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Still Waters

Expedition to Seek Living Dinosaurs in Africa

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that's so cool, wish I could go. Hope they find something. Is it true there are no more uncontacted humans anymore, never to have had any contact with the outside world..

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spiders the size of canines, hmm no thanks. I can't believe that people would fund them, I mean the lack of knowledge in those feilds itself makes me think they will explain anything that makes a bush move as a undiscovered dinosaur. Don't think they would ever make it back alive if they did go. I would rather go to Ireland and drink Guiness tell I see leprechauns personally, hear they are more noticable after you drink a few :tsu:

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well obviously. Look at his Avatar! Hello mister alium! :rolleyes:

Guess i ignored the profile picture. Sorry oh Great One, i deeply apologize :whistle:

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Guess i ignored the profile picture. Sorry oh Great One, i deeply apologize :whistle:

You'd think he/she/it would be able to at least spell properly and use correct grammar...

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You dont have to go all the way to Africa to see living dinosaurs....just come and meet the wifes mother.

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I wish him good luck. If I was him I would go after any monitor lizard I would come across. What kind of animal looks like the most old representations of sauropods anyway ?

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You'd think he/she/it would be able to at least spell properly and use correct grammar...

He doesn't have to, he's the "One" :alien:

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Posted (edited)

So basically me and couple of buds want some cash so we can go on a cool trip - and bring a tranq rifle if they'll let us.

As a member of the expedition, a statement like this is sad. The Congo is not a vacation destination. We will be dealing with anti-malarial resistant mosquitoes, tsetse flies that carry African Sleeping Sickness & elephantitis, schitoasis in the rivers and swamps, and security will be uncertain. For the few ignorant people out there that think we're going to risk our health and safety for a "cool trip" are dead-wrong. For the few of you out there that may have visisted Africa before in maybe Botswana or Kenya, then I can confirm that the tsetse flies are going to be far worst in the Congo because they haven't been largely eradicated as they have been in other countries.

I am going because this part of the world is 80% unexplored and one of the last places on the planet that has solid mysteries that everyone can attest to have some curiousity toward. I can't divulge everything about the location or documentary topics but I can confirm that we will be the first group filming in the swampy jungles for 3 months. This is extraordinary undertaking and is not without it's difficulties.

We will be taking some military grade thernal scopes and night vision. Although, I must admit that this hasn't helped other expeditions in the past. However, few expeditions have spent more than 3 months in the jungle.

As for the individual who mentioned about cannibals in the Congo--I can only confirm that they indeed exist but the western world hasn't heard much about it as details are hard to get out from the North Democratic Republic of Congo. Hopefully, this will be an area that we explore in our documentary if we have time and resources.

The Congo has several species that are reported but remain unconfirmed by mainstream science (i.e. new primate species). We hope to reveal some of the Congo's secrets that others have failed to do so before us.

Although we have raised funds to cover the expedition, we are still seeking funding to pursue the documentary project that we desire to produce. You can read more about it HERE

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/joemarrero/mokele-mbembe-expedition-documentary-film

Edited by Joe Marrero

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As a member of the expedition, a statement like this is sad. The Congo is not a vacation destination. We will be dealing with anti-malarial resistant mosquitoes, tsetse flies that carry African Sleeping Sickness & elephantitis, schitoasis in the rivers and swamps, and security will be uncertain. For the few ignorant people out there that think we're going to risk our health and safety for a "cool trip" are dead-wrong. For the few of you out there that may have visisted Africa before in maybe Botswana or Kenya, then I can confirm that the tsetse flies are going to be far worst in the Congo because they haven't been largely eradicated as they have been in other countries.

I am going because this part of the world is 80% unexplored and one of the last places on the planet that has solid mysteries that everyone can attest to have some curiousity toward. I can't divulge everything about the location or documentary topics but I can confirm that we will be the first group filming in the swampy jungles for 3 months. This is extraordinary undertaking and is not without it's difficulties.

