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Big Bad Voodoo

Underwater city c. 4000 BC found in Croatia

24 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Since only Croats have luxury to read about it I translated to you with help of google.

http://parentium.com...3#axzz1u6w8UD96

At the open today Crofish Fair to be held in Umag, held a lecture and screening the latest sensational archaeological finds in the bay Zambratija. The project presented a host of archaeological research Baner Uhac Ida, archaeologist of the Archaeological Museum in Pula, Istria, and research in recent years led the curators Arheloškog Museum of Istria in Pula. Presents the findings of the Neolithic settlement and the remains of the oldest ship in the Adriatic.

Quite on the northwest shoreline, south of Cape Savudrija, there is a large cove Zambratija. The rich archaeological and cultural history of this region has always attracted the attention of many researchers. With a number of archaeological sites, known to the wider area around Zambratija, have recently emerged to light archaeological finds that its uniqueness may be placed in the top archaeological discovery, she said, presenting the results of Ida Baner Uhac.

Back in September 2008. years, offshore in the bay Zambratija in today's fishing port, where the investor Port Authority Umag - Novigrad performed work on the extension of the existing breakwater, the Archaeological Museum of Istria spent protective archaeological research.

Studies were conducted with the participation of local experts (Niki Fachin, Christian Petretich) and other professional divers. During the research archaeologists and divers perform underwater search and the northern part of the bay, where the seabed found numerous traces of wood residues. Pilot studies conducted in the same year it was determined that it is a submerged prehistoric settlement dating from the late Neolithic to the Early Copper Age.

Prehistoric settlement located in a natural valley potopljenoj relief (probably once zamočvarenoj sinkholes) that extends from the present coastal edge, while the outside (south) side of the high seas protected limestone ridge, that let today (first and second Banjšice as locals call them) .

The site is now located at a depth of 2.5 to 3.20 meters and covers an area of ​​approximately 10 000 m².

Based on our findings, it is assumed that they formed a settlement house built on the pillars of the oak tree which, because they are in the mud of the seabed, extremely well preserved. Pilot studies with smaller areas within the village, with wooden pylons, discovered a large quantity of animal bones and numerous fragments of prehistoric pottery. Discovered archaeological material, compared with identical archaeological finds from other sites in inland Istria, roughly dating site in this period from the late Neolithic to the Early Copper Age. Identical radiocarbon dating confirmed the dates for the analysis of age were obtained from samples of wood piers, at which time the settlement was placed between 4230 and 3980 years before Christ.

With this prehistoric site, the central part of the bay Zambratija 2008th , at a depth of - 2.20 m, just below the thin layer of sand and seaweed fouling Posidonius (Voga), discovered the remains of marine structures, as will be shown later, also from prehistoric times. The specificity of findings is reflected in the fact that the structure is an interesting technique boats binding by sewing a rope through the holes on the edges of planks (madira). During September 2011. The first campaign was carried out archaeological research in order to detect partial ship, based on whose data would be given directions for further research and collect samples for analysis of types of wood and other chemical analysis.

He has discovered the existence of eight planks of the ship troughs made of elm and a ship's ribs. At the edges of the planks were located diagonally drilled holes through which the sewing is done, and there are flashing across the wooden slats in the function to keep the seals. Length of preserved trough boat is estimated at about 6 m, while its width is 2.4 m

Boats in the bay Zambratija, radiocarbon analysis dates for age, tentatively dated to the period of the first millennium BC, which currently holds the title of the oldest boat of this type in the Adriatic. Dating and technical performance of this boat has to be considered a forerunner of later šivanih ships that are known in several localities of the Adriatic, which will show future research.

Edited by Melo

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Thanks for translating it. It was a interesting story, I like reading about ancient civilizations. They are finding all over the world that there were civilizations as old as the Egyptians or much older. Like Tiahuanaco in Bolivia could be 14,000 years old. Makes me wonder how did they accomplish that with their intelligence levels and the tools they possessed.

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Thanks for translating it. It was a interesting story, I like reading about ancient civilizations. They are finding all over the world that there were civilizations as old as the Egyptians or much older. Like Tiahuanaco in Bolivia could be 14,000 years old. Makes me wonder how did they accomplish that with their intelligence levels and the tools they possessed.

Tiwanaku wasn't 14,000 years old.

The date is based on Posnansky's astro-archeological reconstruction of the site that was in total ruins when he rediscovered it.

He has been proven wrong.

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"Makes me wonder how did they accomplish that with their intelligence levels and the tools they possessed."

