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Child of Bast

Fossils show huge penguin once roamed N.Z.

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Fossilised remains of one of the largest penguins ever, an "elegant" giant standing 1.3 metres (52 inches) tall, have been found in New Zealand, scientists said Tuesday.The penguin lived 27-24 million years ago, when New Zealand was mostly underwater and consisted of isolated, rocky outcrops that offered protection from predators and plentiful food supplies, researchers said.The first traces of the penguin, dubbed Kairuku -- Maori for diver who returns with food -- were found embedded in a cliff at Waimate in the South Island by University of Otago paleontologist professor Ewen Fordyce in 1977.arrow3.gifRead more...

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I was depressed to see there was no picture of the actual fossil. Good story, though!

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That is one big penguin. :geek:

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It must have been amazing to see flocks of huge penguins flying around!

A bit like this....

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I was depressed to see there was no picture of the actual fossil. Good story, though!

Same here. I imagined a huge, Danny DeVito-like fossil but no joy. Really good find though.

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They are only marginally bigger than todays Emperor Penguin which stands at 122 cm (or 48 inches). This fellow just leaned over him at 130cm (or 52 inches).

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I'd just like to point out that a creature such as described here shows many of the criteria believed to be necessary to achieve 'Secondary Intelligence' as a species...

Some background, 'Primary Intelligence' is defined as the basic brainpower required for survival. All species on Earth display primary intelligence. 'Secondary Intelligence' on the other hand, shows cognitive reasoning skills, and advanced conceptual abilities. A creature with Secondary Intelligence could perform a thought experiment, and could design a tool.

Many species on Earth today exhibit secondary intelligence, for example some (non-human) primate species use sticks as tools to 'fish' for ants within trees.

Usually for Secondary Intelligence to be achieved within a species, I've noticed (this is just my personal criteria here...) the following characteristics are either present, or most of them are present in the species:

1) Upright Walking (enabling the development of a larger brain)

2) Binocular Vision (enabling 3D visual perception)

3) Manipulatable Digits (humans have fingers, octopi have arms, etc.)

4) Sufficient Body Mass to support a Large Brain

5) Carnivorous Tendencies (which encourage a 'hunter' mentality, which many scientists believe develops higher brain function for a time during species development)

Not sure on whether or not penguins have binocular vision... (eyes in the front or eyes on the side...) It would seem that side vision would serve them well underwater...

But other than that, the data (in my view) suggests a species here with Secondary Intelligence, now extinct on our Earth. We could have communicated with a creature like that, had it survived. In fact, with 24 million years on us, this Bird could have taught us some things...

-Brand

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cool! But yes only slightly bigger than an Emperor.

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Penguins don't fly acute alan. Sorry. It would nice though. Imagine a flock of penguins and pigs flying together. Magnificent

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Penguins don't fly acute alan. Sorry. It would nice though. Imagine a flock of penguins and pigs flying together. Magnificent

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that's one very big penguin

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I'd just like to point out that a creature such as described here shows many of the criteria believed to be necessary to achieve 'Secondary Intelligence' as a species...

Some background, 'Primary Intelligence' is defined as the basic brainpower required for survival. All species on Earth display primary intelligence. 'Secondary Intelligence' on the other hand, shows cognitive reasoning skills, and advanced conceptual abilities. A creature with Secondary Intelligence could perform a thought experiment, and could design a tool.

Many species on Earth today exhibit secondary intelligence, for example some (non-human) primate species use sticks as tools to 'fish' for ants within trees.

Usually for Secondary Intelligence to be achieved within a species, I've noticed (this is just my personal criteria here...) the following characteristics are either present, or most of them are present in the species:

1) Upright Walking (enabling the development of a larger brain)

2) Binocular Vision (enabling 3D visual perception)

3) Manipulatable Digits (humans have fingers, octopi have arms, etc.)

4) Sufficient Body Mass to support a Large Brain

5) Carnivorous Tendencies (which encourage a 'hunter' mentality, which many scientists believe develops higher brain function for a time during species development)

Not sure on whether or not penguins have binocular vision... (eyes in the front or eyes on the side...) It would seem that side vision would serve them well underwater...

But other than that, the data (in my view) suggests a species here with Secondary Intelligence, now extinct on our Earth. We could have communicated with a creature like that, had it survived. In fact, with 24 million years on us, this Bird could have taught us some things...

-Brand

Hi Brand.

You might be interested in the study on corvid intelligence: there are biologists who put their intelligence inbetween humans and apes.

And about point -1- : upright walking? What about dolphins, killer whales and whales in general? Their brains are equal in size to ours.

Point -5- Carnivorous Tendencies. Personally I think it's opportunists that have more possibilities. Think about this: no prey to hunt, what do you do? You eat roots, eggs, fruit, herbs. What do you do when you are a strict carnivore and your prey had left the area you live in? You starve.

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imagine all the extinct animals are still around..

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Penguins don't fly acute alan. Sorry. It would nice though. Imagine a flock of penguins and pigs flying together. Magnificent

Depends how hard I throw them, and what you would consider flying... :w00t:

As for the video, it's pretty sad how gullible people can be (although I don't think acute alan was posting this seriously).

And as for the OP - I don't think 'huge' is the correct word :(

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It would be awesome to have that big of a panguin... Unless it eats people...

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They are only marginally bigger than todays Emperor Penguin which stands at 122 cm (or 48 inches). This fellow just leaned over him at 130cm (or 52 inches).

I was thinking the same thing.I would bet a few Emperors have reached 52".

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