We will be taking some military grade thernal scopes and night vision. Although, I must admit that this hasn't helped other expeditions in the past. However, few expeditions have spent more than 3 months in the jungle.

As for the individual who mentioned about cannibals in the Congo--I can only confirm that they indeed exist but the western world hasn't heard much about it as details are hard to get out from the North Democratic Republic of Congo. Hopefully, this will be an area that we explore in our documentary if we have time and resources.

The Congo has several species that are reported but remain unconfirmed by mainstream science (i.e. new primate species). We hope to reveal some of the Congo's secrets that others have failed to do so before us.

Although we have raised funds to cover the expedition, we are still seeking funding to pursue the documentary project that we desire to produce. You can read more about it HERE

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/joemarrero/mokele-mbembe-expedition-documentary-film

Do you, or any of the others, have any experience in this type of expedition? What qualifications do you, or the others have regarding survival etc? These are just two questions I would have to ask prior to parting with any cash towards your fund. Not that I am going to. Just asking :)

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You'd think he/she/it would be able to at least spell properly and use correct grammar...

Haters be hating -.-

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Posted (edited)

Do you, or any of the others, have any experience in this type of expedition? What qualifications do you, or the others have regarding survival etc? These are just two questions I would have to ask prior to parting with any cash towards your fund. Not that I am going to. Just asking :)

Let's start with myself first. I have spent several weeks at a time in the jungles of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Peru. In Belize, I was taught how to find water, make cordage, prepare hammocks, and what to eat (termite nests in trees, etc..). In Honduras, I accidentally cut one of my little toes on sharp coral and, after a week, noticed it wasn't healing and turning septic. I had to use additional medical supplies for a wound that should not have needed it. I have first hand experience on how wounds behave differently in the hot moist tropics. In Florida, I occasionally go hunting and fishing--I have cleaned both pigs and fish before. I have hiked in the back woods of the Florida Everglades and have hiked abroad. I have eaten some gross things (grass hoppers, termites,...) before but I am certainly no Bear Grylls--he seems to not mind it at all. I prefer to cook my food. From my experience, the Everglades and the humidity of Florida provide the same difficulties for producing a friction fire as they do in the jungle. My role is primarily a filmer and documenter but will serve a cross functional role as needed.

The expedition leader is Stephen McCullah--a biologist. He has spent time living with natives in Bolivia and Brazil. In Brazil, he has lived with a tribe for 3 months. He comes from a family of missionaries and has lived in various countries. In particular, he and his family has done missionary and humanitarian work in Nicaragua as well. In Nicaragua, he lived there for 3 years. He, like myself, has experienced the harsh jungle first hand and is an outdoorsmen.

Sam is an experienced backwoods hiker and outdoorsmen. I have been told by Stephen that he is quite the survivalist and has some amazing bushcraft tricks. Sam and Stephen are longtime childhood friends.

There are 3 other members of the expedition but I am not personally familiar with their strengths and weaknesses. One of which is an ecology expert.

Just to clarify--we have already raised enough funds to pay for the expedition. I am personally attempting to raise funds to cover the production costs of filming in the jungle for 3 months. We expect to film many hours of footage and wish to share our expedition with the world.

Edited by Joe Marrero

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You can read more about the expedition here.

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You can read more about the expedition here.

Hi Joe

I find the expedition curious, as you say, you are up against it, the diseases flies and local dangers are really something to be concerned about. How do you feel about the Marcy Milt expeditions, and the results they garnered?

I am also interested in the relevance of Colonel Remy's photograph. Titanboa shows us that a snake biologically can reach this length, do you feel that the Colonels photo is genuine?

What I find really makes me wonder is may I ask what exactly do you expect to encounter in your Mokele Mbembe chase? With all due respect, you cannot be chasing a Sauropod, do you have an idea what might be causing the confusion, and is that what you hope to discover, or do you have an actual target in mind?

