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Flibbertigibbet

Ley line maps of Britain

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Just found these ley line maps of Britain. The most striking thing to me is that they are completely different. Ley lines, I think, have been misrepresented. I know from orienteering that such alignments exist on the ground, but as for all the wild theories about them, I'm a bit more circumspect.

49.jpg

EnglandWales.jpg

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Where did you get the second image from ? I would like to see if there is one that includes Scotland.

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This map doesn't show most of them, I have fair idea of where 'some are' though, just be interested if any other maps show them.

post-33441-0-45193900-1335951731_thumb.j

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Where did you get the second image from ? I would like to see if there is one that includes Scotland.

I Googled "ley line map uk", it was from here http://blindcatwhiskers.blogspot.co.uk/2010/11/collection-of-maps-of-leylinesmagnetic.html

Just found this though from here http://www.the-leaky-cauldron.org/features/essays/issue16

Scotland.jpg

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Interesting and thanks very much :tu:

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So what is the most current thoughts on Ley Lines among the UM'ers? I've always found them rather interesting -

though I am leaning more to the side of "Geographical Coincidence" ...

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So what is the most current thoughts on Ley Lines among the UM'ers? I've always found them rather interesting -

though I am leaning more to the side of "Geographical Coincidence" ...

They clearly exist on the ground. Very often one sees archetypal ley markers, such as clumps of trees, unusual stones, edges of medieval hedges and roads, etc., lining up with some notch in the hills on the horizon. If you then follow this line you find other markers along the way. But whether there are ones that span the whole country is another matter, because it's not just about lining up ancient monuments hundreds of miles apart. One would need to follow the proposed ley on the ground, all the way. I'd love to try that sometime.

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Posted (edited)

It seems like one person who has been ignored for the longest time has been writing lots about Ley lines. He's name was Tom C Lethbridge.

just found this link thus the edit and this one

Edited by Paracelse

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It seems like one person who has been ignored for the longest time has been writing lots about Ley lines. He's name was Tom C Lethbridge.

Not sure what I think about all that pendulum stuff. Do ley lines represent energy lines? This wasn't part of Alfred Watkins' original idea. Having said that I've experienced dowsing with metal rods, both having done it myself and seen others do it, at the Rollright Stones, Oxfordshire, where the rods always twisted at the same spot, where a ley line was supposed to cut across the path.

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At one time (centuries ago when I was a kid :) ) weren't Ley Lines supposed to be the tracks of "Trooping Fairies"?

(In Ireland - The Sidhe)...

I do remember reading a story of someone who built a house that had one corner over one of these lines, and all sorts of misfortune supposedly struck the family, until they knocked down the corner, then it all stopped... It could just be an "Urban Myth" from the time, But I have heard of strange things supposedly happening along these lines...

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At one time (centuries ago when I was a kid :) ) weren't Ley Lines supposed to be the tracks of "Trooping Fairies"?

(In Ireland - The Sidhe)...

I do remember reading a story of someone who built a house that had one corner over one of these lines, and all sorts of misfortune supposedly struck the family, until they knocked down the corner, then it all stopped... It could just be an "Urban Myth" from the time, But I have heard of strange things supposedly happening along these lines...

Yes that's exactly right. Trooping fairies always travelled in straight lines along the same path. They only did it at certain times of year, like May Day, called fairy moving days, and if your house was on their path you were supposed to leave the doors open and a glass of milk for them.

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The high density of historic and prehistoric sites in Britain and other parts of Europe, finding straight lines that "connect" sites is trivial, and ascribable to coincidence. A statistical analysis of lines concluded that "the density of archaeological sites in the British landscape is so great that a line drawn through virtually anywhere will 'clip' a number of sites.

From Wiki.

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Posted (edited)

The high density of historic and prehistoric sites in Britain and other parts of Europe, finding straight lines that "connect" sites is trivial, and ascribable to coincidence. A statistical analysis of lines concluded that "the density of archaeological sites in the British landscape is so great that a line drawn through virtually anywhere will 'clip' a number of sites.

From Wiki.

Whoever wrote that doesn't understand the concept. It's not about connecting dots on maps, but following clues on the ground. It's a tool for field work.

Edited by Flibbertigibbet

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So what is the most current thoughts on Ley Lines among the UM'ers? I've always found them rather interesting -

though I am leaning more to the side of "Geographical Coincidence" ...

Keep leaning that way.

Ley lines are artificial constructs, created by the fertile minds of the ignorant.

Not being mean. The vast majority of people are ignorant of the mathematics that show these lines are purely random.

Harte

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Keep leaning that way.

Ley lines are artificial constructs, created by the fertile minds of the ignorant.

Not being mean. The vast majority of people are ignorant of the mathematics that show these lines are purely random.

