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Leonardo

[Updated] Do We Have the Right to be Killed?

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Tony Nicklinson, who is paralysed and wants a doctor to be able to lawfully end his life, should be allowed to proceed with his "right-to-die" case, a High Court judge has ruled.

The 58-year-old from Melksham, Wiltshire, has "locked-in syndrome" following a stroke in 2005 and is unable to carry out his own suicide.

His is seeking legal protection for any doctor who helps him end his life.

The Ministry of Justice argues making such a ruling would change murder laws.

"Locked-in syndrome" leaves people with paralysed bodies but fully-functioning minds.

The judge's ruling now means that Mr Nicklinson's case will go to a full hearing, where medical evidence can be heard.

source

This is a very difficult situation. On the one hand I cannot imagine the torture Mr Nicklinson suffers through being 'locked-in'. Life like that would be unbearable for me.

However, as the article goes on to suggest, what Mr Nicklinson is requesting is not to be allowed to have a doctor assist his suicide, he wants a doctor to actually kill him.

It is a terrible dilemma, and I know such topics raise strong feelings, but I would ask that responders be thoughtful and considerate about any reply.

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I would say yes, but first you have to examine their mental state to see if everything's good and "normal", which is very difficult to do. Many people, when they experience terrible hardship, feel like they'd prefer to die. But often they overcome that hardship and have happy lives and realize how wrong they were to want to die. I don't think that most people experiencing hardship are completely mentally OK, so I wouldn't support this "voluntary death" thing.

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If I were in intractable pain with no hope of recovery then I would like the option of being able to end the suffering. We do this for our pets...

The problem of course is the abuse of such a system. And, like anything human, it would be abused.

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I think if you are sound of mind then you should be able to have the option.Steps should be put in place to make sure that the person requesting the...procedure i suppose...is not going to have any quality of life if they remain in the same condition.I watched my father die from renal failure brought on by diabetes and im sure if he had been given the option then he may have chosen it....and i would of understood his choice....we must not be selfish to keep them alive just for our own benefit....it isn't fair to the patient or the family but more so the patient

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If I were in intractable pain with no hope of recovery then I would like the option of being able to end the suffering. We do this for our pets...

The problem of course is the abuse of such a system. And, like anything human, it would be abused.

Yeah i agree, unscrupulous family members lining up to have their parents or grandparents removed so they can get their hands on their cash or property.The whole thing could degenerate in years to come.A bit like Logan's run where everyone reaches a certain age and sayonara.

Ok a bit far fetched maybe but i think we are setting a dangerous precedent.

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Yeah i agree, unscrupulous family members lining up to have their parents or grandparents removed so they can get their hands on their cash or property.The whole thing could degenerate in years to come.A bit like Logan's run where everyone reaches a certain age and sayonara.

Ok a bit far fetched maybe but i think we are setting a dangerous precedent.

This is my single reason for not supporting voluntary euthanasia in any form - people are already cynical about life and death and there is already a huge body of evidence about the lack of care of elderly, disabled or terminally ill people by their so called "loved ones".

I do feel for those who have every good reason to wish to end it though - I wish I knew a failsafe way to allow them the dignity of choice.

Unfortunately we have to live with the reality that these actions deserve detailed scrutiny by the courts in every instance and legalising euthanasia may prevent that - which in turn, as said above, opens the door to the possibility of criminal behaviour against the most vulnerable members of society.

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The lack of effective pain control measures (usually drugs) for lots of conditions creates the dilemma. Opiates create massive problems for extended usage, and there really is not a lot else that does the job reliably. I have seen people with serious pain being offered no more than Paracetamol on a long-term basis, because there really isn't a great deal in the armoury for pain.

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i know i would want to die if it were me.

as for this poor guy, it's his hell not theirs. he should be allowed to leave it - with dignity.

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We have a Right To Die law in my state which allows for doctor assisted suicide. It's been rather successful. Many of taken advantage of the law and which has been a great relief to family and loved ones.

That being said... in my state, this gentleman would not qualify for a legal doctor assisted suicide. The primary reason being that he's not terminal. Here, you have to be both terminal and you have to be of sound mind to take the legal option. I'm in support of our doctor assisted suicide laws here, but this is an extra tough question in the OP.

