Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Abramelin

Hooded Crows & Housecats : weird behaviour

14 posts in this topic

I didn't even know what title to give this post.

Watch the next Russian (?) video, I think it's amazing:

What the hell were these crows up to??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Yeh, what are those crows up to? I can only guess.

My surmisal though

- the cats know each other, they are mates and play rough all the time.

- I say this because of the way the tail was swishing on the white cat, it was playful and encouraging.

- My cats do this all the time - and the Tomcat does it to me, when he wants me to play, if I ignore him, he starts tearing up and down the stairs and bouncing off the walls :lol: .

- The crows may have observed this in the past and enjoyed it OR

- The crows may have seen the possibility of a "free meal" from the loser of the cat fight - destined for dissappointment me thinks

OR my personal fave idea

- they are all mates crows and cats and this a regular routine for play with them all:w00t::wub:

Edited by libstaK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like they are after the one cat's tail :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shsssh...First rule of fightclub...Never talk about fightclub. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe a hatchling has fallen out of a nearby tree and the crows (parents) are trying to keep the cats back. Then the cats start fighting over it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've no idea why they do it, but I've seen footage of ravens acting the same way with wolves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing timing between the action and the music.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeh, what are those crows up to? I can only guess.

My surmisal though

- the cats know each other, they are mates and play rough all the time.

- I say this because of the way the tail was swishing on the white cat, it was playful and encouraging.

- My cats do this all the time - and the Tomcat does it to me, when he wants me to play, if I ignore him, he starts tearing up and down the stairs and bouncing off the walls :lol: .

- The crows may have observed this in the past and enjoyed it OR

- The crows may have seen the possibility of a "free meal" from the loser of the cat fight - destined for dissappointment me thinks

OR my personal fave idea

- they are all mates crows and cats and this a regular routine for play with them all:w00t::wub:

My cats never fight this rough.It looks like 2 time fighting in a territorial way.

The crows are just wild.It makes me think all those bad animal movies,where actors dub in the animals talking ,are real.

The crows are chatting and egging on the cats.

Imagine it:bird 1 DON'T THAT THAT FROM HIM BLACKIE ! HE'S A CANDY A55 .

Bird 2

Oh shut up,just get the tail,and blackie will leave us alone.he said so !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try to imagine that you and a friend try to grab the tail of a lion, tame or wild.

Then try the same when two lions are fighting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you guys haven't seen this it's definitely worth watching!! (I'm not sure if there's a video with better sound quality sorry!)

So maybe they're all friends in the OP!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know but if you've ever seen smaller birds chasing larger birds away from their nests, that pretty close to what they do, fly up and peck 'em in the backside. The small ones do it to the crows and the crows in turn do it to hawks and vultures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know but if you've ever seen smaller birds chasing larger birds away from their nests, that pretty close to what they do, fly up and peck 'em in the backside. The small ones do it to the crows and the crows in turn do it to hawks and vultures.

I think this is a somewhat different situation. The crows are interfering in a catfight, or it looks that way.

Or they don't care about any catfight, and they don't want a piece of tail-meat, and maybe the crows were a breeding couple and did anything they could to tease and chase the cats away to defend their own young in some tree nearby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Just email Chris Packham. He'll know what the crows are up to.

Viewers send in such strange animal videos to the BBC series Springwatch and the BBC series Autumnwatch, and Packham usually solves the mystery.

Edited by TheLastLazyGun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Just email Chris Packham. He'll know what the crows are up to.

Viewers send in such strange animal videos to the BBC series Springwatch and the BBC series Autumnwatch, and Packham usually solves the mystery.

I think I've seen this guy on the BBC here in Holland. I read up on his bio on his "Biog" just now, lol, and he started his life like I did: my room was also kind of a 'zoo': toads, frogs, salamanders, spiders, turtles, jackdaws. OK, I didn't have all these critters at the same time, but still. If I had to start all over again, I would do things differently (yeah, I know it's the most boring cliche around, sigh) and study biology on a university level.

Anyway, I think the explanation of that weird behaviour is what I posted in my former post.

For those who like an experiment: take a black cloth in your hand while walking near a crow's roost during breeding season. If you have ever seen "The Birds" by Alfred Hitchcock, you will experience a 'deja vu'.

.

Edited by Abramelin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.