed at how some people seem to be so willing to jump to outrageous and/or paranormal conclusions before ruling out more common rational explanations.

Thanks :tu:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this is other animals doing this then someone please explain why it doesn't happen all the time ? Why isn't this a bigger story ? I mean taking taking the aliens out of it something is going on really strange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this is other animals doing this then someone please explain why it doesn't happen all the time ? Why isn't this a bigger story ? I mean taking taking the aliens out of it something is going on really strange.

It does happen all the time thats why its not a bigger story, just most farmers have the sense to know it was the crows, foxes and other scavengers which take advantage very quickly. Its easy for people to jump to conclusions if they have never encountered such a thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does happen all the time thats why its not a bigger story, just most farmers have the sense to know it was the crows, foxes and other scavengers which take advantage very quickly. Its easy for people to jump to conclusions if they have never encountered such a thing.

Your wrong! it doesn't happen all the time or Ranchers and Vets would not being going on tv to talk about it. Many times there is no foot prints I guess the animals are covering up their track so we wont suspect them. Also it was close to the guys home so you would think other animals would be making noise and freaking if scavengers were there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I expect many of you are not old enough to remember when cattle mutilations were a widespread mystery in the 1970s. Having been a dairy farmer at the time, I recall how many trade magazines were dedicated to stories of this phenomenon, which was never resolved to anyone's satisfaction. Farmers are pragmatic, and well acquainted with all possible explanations. Occurances may have diminished, but the mystery remains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your wrong! it doesn't happen all the time or Ranchers and Vets would not being going on tv to talk about it. Many times there is no foot prints I guess the animals are covering up their track so we wont suspect them. Also it was close to the guys home so you would think other animals would be making noise and freaking if scavengers were there.

I am a Farmer and I have experienced these things many times, and most of us just get on with it. Then you get the people who want to make aa big song and dance about it. In this case the animal was sick and isolated from the others, a standard practice. It also occured at night, the cattle would be either sleepingor lying down chewing their cud and wouldnt see much. Ive had to slip into fields at 4am and calve cows and the rest of the herd were none the wiser. Cattle dont freak out as easily as people think and unless the scavenger was a direct threat i dont feel that they would have made a ruckus.

As for footprints you have to take into consideration the terrain, not all substrates produce footprints depending on how hard or grassy the ground was and if there were any they can be easy to miss if you dont know what you are looking for.

A couple of years ago two akitas took down a deer on my land and you wouldnt have known they were there only for seeing them in the act. I went down the next day, no blood, no footprints and they were big dogs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is getting utterly insane !! Tip a cow and flip him ont a big sheet of poly drain the blood, for your witch craft party and outta there !

Simple right?

Well hold your horns pardner ! THose cows drink just like everyone ! It could of been an accident !

post-68971-0-24049000-1325967469_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was me.

I knew it. :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.