Harte

See my above post. It's got nothing to do with connecting random points on a map, though all its critics seem to think that's what it is.

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Posted (edited)

>>It's got nothing to do with connecting random points on a map, though all its critics seem to think that's what it is.

You do realise that your second map is of places that someone thinks are realworld places that JK Rowling uses as locations in her HP Books. The creator has then tried to draw lines between them to connect them up randomly.

Edited by Pastymancer

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>>It's got nothing to do with connecting random points on a map, though all its critics seem to think that's what it is.

You do realise that your second map is of places that someone thinks are realworld places that JK Rowling uses as locations in her HP Books. The creator has then tried to draw lines between them to connect them up randomly.

Well, they're not my maps. Also note that I criticised them in my opening post.

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I think the notion of ley lines is interesting... But not too sure how much credence I put into them.

I grew up in an area of the US that is supposed to have a lot of line crossing points- and sure enough, that area also has all sorts of stuff like vortexes, burial grounds, witches with deadly books, werewolves, UFO's, a pyramid at the bottom of a lake, ghosts-lots and lots of them, gravity hills, and even a healthy smattering of "saw a little people or something", all in around a 30ish mile area.

Is all that weird piled up in one place because of ley lines? I dunno, could just as easily be because of the legends immigrants brought with them and the area is kind of conducive to telling spooky stories.

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Hmm the Tower of London leyline passes directly through my home town of Burnley.....!

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Posted (edited)

I think the notion of ley lines is interesting... But not too sure how much credence I put into them.

I grew up in an area of the US that is supposed to have a lot of line crossing points- and sure enough, that area also has all sorts of stuff like vortexes, burial grounds, witches with deadly books, werewolves, UFO's, a pyramid at the bottom of a lake, ghosts-lots and lots of them, gravity hills, and even a healthy smattering of "saw a little people or something", all in around a 30ish mile area.

Is all that weird piled up in one place because of ley lines? I dunno, could just as easily be because of the legends immigrants brought with them and the area is kind of conducive to telling spooky stories.

It definitely appears to be the case that weird happenings, ranging from ghosts to UFO sightings and loads of other things, seem to cluster in certain areas. It's one of the best arguments in favour of them not all being hallucinations or misperceptions of some sort.

Edited by Flibbertigibbet

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See my above post. It's got nothing to do with connecting random points on a map, though all its critics seem to think that's what it is.

You are welcome to your opinion.

Obviously, the lines connect various known sites (yet ignore other sites - both known and unknown.)

The randomness comes in when it has been shown that any random (and large enough) collection of lines drawn on any map will connect such sites naturally.

Now, you don't have to believe that. If you're unaware of the mathematics of the situation, I wouldn't blame you.

Harte

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You are welcome to your opinion.

Obviously, the lines connect various known sites (yet ignore other sites - both known and unknown.)

The randomness comes in when it has been shown that any random (and large enough) collection of lines drawn on any map will connect such sites naturally.

Now, you don't have to believe that. If you're unaware of the mathematics of the situation, I wouldn't blame you.

Harte

It has nothing to do with maths, and everything to do with exploring an ancient landscape through field work. I'll repeat what I said earlier, in case you missed it. Ley lines are not lines connecting points on a map.

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Here are some examples of true ley lines, showing how they form part of the landscape. Paul Devereux has suggested they were ancient shamanic spirit paths, which are known from many cultures, and link back to the legends of trooping fairies.

http://www.pauldevereux.co.uk/html/body_leylines.html

pic17.jpg

pic20.jpg

pic21.jpg

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It has nothing to do with maths, and everything to do with exploring an ancient landscape through field work. I'll repeat what I said earlier, in case you missed it. Ley lines are not lines connecting points on a map.

Any line on a map connects points.

Geez, it's worse that I hoped, this mathematical deficiency.

Note:

Ley lines are alleged alignments of a number of places of geographical and historical interest, such as ancient monuments and megaliths, natural ridge-tops and water-fords. Their existence was suggested in 1921 by the amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins, in his books Early British Trackways and The Old Straight Track, commenting "I knew nothing on June 30th last of what I now communicate, and had no theories".[1]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ley_line

"Places of geographical and historical interest." These, pardon me, are certainly points on a map.

Obviously, if you have decided to redifine ley lines in a way that the above is no longer the case, then you're not talking about what other people are talking about when they use the phrase "ley lines."

Harte

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Any line on a map connects points.

Geez, it's worse that I hoped, this mathematical deficiency.

Note:

[/sup]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ley_line

"Places of geographical and historical interest." These, pardon me, are certainly points on a map.

Obviously, if you have decided to redifine ley lines in a way that the above is no longer the case, then you're not talking about what other people are talking about when they use the phrase "ley lines."

Harte

Whoever wrote that Wiki piece doesn't understand them.

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