Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Transform

Why Dinosaurs Extinct

42 posts in this topic

idea.gif

Why Dinasaurs Extinct. wacko.gif Remember the Virus "SAR"Attacking human beings and now the Bird Flu. Dinosaurs may be extinct by some Virus just like "SAR" or by some virus like Bird Flu.Just look at Bird Flu for example:The Bird Flu attack those birds animals.They are then being eaten by us or other animals.So this virus continue to kill those animals feed on one another.Animals from the sea come up to the land and feed on those animals attack by this virus and bring them into the sea creatures.So in the end all die.So they are extinct in the end.Whereas for human beings,we are intelligent to know these types of virus will destroy our human race and other animals life.We destroy these affected animals to prevent it spread to kills all animals who feed on them.So we did not extinct until now.

Dinosaurs are not so intelligent then humans beings so when Virus attack they all die.

abduct.gifclap.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting theory, and possible. The fossil record, though, asides from the extinction events that have already been correlated to environmental disasters, shows the final extinction to have taken several thousands of years to come about. I would think that a virus virulent enough to affect all the dinosaurs would act a bit faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My guess would be a climate change over time Dinosaurs were cold blooded therefore a drastic climate change would have a serious impact on them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have only a moment, but would like to say first, I know almost nothing

about the great age of reptiles, except that they lived for a very, very

long time. I can only imagine that during that time, and prior to that

era, many species went extinct, and afterwards, many others, as well.

They certainly had their fare share of time! But I would guess that the most

difficult to kill off are the simple bacteria. They are found at volcanic

vents, very deep in the ocean. They live off a strange mixture of chemicals,

without even needing sunlight energy. Perhaps the early planet was dark,

with many long eons of cloudy days, and only bacteria could survive,

and so some of them live on- and have existed longer than anything else!

And, I was reading about our Galaxy and stars; and how stars come and go.

Sometimes they just fade like old soldiers.

Sometimes they go out in glory- supernovae.

I read that ten million years ago, there were some supernovae that happened,

which did unleash energy our way. Those events carried a lot of iron nuclei,

the kind found in old stars, in their core, but not found on Earth from any

typical terrestrial chemistry reactions.

The blast waves sent (?) high energy cosmic particles, x-rays and gamma rays.

They killed off some organisms- simple plant and bacteria life in the oceans

and lakes. Or at least, a lot was affected adversely, they speculate.

Could it have hurt dinosaurs, if during their era, some cosmic energy

or astroid affected them, weakened them, change their environment...?

I once read how wooly mammoths suvived for an additional time,

even though they were caught up in climate change. The planet was

warming, and they had heavy fur coats. Those that lived the longest,

those groups moved north. They moved until they just died out from

the heat and stress, and man hunting them down, too.

The last skeletal remains were found in Canada, in a strata that

showed many plant forms particular to tropical climate, the kind that

happened as the Ice Age was receading from the lower latitudes.

Perhaps like the others here stated, climate and environment were

a big part of it. The only different thing that I want to say is that

I was reading some information on ice core studies, recently.

There was a young, but respected, graduate student who was called to

the White House, along with a few others, to discuss climate matters.

The Vice-President was interested in the work the grad student had

done, because he had some 'evidence' that in the past, climate shifts

have sometimes occured in very short time frames.

Changes of a significant kind, that could put severe pressure on

weather patterns, and some plant and animal populations.

The idea was not held in any serious regard until his ice core studies.

Edited by radio_flux

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the dinosaurs left our planet on great space craft. This was after they evolved into bipedal beings and learned the ways of sciene . They now groove in the andromeda galaxy with the Space lobsters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My guess would be a climate change over time Dinosaurs were cold blooded therefore a drastic climate change would have a serious impact on them.

266121[/snapback]

Are you sure about that? Reptiles are cold blooded but dinosaurs were warm blooded. Dinosaur bones were hollow like birds, and reptile bones are solid. Even though dinosaurs were neither bird or reptile, they were also related to both at some point.

Interesting that a disease wiped them out. I always looked at it this way: Climate change at first, then changes in mammals, then a disease and survivors were a few dinosaur species that later evolved again and died out. I wouldn't be surprised if some dinosaurs remained alive when human beings walked the earth.

Edited by NightMoon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i always thought it was a meteor that wiped out the dinosaurs, it hit the earth led to climate change, blocked out the sun and so on....

i'm not expert though, so i don't really know rolleyes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

likely people will still be aguing over this until we go extict, and then billions years later sentient squids will wonder how we dispaeared wink2.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you sure about that? Reptiles are cold blooded but dinosaurs were warm blooded. Dinosaur bones were hollow like birds, and reptile bones are solid. Even though dinosaurs were neither bird or reptile, they were also related to both at some point.

Actually dinosaurs were (a sub-group of) reptiles, of which a strand evolved into the bird family. tongue.gif

And indeed, most palaeontologists are convinced they were warm-blooded. thumbsup.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wouldn't be surprised if some dinosaurs remained alive when human beings walked the earth.

Actually, I remember hearing something within the last year that scientists discovered human bones within the same area as dino bones... or something like that. Can anyone else validate this? That would have been scary as hell trying to live with school bus size creatures casually strolling around in your yard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aqua, my anthropology teacher who was a archaeologist talk about that other day, he say that to untrainned eyes it seems like as if they die at same time. But when they bring in a Geogologist they immidately point out many large flaws and easily confirmed that they both exist at different time and that the bones somehow get down there. If you want I can email him and ask where he got this info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dinosaurs didnt ALL extinct. what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?! of course they are dinosaurs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dinosaurs didnt ALL extinct. what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?! of course they are dinosaurs

267829[/snapback]

We don't know if they exist, s we can't say that they count as example

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?!

plesiosors are not dinosaurs

and mokele mbembe has yet to be proven to be a dinosaur

Edited by Talon S.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not why dinosaurs exstinct but are dinosaurs exstinct?

thats my reply.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dinosaurs didnt ALL extinct. what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?! of course they are dinosaurs

267829[/snapback]

Hiya,

Im a newbie. Gotto love me wub.gif

Were plesiosaurs carnivorous? Could they eat a human?

sad.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

didnt they teach you anything in school lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps we are missing the most important question in all of this. I am not sure what that question is but perhaps we are missing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dinosaurs didnt ALL extinct. what are plesiosors that live in the loch ness and other lakes? what is the mokele mbembe? not a dinosaur?! of course they are dinosaurs

267829[/snapback]

Hiya,

Im a newbie. Gotto love me wub.gif

Were plesiosaurs carnivorous? Could they eat a human?

sad.gif

270050[/snapback]

...uhhhh yeah your a newbie......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting! I like your idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Plesiosaurs ARE the lochness! Never knew anyone else except me would think that too!- And I think some other dinosaurs survived too! Like one of those flying ones when ppl long time ago thought they were dragons and killed all of them!

Edited by cutycub

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting theory, the volcanic activity was high in that time, and caused atmospheric changes which damaged the dinosaurs, and the virus would cause them to die faster, then an asteroid strikes the earth.

dinosaurs wouldn't survive that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I seriously doubt there are any Plesiosaurs in Loch Ness, not unless they've acquired the ability to breath underwater and survive being entombed in ice for thousands of years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

no no no saruman...only around 8000 thousand years that the earth exists. seriously i am christian and i think the earth is around 8000 years old so it looks weird when people talk about millions of years. but its ok i respect that. why wouldnt plesiosaurs have survived?! sometimes they go over water to breath and thats when we see them. thats what i think

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.