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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

It's also worth mentioning that in the kinglist of the Younger Edda, like how Snorri Sturluson presents it in his prologue, is mentioned a Magi as one of Woden's (Odin's) predecessors. Magi was - together with Vidar, Vále and Mode - one of the survivors who gathered on the plain of Idavoll after Ragnarök.

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Lol, Apol. that's the problem with a large thread like this: people will discover the same thing over and over again.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=184645&st=6015

,

Edited by Abramelin

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It's also worth mentioning that in the kinglist of the Younger Edda, like how Snorri Sturluson presents it in his prologue, is mentioned a Magi as one of Woden's (Odin's) predecessors. Magi was - together with Vidar, Vále and Mode - one of the survivors who gathered on the plain of Idavoll after Ragnarök.

This is extremely important, because it would mean that the name Magjari in the OLB has been badly chosen and has nothing to do with the Magyars or Hungary and that it would be just a title, something like king in the Northern countries.

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This is extremely important, because it would mean that the name Magjari in the OLB has been badly chosen and has nothing to do with the Magyars or Hungary and that it would be just a title, something like king in the Northern countries.

Yes, it was certainly a title - it appears as a title in the OLB also, as "the Magí" is mentioned across centuries. It must have been a lot of them in succession.

But I can't see, however, why this name should have been badly chosen - the Magíara was a ruling priestly caste. One part of it may have settled in Hungary as well as another one in Scandinavia.

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Lol, Apol. that's the problem with a large thread like this: people will discover the same thing over and over again.

http://www.unexplain...=184645&st=6015

,

Yes, that's a problem - but you are solving it, as you have been here all the time and remember what has been posted, You're really a living library in that way.

The thread you have linked to is very interesting - I will study it thoroughly in the coming days. Thank you.

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Yes, that's a problem - but you are solving it, as you have been here all the time and remember what has been posted, You're really a living library in that way.

The thread you have linked to is very interesting - I will study it thoroughly in the coming days. Thank you.

I should have added that it wasn't just me saying, "hey, I was first" or something stupid, but that you can read up about it and then we continue the same discussion if there is a need to.

By that we save a lot of repeating old posts; this part -2- of the OLB thread is already growing quite large again.

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This is extremely important, because it would mean that the name Magjari in the OLB has been badly chosen and has nothing to do with the Magyars or Hungary and that it would be just a title, something like king in the Northern countries.

I remember Willem van Haren in his epic poem about Friso used the term "de Mager". That didn't mean 'people who are 'mager' or thin in English, but the Persian 'Magi'

http://www.unexplain...85#entry3768755

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I found something odd:

TANFANG_zps3eafebae.jpg

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

You can read in the Yule circles: WRALDA , T-ANFANG, T-BIJIN.

Or Wralda, The Start/Beginning, The Start/Beginning.

*bi-je-n-n, afries., st. M. (a): nhd. Beginn, Anfang; ne. beginning (N.);

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-B.pdf

I have posted about the first Yule circle (with the letters W-R-A-L-D-A positioned around it) being almost equal to the Biblical "I am the Alpha and the Omega" combined with the Chi-Rho symbol, the Pax Christi symbol, which is often depicted with an apha left and an omega right of the "P", or the Kroder in the OLB.:

http://www.unexplain...20#entry3904889

From the post I linked to:

chi_rho1.jpg

(and notice what I made of the semi-circle of the -P- : a wheelbarrow, or Kroder)

WRALDA-YULE.jpg

But in fact the OLB suggest something like Wralda, the Beginning/Start, and the Beginning/Start.

Kind of odd if you ask me...

I am looking for clues, hints in the OLB.

Someone wanted certain people to receive a message. Fellow Masons, maybe?

.

Edited by Abramelin

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<snip>

From the post I linked to:

chi_rho1.jpg

(and notice what I made of the semi-circle of the -P- : a wheelbarrow, or Kroder)

<snip>

And this is the Little Dipper, a 'heavenly' wheelbarrow:

lildipanim.gif

The Kroder from the OLB carries time around the Yule Wheel.

The Fryans were stargazers, but what did the one(s) writing the OLB mean with all this?

I am convinced we should look for some hidden message in the text, and a cryptographer or a Freemason would be of great help for solving the puzzle.

+++

EDIT:

Cepheus.jpg

cepheus.jpg

The Cassiopeia constellation looks very much like an OLB -W- , and the Cepheus constellation looks like an OLB -A- .

And all circling around Polaris.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Yes, it was certainly a title - it appears as a title in the OLB also, as "the Magí" is mentioned across centuries. It must have been a lot of them in succession.

But I can't see, however, why this name should have been badly chosen - the Magíara was a ruling priestly caste. One part of it may have settled in Hungary as well as another one in Scandinavia.

The genetic and linguistic relationship between the Fins and the Hungarians have been elaborated by the end of the 19th Century. The OLB does not refer to such relationship neither. The Carpathian magyars in Hungary were an isolated group as compared to the finnugrian settlements along the Volga-river up to Finland. So, the word magi may be derived from finnugrian, but is aplied in the northern areas only as you pointed at.

The funny thing is, that Ottema referred to Buda as to Budapest making the magyars originating from Frisian blood, which of course cannot being the case.

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According to "the history of Armenia " the Magi were originally a tribe of the Medes, further down the Volga , to what became Persia.

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The Hungarians may have split from the main Ugric branch in the 1st millenium BC. The word could simply mean 'those who speak' - which in the way it's introduced in the OLB makes perfect sense. The priests spoke, no one else did, the general others were the Magyar Magy-ar - men (people, followers) of those who spoke. They had no other name, until named Finns.