Why do you suggest they had a problem with their intelligence levels? They didn't have modern materials technology, which takes time to develop, but that doesn't mean they were any more stupid than people are now! In fact some of their practical skills and possibly their social skills may have been better. They managed to have complex societies, international trade, social stability and to survive and develop the human race without the benefit of having earlier societies or written histories/science to learn from.

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Posted (edited)

Hehe I'm Croatian :). Just wanted to say if in the future u need something translated i'm here :)

And yes it is interesting and i love it when my small country comes up in the "big boys world" :D

Edited by BorisIWantToKnow

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Posted (edited)

Hehe I'm Croatian :). Just wanted to say if in the future u need something translated i'm here :)

And yes it is interesting and i love it when my small country comes up in the "big boys world" :D

Nismo baš tako mali. :tu:

And be my guest next time. You are free to correct those mistakes made by google.

Edited by Melo

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"Makes me wonder how did they accomplish that with their intelligence levels and the tools they possessed."

Why do you suggest they had a problem with their intelligence levels? They didn't have modern materials technology, which takes time to develop, but that doesn't mean they were any more stupid than people are now! In fact some of their practical skills and possibly their social skills may have been better. They managed to have complex societies, international trade, social stability and to survive and develop the human race without the benefit of having earlier societies or written histories/science to learn from.

i agree! also, unless us they were not a rush rush rush group of peoples, it seems back then things took on a more... generational basis of completion.. it if took 5 yrs to do, fine, but if it took 50, that is fine too, if it took more then my life, fine.. my children will complete it.

they thought differently then we do, but were just as smart.

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See who copied from other. :tu:

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Posted (edited)

Sorry.

Edited by Abramelin

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Posted (edited)

No I didnt.

EDIT: You just edit it. :P You are fast.

Edited by Melo

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:tu:

Thanks for the translation, cool story

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Very interesting. A real sunken city.

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Wonderful find

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This issue was so related for me.

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I Live About 30km From The Site :) I Am Soo Proud They Have Discovered Something Of Such Great Importance Where I'm From :D

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Really cool article N...

Since it mentioned that the dwellings were on wooden pilings, could the site have looked similar to this? (larger of course)

Crannog_-_geograph_org_uk_-_35551.jpg

It is a reconstruction of a 'crannog' in Scotland at Loch Tay... The article I got this from stated that at one time these were common all over most of Europe...

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I Live About 30km From The Site :) I Am Soo Proud They Have Discovered Something Of Such Great Importance Where I'm From :D

I thouhgt you are from Kish.

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Really cool article N...

Since it mentioned that the dwellings were on wooden pilings, could the site have looked similar to this? (larger of course)

Crannog_-_geograph_org_uk_-_35551.jpg

It is a reconstruction of a 'crannog' in Scotland at Loch Tay... The article I got this from stated that at one time these were common all over most of Europe...

Thats propbably how it looks like. But we dont need to reconstruct it. Look African Venice.

http://izismile.com/2011/12/06/the_african_venice_35_pics.html

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Anyway that area is very interesting. We have small ziggurats, stone circles and so on.

Later in that area called Istra lived Illrian tribe called Histri.

Here you can see pictures of their ruined(by romans) city Nesactium.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/gallery/thumbs.php?cat=8&p=9

In bottom of the link is Roman arena and Temple of Agustus. Man who dont need introduction. ;)

Anyway Istra is regional part of Croatia, close to Italia and bordering with Slovenia.

It has rich history and many legends and stories. Folks stories with mythological beings.

One of the first Slavic stories about Vampyres came from Istra. But this is far later from 4000 BC...Just want to share it with you.

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Really cool article N...

Since it mentioned that the dwellings were on wooden pilings, could the site have looked similar to this? (larger of course)

Crannog_-_geograph_org_uk_-_35551.jpg

It is a reconstruction of a 'crannog' in Scotland at Loch Tay... The article I got this from stated that at one time these were common all over most of Europe...

Probably, but you have to always think that Europe had many more moors and swamps before rivers were worked on after the middle ages, it could also be that the settlement was in an flooding area or a seasonal water accumulation area (like after the snow melt) and therefore built higher than the probable flood. Construction of that type can still be found in many less "developed" areas around the world where flooding is prevalent.

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I thouhgt you are from Kish.

I'm A Bit From Everywhere ;)

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Very interesting. A real sunken city.

No, a neolithic (stone age) settlement that has been submerged due to rising sea levels over the past 8,000 years. Like many others all around the coasts of Europe (and elsewhere). Not particularly remarkable, but Interesting to archaeologists, obviously.

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Nismo baš tako mali. :tu:

And be my guest next time. You are free to correct those mistakes made by google.

Tek san sad vidio ^^

I will, thank you :yes:

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