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A rather obscure Bassoon

32,000-Year-Old Plant Resurrected

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Researchers in Russia have revived a fertile plant from the remains of 32,000-year-old fruit that was found buried within the fossilized burrows of ancient squirrels deep in the Siberian ice.

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I read this earlier on a news site. Pretty awesome they were able to do that and it produces pretty flowers. :)

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I read this earlier on a news site. Pretty awesome they were able to do that and it produces pretty flowers. :)

These are amazing times we live in,keep your Ancient Aliens,we Humans are more than capable of doing wonderous things ourselves.

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These are amazing times we live in,keep your Ancient Aliens,we Humans are more than capable of doing wonderous things ourselves.

Well said sir, well said indeed!

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Sounds kinda dangerous.

What if the plant produces toxins or something that is potentially lethal to humans because we havnt built up an immunity to it.

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Sounds kinda dangerous.

What if the plant produces toxins or something that is potentially lethal to humans because we havnt built up an immunity to it.

You're right, there is a chance of allergic reaction.

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Mmmmmm 32,000-year-old slushie!!! I just want to know what the flavour will be called, and if it tastes any good!!

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For £6k I'll test it!

I'd do anything for £6k right now, genuinely anything!!

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For £6k I'll test it!

I'd do anything for £6k right now, genuinely anything!!

Nice to know, I'll let you know if I need to get rid of that annoying guy I work with who talks about his push-bike all day long.

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In the news today, Russians are still fighting to control an outbreak caused by what is now been named the Armageddon Flower, a prehistoric plant brought to life in a lab just 2 years ago.

Once the plant took hold it literally multiplied at astronomical rates attacking competing plants with a toxin that is produced in it's roots and saturates the soil as it spreads.

It is said that 40% of all other vegetation in Russia and parts of the Ukraine have now been desroyed and or infected with the toxin.

In a rare display, Moscow has reached out for help to stop the spread of the invader that was once deemed a historic success.

Russia has been put in literal lock-down as other countries are deeply concerned about the world crop/food supplies should this killer flower spread it's seed to other continents.

The only saving grace, winter is just a month away. That's when the plant goes dormant and allows for a few months to develop something to fight the onslaught.

Some reports have said that it's already too late though as unconfirmed reports claim sightings of growth in Afghanistan and China.

Computer models show the Armageddon Flower consuming all vegetation on the planet within 8 to 10 years.

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Researchers in Russia have revived a fertile plant from the remains of 32,000-year-old fruit that was found buried within the fossilized burrows of ancient squirrels deep in the Siberian ice.

Imagine that B)

I was about to post this topic. You beat me to it :tu:

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Sounds kinda dangerous.

What if the plant produces toxins or something that is potentially lethal to humans because we havnt built up an immunity to it.

I'm sure that's something the scientists took into account. I imagine this plant is being cared for in a controlled environment.

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Was this an extinct plant? Or does a modern variety already exist? The article didn't say...

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In the news today, Russians are still fighting to control an outbreak caused by what is now been named the Armageddon Flower, a prehistoric plant brought to life in a lab just 2 years ago.

Once the plant took hold it literally multiplied at astronomical rates attacking competing plants with a toxin that is produced in it's roots and saturates the soil as it spreads.

It is said that 40% of all other vegetation in Russia and parts of the Ukraine have now been desroyed and or infected with the toxin.

In a rare display, Moscow has reached out for help to stop the spread of the invader that was once deemed a historic success.

Russia has been put in literal lock-down as other countries are deeply concerned about the world crop/food supplies should this killer flower spread it's seed to other continents.

The only saving grace, winter is just a month away. That's when the plant goes dormant and allows for a few months to develop something to fight the onslaught.

Some reports have said that it's already too late though as unconfirmed reports claim sightings of growth in Afghanistan and China.

Computer models show the Armageddon Flower consuming all vegetation on the planet within 8 to 10 years.

:tu:

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This is so awesome, this fruit may be harmful or actually really good for humans, perhaps it has some sort of healing power or health revitalizing ingredients! I want one for sure!

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This is so awesome, this fruit may be harmful or actually really good for humans, perhaps it has some sort of healing power or health revitalizing ingredients! I want one for sure!

I agree there may be risks involved but as you say we could find new plants with potential medical benefits,as long as we control this then i am all for this..