I will be very much looking forward to seeing the documentary, I am hoping to that you can film some cross river apes, and what is the possible undiscovered primate you mention? I am also very much looking forward to the insiders view on the cultural aspects, as horrific as they may become, they are a part of the world and something I think most people should be aware of. This world is a very colorful place.

Good Luck with it.

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Let's start with myself first. I have spent several weeks at a time in the jungles of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Peru. In Belize, I was taught how to find water, make cordage, prepare hammocks, and what to eat (termite nests in trees, etc..). In Honduras, I accidentally cut one of my little toes on sharp coral and, after a week, noticed it wasn't healing and turning septic. I had to use additional medical supplies for a wound that should not have needed it. I have first hand experience on how wounds behave differently in the hot moist tropics. In Florida, I occasionally go hunting and fishing--I have cleaned both pigs and fish before. I have hiked in the back woods of the Florida Everglades and have hiked abroad. I have eaten some gross things (grass hoppers, termites,...) before but I am certainly no Bear Grylls--he seems to not mind it at all. I prefer to cook my food. From my experience, the Everglades and the humidity of Florida provide the same difficulties for producing a friction fire as they do in the jungle. My role is primarily a filmer and documenter but will serve a cross functional role as needed.

The expedition leader is Stephen McCullah--a biologist. He has spent time living with natives in Bolivia and Brazil. In Brazil, he has lived with a tribe for 3 months. He comes from a family of missionaries and has lived in various countries. In particular, he and his family has done missionary and humanitarian work in Nicaragua as well. In Nicaragua, he lived there for 3 years. He, like myself, has experienced the harsh jungle first hand and is an outdoorsmen.

Sam is an experienced backwoods hiker and outdoorsmen. I have been told by Stephen that he is quite the survivalist and has some amazing bushcraft tricks. Sam and Stephen are longtime childhood friends.

There are 3 other members of the expedition but I am not personally familiar with their strengths and weaknesses. One of which is an ecology expert.

Just to clarify--we have already raised enough funds to pay for the expedition. I am personally attempting to raise funds to cover the production costs of filming in the jungle for 3 months. We expect to film many hours of footage and wish to share our expedition with the world.

Thank you for your reply Joe. All I can say is good luck. Hopefully you will come out of this alive and with some interesting footage. I wish you well :)

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Haters be hating -.-

Aliens be alienatin'

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I find the expedition curious, as you say, you are up against it, the diseases flies and local dangers are really something to be concerned about. How do you feel about the Marcy Milt expeditions, and the results they garnered?

I believe Milt Marcy expedition was close. I vaguely recall that they were delayed in getting their permits but I might be confusing them with another expedition. Losing time due to travel delays occurs all the time. To imagine, missing an encounter by two days has to be gut wrenching.

Many of the mokele researchers believe the creature migrates in the rivers and swamps between Cameroon, Gabon and the Congo. Most sightings occur in the rainy season where the creature occasionally comes out of the water.

Most of the swampy wet terrain is in the Congo. Because the Marcy Expedition, Bill Gibbons, Michel Ballot and others focus their search in South Cameroon at the confluence of the Dja and Boumba rivers, they are searching at the doorstep of the ROC's border.

I am also interested in the relevance of Colonel Remy's photograph. Titanboa shows us that a snake biologically can reach this length, do you feel that the Colonels photo is genuine?

The photo is undoctored and has a negative to go along with it. The problem with photographing unknown objects is determining scale. The experts all agree that it's genuinely of a large snake in the jungle, but I think the debate is still out on how large it really was. The colonel is a respected WW2 veteran with an impeccable reputation. Moreover, he was only the pilot and another witness photographed and corrobarates his story.

What I find really makes me wonder is may I ask what exactly do you expect to encounter in your Mokele Mbembe chase? With all due respect, you cannot be chasing a Sauropod, do you have an idea what might be causing the confusion, and is that what you hope to discover, or do you have an actual target in mind?

