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-vv-

Zener Cards

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Posted (edited)

I’ve been practicing with the Zener cards for a while, looking to find out any extrasensory perception (ESP) giftedness in myself, without getting more than the average 20% of guessing.

*snip*

I have also tried them with everybody who wanted to volunteer for the test. Nothing yet, but I am not giving up. I am sure there is some gifted candidate out there. I am determinate to reproduce the success that Dr. Rhine got in 1931 in his laboratory.

The Zener cards were created by Dr. Karl Edward Zener, a psychologist from Harvard University who in 1930, along with colleague J.B. Rhine, devised the card symbols that were used by Rhine in early ESP tests. Rhine called cards bearing these symbols "Zener cards" in honour of his colleague.

The Zener Cards consist in a standard pack of cards containing 25 cards, each portraying one of five symbols, viz., circle, cross, square, star, and waves. The cards would be shuffled and a receiver would then try to guess the cards that a sender would try to telepathically communicate. Or a subject might try to guess which card from the deck would be turned up next. A correct "guess" is called a "hit". Anything significantly higher than an average 20% hit in the long run would indicate some possible ESP condition.

In 1934, drawing upon several years of meticulous lab research and statistical analysis, Rhine published the first edition of a book titled Extrasensory Perception. He claimed in his book that he’d done over 90,000 trials and could justifiably conclude that ESP is “an actual and demonstrable occurrence.” There were attempts to duplicate these trials at Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Colgate, Southern Methodist, and Brown without success. Critics could not find evidence in Rhine’s report that he was as systematic and careful as one would expect a scientist to be who was making such an extraordinary claim. Statistics of coincidence, the unreproducible results, tricks of the magic trade, suggestions, are the most frequent criticism from skeptics that refuse the extrasensory perception existence.

In the years since Rhine's pioneering work, hundreds of parapsychologists have conducted similar experiments, claiming the same positive results. Most of these researchers have moved away from the rigid patterns of Zener cards to more open-ended images, such as paintings or photographs. A survey published in New Scientist, on January 25, 1973, indicate that 25% of scientists polled considered extrasensorimotor phenomena "an established fact." Another 42% opted for "a likely possibility."

What do you think?

vv

Edited by Daughter of the Nine Moons
removed self promotional link

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Hello -vv-

Thank you for posting. If you wish to discuss this topic, please do so here and not redirect our members to your personal blog.

Regards,

Dot ~ Forum Moderator

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Hello -vv-

Thank you for posting. If you wish to discuss this topic, please do so here and not redirect our members to your personal blog.

Regards,

Dot ~ Forum Moderator

no problem, I think I messed up the new topic's tab with the post news one, and in this last one you should put a link

how about add references about my research?

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