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Awesome.

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whats the scientific name of the flower?

Edited by ~C.S.M~

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whats the scientific name of the flower?

Silene stenophylla.

Taun - Yes, the species is still alive and well in its indigenous region. Other species of the genus, such as the bladder campion are quite common in North America.

.

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Sounds kinda dangerous.

What if the plant produces toxins or something that is potentially lethal to humans because we havnt built up an immunity to it.

30,000 years is not long in biological time, this is not some plant from the Jurassic Period or from off world. Very likely it's just a pretty novelty.

Most plant toxins that can affect humans are poisons, a few are venoms. I don't know the genus and species of the flower in question, but any good taxonomist should be able to place it in a family. Assuming its ancestors are still around they can narrow it down even further. Once they determine the family they have some knowledge of the potential for toxins. In some plant families few or no toxins are known. In others some are toxic and some are not. Take the Anacardiaceae, this contains some well known poisonous plants; Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, some plants that can cause allergic reactions in sensitive people like the Brazilian Pepper but also edible plants like Cashews and Mangos, both of which can cause skin irritation in sensitive people.

But very likely this particular plant is harmless, or only toxic if ingested. Many southern U.S. cities grow Nerium oleander, an extremely poisonous shrub with beautiful flowers, but unless it is eaten that is not a problem. There are a few plants that inject venom, such as Stinging Nettle, but again, once the taxonomists know the plant family they should have an idea about what they are dealing with.

We already have ancient seeds that have been germinated to produce plants; Nelumbo (lotus) seeds have been found in the tombs of the Pharaohs some 2000+ years old and were still viable. A recent Magnolia sp. seed was found in a peat bog and was grown to maturity after being buried for perhaps thousands of years. It differed from a modern Magnolia of the same species in having some extra flower petals. These ancient plants are probably being propagated as we speak and will one day no doubt show up in garden catalogs.

Most seeds are self-contained DNA receptacles of their parent species (or of a hybrid), they probably do not contain viruses, and any virus would be a plant pathogen, not a human one. While we don't want some ancient virus running amok in our wheat fields, this is not a very like threat, since this plant is not related to wheat which is a grass.

I would worry more about some of the genetically engineered plants that are becoming part of our diet rather than this little flower.

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I find this plant and the ability to recreate it so incredibly fascinating.

What a beautiful little flower!

And I am sure this is making Monsanto, now owners of the highly questionable Blackwater, Inc, have massive poop-purges. LOL!!!

( could not say s--t fits and hope to have it remain as a comment).

Edited by regeneratia

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I would worry more about some of the genetically engineered plants that are becoming part of our diet rather than this little flower.

Me too. That is why this event is associated with Monsanto in my mind at this point in time.

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Me too. That is why this event is associated with Monsanto in my mind at this point in time.

It was a terrible precedent when the courts allowed the patenting of living organisms. Companies are now in a race to see who can patent living organisms in the hope that some may produce huge future profits in pharmaceuticals.

Personally I would not have a problem with plant patents on hybrid ornamental plants, like a rose or an orchid, AS LONG AS the plant was not being used for human consumption like rose hips (rose) or Vanilla (orchid). If a breeder makes a new variety of plant and then wants to distribute some new Hibiscus for the nursery trade, then it is probably fair compensation for the time and talent in giving the breeder the exclusive right to bring it to market via a plant patent. However, it should be illegal to patent anything that is or could be used as a food source for humans (and perhaps as animal food as well). This puts too much power into the hands of corporations. You can control whole populations, even counties, wipe out years of heirloom seeds that are suited to a particular area and force farmers to buy genetically modified seed stock. Imagine if all the corn is the world is replaces with some high yield genetically modified variety that can grow on poor soils with little water. Great you say! However, think Irish Potato Famine, where nearly all the potatoes in Ireland were one variety and they were decimated by a fungus resulting in mass starvation. This is the risk of monoculture and the larger the monoculture, the greater the risk to the food supply should things go wrong. There is an hour long YouTube video on Monsanto and how they have sued farmers when their seed (which has genetic markers) shows up in a farmer's field. You can probably cross reference this on Google if it hasn't been pulled.

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Impressive. After some tests they may find it holds some medical properties too :)

Edited by Kryso

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