I am going to save this answer for the documentary but I believe it is a real creature.

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Do these yahoos even have any background in botony or survival training?

Plus whats there plans if they even did catch glimpse of such a creature besides running from it?

Sounds like the beginnings of a viral video for the next home shot paranormal activity like movie.

nuff said.

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I believe Milt Marcy expedition was close. I vaguely recall that they were delayed in getting their permits but I might be confusing them with another expedition. Losing time due to travel delays occurs all the time. To imagine, missing an encounter by two days has to be gut wrenching.

Many of the mokele researchers believe the creature migrates in the rivers and swamps between Cameroon, Gabon and the Congo. Most sightings occur in the rainy season where the creature occasionally comes out of the water.

Most of the swampy wet terrain is in the Congo. Because the Marcy Expedition, Bill Gibbons, Michel Ballot and others focus their search in South Cameroon at the confluence of the Dja and Boumba rivers, they are searching at the doorstep of the ROC's border.

The photo is undoctored and has a negative to go along with it. The problem with photographing unknown objects is determining scale. The experts all agree that it's genuinely of a large snake in the jungle, but I think the debate is still out on how large it really was. The colonel is a respected WW2 veteran with an impeccable reputation. Moreover, he was only the pilot and another witness photographed and corrobarates his story.

I am going to save this answer for the documentary but I believe it is a real creature.

I do have admiration and respect for you to go out there and be looking. My personal opinion is that your belief in the creature's existence will undermine the credibility of your mission. Anything you see, hear, touch, or smell will pass through the filter of your belief and be clouded by it in an attempt to support a conclusion you have already reached.

You seem like an intelligent man, and I don't doubt the credentials of your cohorts. If you were trekking to Africa to gather whatever data you could without an agenda in mind I think the credibility of what you find would be enhanced greatly.

Either way I wish you the best.

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I do have admiration and respect for you to go out there and be looking. My personal opinion is that your belief in the creature's existence will undermine the credibility of your mission. Anything you see, hear, touch, or smell will pass through the filter of your belief and be clouded by it in an attempt to support a conclusion you have already reached.

You seem like an intelligent man, and I don't doubt the credentials of your cohorts. If you were trekking to Africa to gather whatever data you could without an agenda in mind I think the credibility of what you find would be enhanced greatly.

Either way I wish you the best.

Thank you. I agree that an observer must not be biased but all research starts with a hypothesis. Either the evidence supports the conjecture or it doesn't.

Other expeditions in the past that were motivated primarily to film a television program were biased. The BBC expedition does not acknowledge that the Mokele-mbembe is a phrase use collectively describe several creatures--one, an alleged a sauropod and another a rhino-like creature. They construed the statements made by the pygmies to support their thesis.

The History Channel's Monster Quest program did not even search for the Mokele-mbembe in the rainy season. Their intention was not research but entertainment.

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Posted (edited)

I believe Milt Marcy expedition was close. I vaguely recall that they were delayed in getting their permits but I might be confusing them with another expedition. Losing time due to travel delays occurs all the time. To imagine, missing an encounter by two days has to be gut wrenching.

Many of the mokele researchers believe the creature migrates in the rivers and swamps between Cameroon, Gabon and the Congo. Most sightings occur in the rainy season where the creature occasionally comes out of the water.

Most of the swampy wet terrain is in the Congo. Because the Marcy Expedition, Bill Gibbons, Michel Ballot and others focus their search in South Cameroon at the confluence of the Dja and Boumba rivers, they are searching at the doorstep of the ROC's border.

Hi Joe

I was quite disappointed in the Marcy Milt expeditions. I had been following the last two quite closely, and expected much from the 2006 expedition which was cut short. It was re-labeled a prelim mission and we were told that in 2007 a better expedition would bring us real proof. That the follow up never happened, and that the initial one was cut short with little fanfare makes me think that perhaps they did find Mokele Mbembe, and it was a mundane finding. Perhaps my own expectations were too high, but the quiet from that camp after the supposed footprint is hard to rationalise any other way. If the footprint was genuine, I expect it would have created quite a stir amongst the scientific community. Or at least the crypto community, yet all I hear is "they found a footprint". Very deflating.

