Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Child of Bast

New air battery proposed for electric cars

11 posts in this topic

IBM physicists are working on an air battery for electric cars which will help them outlast gas models.

ONE of the biggest drawbacks with owning an electric vehicle (EV) is range anxiety - a driver's nagging fear that the battery charge will not get them to their destination. Now IBM claims to have solved a fundamental problem that may lead to the creation of a battery with an 800-kilometre (500-mile) range - letting EVs potentially compete with most petrol engines for the first time.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nikola Tesla successfully used zinc air batteries in the late 1800s to power electric cars. That technology was far simpler and much safer. I wonder why nobody is pursuing zinc air technology?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem is not just one of range though. I mean, how long does it take to re-fuel with good old petroleum,10 minutes tops? To recharge electric vehicles takes hours. This is the biggest fundamental problem with electric vehicles. The 100 or so miles range they have now would be adequate, if re-fuelling and charging times were any where near comparable.

Although 500 miles would allow many more people to consider electric vehicles viable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From http://www.sbir.gov/sbirsearch/detail/120642

An even more promising technology looms.....

High energy density battery will be developed by combining metallic sodium anode with an air cathode. The proposed sodium-air battery is expected to dominate the performance of lithium-air battery. This battery technology is based on sodium conducting solid-electrolyte developed at Ceramatec Inc. The sodium conducting solid-electrolyte has conductivity in the range of 10-2 S/cm at ambient temperature and is expected to be chemically stable when in contact with sodium metal. The proposed electrolyte can be fabricated into a thin structure, which will significantly enhance the gravimetric and volumetric energy and power density characteristics of sodium-air batteries. The proposed batteries can potentially deliver energy densities exceeding 500 Wh/kg and cell voltages of 2.5 - 3.0 V with potentially high rate capability, charge retention, and shelf life characteristics required for military applications

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Blueandi, I just don't see that as an issue. if you charge your car every night, like a smartphone, then you wouldn't really ever run out, assuming the range is increased. Which to me, means range is the ONLY real issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks For The Power Source Info !

Now Locating All Those Electric Motors That Would Have Been Used In The Chrysler Town & Country Postal Mini-Vans is the Question ? I Hear They Are Already Using 250 HP Motors in EV Buses in LA, Toronto & Long Island already !

From http://www.sbir.gov/...h/detail/120642

An even more promising technology looms.....

High energy density battery will be developed by combining metallic sodium anode with an air cathode. The proposed sodium-air battery is expected to dominate the performance of lithium-air battery. This battery technology is based on sodium conducting solid-electrolyte developed at Ceramatec Inc. The sodium conducting solid-electrolyte has conductivity in the range of 10-2 S/cm at ambient temperature and is expected to be chemically stable when in contact with sodium metal. The proposed electrolyte can be fabricated into a thin structure, which will significantly enhance the gravimetric and volumetric energy and power density characteristics of sodium-air batteries. The proposed batteries can potentially deliver energy densities exceeding 500 Wh/kg and cell voltages of 2.5 - 3.0 V with potentially high rate capability, charge retention, and shelf life characteristics required for military applications

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Company in Utah (Technology Holding, LLC) Has Been Working Many Years On Advanced Battery Technology, etc !

Thanks For The Power Source Info !

Now Locating All Those Electric Motors That Would Have Been Used In The Chrysler Town & Country Postal Mini-Vans is the Question ? I Hear They Are Already Using 250 HP Motors in EV Buses in LA, Toronto & Long Island already !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nikola Tesla successfully used zinc air batteries in the late 1800s to power electric cars. That technology was far simpler and much safer. I wonder why nobody is pursuing zinc air technology?

I think originally it wasn't made because it was common belief that the gas engine would be cheaper and easier to make. As time went on, the auto industry became stuck with the gas engine and then dependant of gas. Making it harder and harder to switch til it got to the point that oil companies and auto companies were in bed together. Now, the oil companies won't allow the auto makers to change for loss of their main sorce of profits.

It's too bad that Tesla didn't go farther with his invention and create a company that manufatured his idea. Would have change the course of humankind for the better imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Blueandi, I just don't see that as an issue. if you charge your car every night, like a smartphone, then you wouldn't really ever run out, assuming the range is increased. Which to me, means range is the ONLY real issue.

Ok. So I need to drive 200 miles, my vehicle holds enough fuel to do, say 110 (not realistic I know;but just as an example), so after 90 miles give or take, I find a petrol station. 10 minutes later I can drive the remainder of my journey. 3 and a half hours roughly at motorway speeds, no problem.

In an electric car, that has a range of 110 miles, to drive the same distance would take an extra 5 hours or so, because of the length of time it takes to recharge (imagine waiting at a service station for 5 hours or more just to re-fuel). As I said, a higher RANGE would certainly go some way to alleviating the problem for many users, but not entirely negate the issue of charging. I can use my infernal combustion engined car any time, without having to wait for hours. Higher range batteries can not completely solve this issue with electric vehicles.

1)When Your smartphone goes dead, it doesn't leave you stranded at the side of the motorway.

2)You do not have to plan in advance when to use your car.

3)You can drive as far or for as long as you like.

4)You live on the tenth floor: You'd need an awfully long extension lead.

etc.etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you check out Tesla and cars on the net you might find the story

with an iron pipe antenna for the power drive in Canada.

Researcher William R. Lyne noted the K Capture of iron to be around

7KV and set out to see what happened. A flame developed which he says

is Nitrogen burning. Did Tesla develop a steam turbine car or perhaps

all electric in some way. Tesla did say he could burn Nitrogen with

his pulsing electrostatic electricity. That statement was on fliers

for his Long Island Tower. Burning air as fuel has never been done

and perhaps the least of the many free energy devices Tesla made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah well, the process of photosynthesis is far from their grasps yet they will invent something in order to keep you in theirs while touting a green design. How lovely. Get back to me in my next life when others have actually accomplished that fact.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.