Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2
Still Waters

Brown Mountain Lights remain a mystery

34 posts in this topic

Not really much of a mystery at all:

http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4226

So let's wrap up what we've learned about the two different manifestations of the Brown Mountain Lights. Regarding those that appear in the sky above a ridge, it's apparent that the 1922 USGS report solved it as described in the following conclusion. Today, nearly 90 years later, the lights are coming from different sources but this analysis probably still holds up:

"In summary it may be said that the Brown Mountain lights are clearly not of unusual nature or origin. About 47 percent of the lights that the writer was able to study instrumentally were due to automobile headlights, 33 percent to locomotive headlights, 10 percent to stationary lights, and 10 percent to brush fires."

As for the lights appearing on the faces of the hills, we find there are no historical references to such a thing, and only a few recent YouTube videos and modern claims reporting it, in this age of LED flashlights, lanterns, headlamps, and iPhone screens. So I'm confident calling this one unexplained, but also not especially interesting or surprising.

It is all too often that we eagerly accept wild and sensational phenomena, which causes us to shut out the real science behind what's going on. I find real wonder in mirage refractions, and I find great excitement in such perfect solutions as the correlation of the locomotive with the 1909 Lights reports. This wonder and excitement are lost to those who replace science with sensationalism.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really much of a mystery at all:

http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4226

So let's wrap up what we've learned about the two different manifestations of the Brown Mountain Lights. Regarding those that appear in the sky above a ridge, it's apparent that the 1922 USGS report solved it as described in the following conclusion. Today, nearly 90 years later, the lights are coming from different sources but this analysis probably still holds up:

"In summary it may be said that the Brown Mountain lights are clearly not of unusual nature or origin. About 47 percent of the lights that the writer was able to study instrumentally were due to automobile headlights, 33 percent to locomotive headlights, 10 percent to stationary lights, and 10 percent to brush fires."

As for the lights appearing on the faces of the hills, we find there are no historical references to such a thing, and only a few recent YouTube videos and modern claims reporting it, in this age of LED flashlights, lanterns, headlamps, and iPhone screens. So I'm confident calling this one unexplained, but also not especially interesting or surprising.

It is all too often that we eagerly accept wild and sensational phenomena, which causes us to shut out the real science behind what's going on. I find real wonder in mirage refractions, and I find great excitement in such perfect solutions as the correlation of the locomotive with the 1909 Lights reports. This wonder and excitement are lost to those who replace science with sensationalism.

I think you know how I look and feel about things......The Brown Mountain lights ( at least the ones on the video I posted ) are not LED's, Automoblies, or trains......Spirits?...No.

The footage I posted is a short, from a team that went there to study them, and National Geographic went also.They had several teams in several areas, all communicating.In Norway,

the same type of thing happens, and as from what i have read, they are studied by a University, and no answers so far....It is un-explained as far as I am concerned, and I would love to be able to see them.

The Norway lights look and act the same, have the same type of terrain, etc.....I think they are the same thing, and hope they find a answer when I can still see to read it.

More on whom is investigating, there are also US Universities that go there to research this.....I kind of wonder why the Brown Mountain lights do not get this funding?

Later, the EMBLA program was initiated. It brings together established scientists and students into researching these lights. Leading research institutions are Østfold University College (Norway) and the Italian National Research Council.
Hessdalen is a small valley in the central part of Norway. At the end of 1981 through 1984, residents of the Valley became concerned and alarmed about strange, unexplained lights that appeared at many locations throughout the Valley. Hundreds of lights were observed. At the peak of activity there were about 20 reports a week. Project Hessdalen was established in the summer of 1983. A field investigation was carried out between 21.January and 26.February 1984. Fifty-three light observations were made during the field investigation. You may read the details in the technical report. There was an additional field investigation in the winter of 1985. However, no phenomena were seen during the period when the instruments were present.

Lights are still being observed in the Hessdalen Valley, but their frequency has decreased to about 20 observations a year. An automatic measurement station was put up in Hessdalen in August 1998. Both data and alarm-pictures can be viewed on this website.

for above : Project Hessdalen is a project at Østfold University College

http://www.hessdalen.org/index_e.shtml

H-a5-middle.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you know how I look and feel about things......The Brown Mountain lights ( at least the ones on the video I posted ) are not LED's, Automoblies, or trains......Spirits?...No.

The footage I posted is a short, from a team that went there to study them, and National Geographic went also.They had several teams in several areas, all communicating.In Norway,

the same type of thing happens, and as from what i have read, they are studied by a University, and no answers so far....It is un-explained as far as I am concerned, and I would love to be able to see them.

The Norway lights look and act the same, have the same type of terrain, etc.....I think they are the same thing, and hope they find a answer when I can still see to read it.

More on whom is investigating, there are also US Universities that go there to research this.....I kind of wonder why the Brown Mountain lights do not get this funding?

for above : Project Hessdalen is a project at Østfold University College

http://www.hessdalen.org/index_e.shtml

H-a5-middle.jpg

Ah, Hessdelan, Brian Dunning has covered that one as well:

http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4270

All of these lights seem to be explainable by a handful of phenomenon and Norway is no different, with quite a large percentage of misidentified aircraft lights thrown in as well.

Edited by Rafterman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, Hessdelan, Brian Dunning has covered that one as well:

http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4270

All of these lights seem to be explainable by a handful of phenomenon and Norway is no different, with quite a large percentage of misidentified aircraft lights thrown in as well.

You are only sourcing the skeptoid....And his opinions.....I would not, and can not consider that fact.

As I stated before, none of these have yet been determined as to what causes them.....Opinions yes, but nothing else.

As I said, colleges and Universities are studying the ones in Norway....I guess they do not read the skeptoid?

Edited by Sakari

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was lucky enough to have seen the lights at about 6:45 in the morning when headed to work one morning. I lived on the opposite side of Brown Mountain from where the lights are usually reported. The sun was already on the mountain but the light was much brighter and more brilliant than the sun's light. Most locals don't ever get to see it, so I feel very privileged to have witnessed these legendary lights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was lucky enough to have seen the lights at about 6:45 in the morning when headed to work one morning. I lived on the opposite side of Brown Mountain from where the lights are usually reported. The sun was already on the mountain but the light was much brighter and more brilliant than the sun's light. Most locals don't ever get to see it, so I feel very privileged to have witnessed these legendary lights.

:tu:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We saw the lights although not on the first night we looked. I live two counties away from Burke county, where the lights occur. We traveled to Burke to visit family and a group of us went up to the Brown Mountain Overlook which is the best place to view the lights. They are best seen between 10 PM and 2 AM. Our first attempt at viewing them was unsuccessful and we saw nothing. The second night, we went around 12 AM and saw quite a display of the lights. They can be rare and weather conditions are a large factor in the viewability of the lights but they do happen moderately often.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Why the hell hasn't anyone filmed this through a high-powered telescope?

Or maybe they have and I just haven't seen it yet.

Edited by pallidin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Such a simple explanation guys, no mystery here:

30.gif

Coincidentally, that's how the mountain got its' name.

Edit: Note how his facial expression changes.

Edited by Timonthy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.