Hundreds of thousands live with locked in type diseases every day making the best of what they have. ALS sufferers, MS sufferers, people with cerebral palsey are in similar situtations... some even make great contributions to society as well. Of course, it would horrific to live with something like Locked in Syndrome, but people with locked in can also make small slow improvements over time too. I don't know if I could make a legal or moral call on this one. I don't know.

In the case of a legal doctor assisted suicide (as defined in my state) the patient is asking the doctor to speed up an inevitable death sentence. It's a simple question of die now or die 6 months from now naturally while enduring pain and suffering. Mr. Nickilsons case is quite a bit different from the terminal patient's case. Mr. Nickilson is uncomfortable, unhappy, depressed, tired and sucidal. A lot of people are... I just don't know. It might open the doors for doctor assissted suicide which might be unethical. This is a very very hard question.

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This is a complete no-brainer for me - yes he has a right to die, everyone does, it's your life and no one else's. It should only be a doctor that can do this though, not family members, spouses or friends, and the case should be looked at and overseen by a further 2 or 3 independent doctors (independent from the one being asked to do it, and his/her practise) just to ensure no foul play is going on there. I will also add that the doctor should have the right to refuse and refer it to another doctor, since i'm sure plenty wouldn't want this dilemma to begin with.

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Update -

Tony Nicklinson, a man with locked-in syndrome who fought for the right for doctors to legally end his life, has died.

The 58-year-old was paralysed from the neck down after suffering a stroke in 2005 and described his life as a "living nightmare".

Last week Mr Nicklinson, from Melksham, Wiltshire, lost his High Court case to allow doctors to end his life.

His family solicitor said that he had refused food from last week.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...ngland-19341722

He got his wish in the end but not the way he wanted. Very sad for all concerned....RIP

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Do We Have the Right to be Killed?

No, not in Britain.

If you were a sick dog or cat or some other pet the vet would be allowed to put you down.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun
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It's a tough and sensitive issue.

In my opinion I think it should be allowed by law. If someone is in that much pain and suffering, is it not the more humane thing to do to let them pass on? I guess you can't really make a judgement unless you are in the situation or know of someone in a situation like this.

I mean, when someone is gravely ill in hopsital, family members are given the choice to turn off the ventilator. Now, I know it might not be the same thing but I think that's quite an important thing to say.

If I was suffering and in that much pain, I'd want to pass away. There is no point in letting someone sit there or lie there in agony all because the law says they aren't allowed assisted suicides.

If that person agrees to it and that is their final wish, then let them go and end their suffering

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It's a tough and sensitive issue.

In my opinion I think it should be allowed by law. If someone is in that much pain and suffering, is it not the more humane thing to do to let them pass on? I guess you can't really make a judgement unless you are in the situation or know of someone in a situation like this.

I mean, when someone is gravely ill in hopsital, family members are given the choice to turn off the ventilator. Now, I know it might not be the same thing but I think that's quite an important thing to say.

If I was suffering and in that much pain, I'd want to pass away. There is no point in letting someone sit there or lie there in agony all because the law says they aren't allowed assisted suicides.

If that person agrees to it and that is their final wish, then let them go and end their suffering

You pretty much said what I was going to say. :tu:

Edited by Coffey

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When i was last in hospital,the guy at the side of me had liver cancer and it was in its final stages.The poor guy was in so much pain that he was being given morphine every hour and crying out in pain...he lasted for 4 days like that before he passed away....how is it fair to let him have his last days on earth like he did..?...sad... if it was me then id have liked to have been given the choice...

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I know a man who is elderly and in failing health. He has decided that when he can no longer get about on his own power he is going to end his life. He keeps loaded handguns in several locations just in case he should fall and say, break a hip or leg. He is SERIOUS about not being put through such an indignity as you mentioned BP. I'm torn over his choice because he is my friend. But because he is my friend AND because I know he is quite sane I will do nothing to stop or even deter him. People have a right to their dignity.

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I see quite a few responses "It's ok, but... so who decides where the "but" line is? That's really my concern, who will be drawing the line? I'm all for suicide if that's what you want, not some panel at an insurance company or moral board.

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