I always thought Bill's 1992 expedition seemed the most thorough and genuine to date.

Have you approached the Congolese Government? I am interested to see if they support you. One member here (Capeoiranger) said he had contacted them some years ago now and asked them about the creature and they literally laughed in his face.

May I ask, what decision would your expedition make if you find Mokele Mbembe is a garden variety Rhino?

The photo is undoctored and has a negative to go along with it. The problem with photographing unknown objects is determining scale. The experts all agree that it's genuinely of a large snake in the jungle, but I think the debate is still out on how large it really was. The colonel is a respected WW2 veteran with an impeccable reputation. Moreover, he was only the pilot and another witness photographed and corrobarates his story.

I would agree. 30 foot sounds quite plausible but I cannot make out the head rearing. That part is a mystery. The snake looks very shiny in the photo, it is amazing that it was considered not added in later. But as you say, The Colonel does have an impeccable reputation, that being the main reason the photo is considered so closely.

I am going to save this answer for the documentary but I believe it is a real creature.

I am quietly assuming this might have something to do with the previous phrase.

I look forward to it, will it be available online or in outlets?

I know you will not find a Sauropod based upon fossil record and foot structure, but I do think some type of aquatic Rhino unknown to science, perhaps even with a tail of sorts, is not completely out of the question.

Sorry if I was a bit flippant earlier in the piece, I appreciate that you came here to corroborate the story for us. It seemed rather fantastic to be honset, but in any case, I do envy you. I respect Jon Whitcomb for the same reasons. It is encouraging to see people raise their own funds and get out there amongst it. I wish you well.

Thank you. I agree that an observer must not be biased but all research starts with a hypothesis. Either the evidence supports the conjecture or it doesn't.

Other expeditions in the past that were motivated primarily to film a television program were biased. The BBC expedition does not acknowledge that the Mokele-mbembe is a phrase use collectively describe several creatures--one, an alleged a sauropod and another a rhino-like creature. They construed the statements made by the pygmies to support their thesis.

The History Channel's Monster Quest program did not even search for the Mokele-mbembe in the rainy season. Their intention was not research but entertainment.

I must say, that is certainly a healthy approach. I agree with all of this.

Cheers.

Edited by psyche101

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As a member of the expedition, a statement like this is sad. The Congo is not a vacation destination. We will be dealing with anti-malarial resistant mosquitoes, tsetse flies that carry African Sleeping Sickness & elephantitis, schitoasis in the rivers and swamps, and security will be uncertain. For the few ignorant people out there that think we're going to risk our health and safety for a "cool trip" are dead-wrong. For the few of you out there that may have visisted Africa before in maybe Botswana or Kenya, then I can confirm that the tsetse flies are going to be far worst in the Congo because they haven't been largely eradicated as they have been in other countries.

I am going because this part of the world is 80% unexplored and one of the last places on the planet that has solid mysteries that everyone can attest to have some curiousity toward. I can't divulge everything about the location or documentary topics but I can confirm that we will be the first group filming in the swampy jungles for 3 months. This is extraordinary undertaking and is not without it's difficulties.

We will be taking some military grade thernal scopes and night vision. Although, I must admit that this hasn't helped other expeditions in the past. However, few expeditions have spent more than 3 months in the jungle.

As for the individual who mentioned about cannibals in the Congo--I can only confirm that they indeed exist but the western world hasn't heard much about it as details are hard to get out from the North Democratic Republic of Congo. Hopefully, this will be an area that we explore in our documentary if we have time and resources.

The Congo has several species that are reported but remain unconfirmed by mainstream science (i.e. new primate species). We hope to reveal some of the Congo's secrets that others have failed to do so before us.

Although we have raised funds to cover the expedition, we are still seeking funding to pursue the documentary project that we desire to produce. You can read more about it HERE

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/joemarrero/mokele-mbembe-expedition-documentary-film

Hi Joe, its great that you have posted here and answered some of the questions that might have been in peoples minds about this expedition, its lead to some good Q&A's. I find the Mokele legend really interesting (if a little implausible) but am still hoping for a solid explanation.

Looking forward to your safe return and hopefully some interesting results.

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Do these yahoos even have any background in botony or survival training?

Plus whats there plans if they even did catch glimpse of such a creature besides running from it?

Sounds like the beginnings of a viral video for the next home shot paranormal activity like movie.

nuff said.

Does this "yahoo" ever read the thread before posting?

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Let's start with myself first. I have spent several weeks at a time in the jungles of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Peru. In Belize, I was taught how to find water, make cordage, prepare hammocks, and what to eat (termite nests in trees, etc..). In Honduras, I accidentally cut one of my little toes on sharp coral and, after a week, noticed it wasn't healing and turning septic. I had to use additional medical supplies for a wound that should not have needed it. I have first hand experience on how wounds behave differently in the hot moist tropics. In Florida, I occasionally go hunting and fishing--I have cleaned both pigs and fish before. I have hiked in the back woods of the Florida Everglades and have hiked abroad. I have eaten some gross things (grass hoppers, termites,...) before but I am certainly no Bear Grylls--he seems to not mind it at all. I prefer to cook my food. From my experience, the Everglades and the humidity of Florida provide the same difficulties for producing a friction fire as they do in the jungle. My role is primarily a filmer and documenter but will serve a cross functional role as needed.

The expedition leader is Stephen McCullah--a biologist. He has spent time living with natives in Bolivia and Brazil. In Brazil, he has lived with a tribe for 3 months. He comes from a family of missionaries and has lived in various countries. In particular, he and his family has done missionary and humanitarian work in Nicaragua as well. In Nicaragua, he lived there for 3 years. He, like myself, has experienced the harsh jungle first hand and is an outdoorsmen.

Sam is an experienced backwoods hiker and outdoorsmen. I have been told by Stephen that he is quite the survivalist and has some amazing bushcraft tricks. Sam and Stephen are longtime childhood friends.

There are 3 other members of the expedition but I am not personally familiar with their strengths and weaknesses. One of which is an ecology expert.

Just to clarify--we have already raised enough funds to pay for the expedition. I am personally attempting to raise funds to cover the production costs of filming in the jungle for 3 months. We expect to film many hours of footage and wish to share our expedition with the world.

Impressive, that part of Africa isn't for the faint of heart and it sounds like you guys have the skills you'll need. My biggest concern would be the humans, lots of kidnapping, lots of rape......and yes, both sexes........not to mention just plain old murder for your gear. Don't get me wrong, if I were a younger man I might be willing to go with you if all I had to consider was the terrain and conditions. Good luck to you.

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Posted (edited)

I don't get why people think the Congo will hold dinosaurs. Huge animals in confined spaces is so illogical it doesn't bare thinking about (I guess that is most peoples issue). Secondly, the Congo is around 200000 years old, meaning dinosaurs had been gone 64 million years before the forest ever existed.

EDIT:Just to add, be warely of even harmless fauna in the Congo, both ebola and marburg viruses are known in that region.

Edited by Mattshark

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Dino Hunters Secure Necessary Funding For Congo Expedition

Stephen McCullah needed to raise $26,700 by May 11 in order to secure enough funds through Kickstarter.com to, well, kickstart his expedition to the Republic of Congo to hunt a reported living dinosaur.

When the deadline arrived, the 21-year-old adventurer and Missouri native had received pledges totaling nearly $29,000.

He's now packing his bags and a powerful tranquilizer rifle -- to bring down a possible dinosaur during what he has dubbed the Newmac Expedition.

Read more...

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