The origin of the "Magyar" expression (the self-definition of the Hungarians) could prove the period when the separation of the proto-Hungarians and the groups speaking proto-Ob-Ugric languages took place, but there are several theories on its origins; the word may be composed of two parts (magy and ar)[1] or it may have been borrowed from a proto-Iranian language.[14]

Words similar to the proposed magy element of the word are also used by the Khanty and Mansi peoples (referring to one of their groups /mos/ or to themselves /mansi/ respectively) which suggest that it is of Ugric origin and it possibly means "those who speak".[1] The assumed ar element of the word may be either of Ugric or Turkic origin and it probably means "man".[1][3] Those who assume that the expression ar originated from a Turkic language, also think that it may refer to a Turkic tribe that joined to a group of the proto-Ugric peoples and thus the two groups formed the Magyar people.

http://en.wikipedia....rian_prehistory

It may be the Magi of Persia and other areas were derived from this group of men priests who had travelled or however joined into other realms, Persia, Chaldea etc rather than being another different priestly caste.

Edited by The Puzzler

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I found something odd:

TANFANG_zps3eafebae.jpg

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/

You can read in the Yule circles: WRALDA , T-ANFANG, T-BIJIN.

Or Wralda, The Start/Beginning, The Start/Beginning.

*bi-je-n-n, afries., st. M. (a): nhd. Beginn, Anfang; ne. beginning (N.);

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-B.pdf

I have posted about the first Yule circle (with the letters W-R-A-L-D-A positioned around it) being almost equal to the Biblical "I am the Alpha and the Omega" combined with the Chi-Rho symbol, the Pax Christi symbol, which is often depicted with an apha left and an omega right of the "P", or the Kroder in the OLB.:

http://www.unexplain...20#entry3904889

From the post I linked to:

chi_rho1.jpg

(and notice what I made of the semi-circle of the -P- : a wheelbarrow, or Kroder)

WRALDA-YULE.jpg

But in fact the OLB suggest something like Wralda, the Beginning/Start, and the Beginning/Start.

Kind of odd if you ask me...

I am looking for clues, hints in the OLB.

Someone wanted certain people to receive a message. Fellow Masons, maybe?

.

Yes, 'Abramelin', that's quite a strange concurrence. One can ask if it is accidental, or not.

I don't believe in your wheelbarrow, though,,,

Edited by Apol

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The genetic and linguistic relationship between the Fins and the Hungarians have been elaborated by the end of the 19th Century. The OLB does not refer to such relationship neither. The Carpathian magyars in Hungary were an isolated group as compared to the finnugrian settlements along the Volga-river up to Finland. So, the word magi may be derived from finnugrian, but is aplied in the northern areas only as you pointed at.

The funny thing is, that Ottema referred to Buda as to Budapest making the magyars originating from Frisian blood, which of course cannot being the case.

Yes, Ottema's placing of Bvda in Budapest is near to ridiculous - Fryasland's core area didn't stretch near to that far. And Overwijn dosn't make the solution any more credible by placing it only a little closer - in České Budějovice (Budweis) in the Czech Republic.

I have made a lot of pondering around where Bvda could have been situated. What I have come up with, is that Bvda may have been the original spelling of Bata, which certainly is a Roman transliteration - placing the burgh of Bvda somewhere in the Batavian area. There are several places up the river (or near to it) from their capital Batavodorum (which may have been either Nijmegen or Wijk bij Duurstede) starting with Büde- and the like; for instance the quarters of Büderich ('Bvda-Reich') in both Meerbusch, Wesel and Werl. Though, their capital or burgh might have been the site of Batavodorum.

Edited by Apol

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Quote from the OLB:

Ther Saxman Storo, Sytjas man, grêvetman ovir-a hâga fenna aend walda. Njvgun wâra is-er to hêrtoga, thaet is to hyrman, kêren. Tha burga Bvda aend Manna-gârda-forda send vnder sin hod.

The Saxman Storo, Sytia’s husband; Grevetman over the high fens and woods. Nine times he was chosen as duke or heerman . The burghs Buda and Manna-garda-forda are under his care.

The High Fens (French: Hautes Fagnes; German: Hohes Venn; Dutch: Hoge Venen), which were declared a nature reserve in 1957, are an upland area, a plateau region in the province of Liège, in the east of Belgium and adjoining parts of Germany, between the Ardennes and the Eifel highlands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Fens

http://www.naturpark...ohesvenn_eifel/

Manna-gârda-forda = Münster

Mimigernaford

http://de.wikipedia....ter_(Westfalen)

Mimigernaford - Mimegardeford. Die ursprünglichen Namen der Stadt Münster

(The original name of the city of Münster)

http://epub.uni-regensburg.de/24584/

Bvda:

It's not just Bvda/Buda, it's the burgh of Buda or the Budaburgh.

It's the place after which the Bodensee is named.

Aus der Völkerwanderungszeit stammt nordöstlich des Dorfes auf halber Bergeshöhe bei der „Bodenburg“ ein alemannisches Reihengräberfeld

From the migration period northeast of the village at half height in the mountains near the "Bodenburg" originates an Alemannic cemetery

http://de.wikipedia....an-Ludwigshafen

http://en.wikipedia..../Lake_Constance

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Quote from the OLB:

Ther Saxman Storo, Sytjas man, grêvetman ovir-a hâga fenna aend walda. Njvgun wâra is-er to hêrtoga, thaet is to hyrman, kêren. Tha burga Bvda aend Manna-gârda-forda send vnder sin hod.

The Saxman Storo, Sytia’s husband; Grevetman over the high fens and woods. Nine times he was chosen as duke or heerman . The burghs Buda and Manna-garda-forda are under his care.

The High Fens (French: Hautes Fagnes; German: Hohes Venn; Dutch: Hoge Venen), which were declared a nature reserve in 1957, are an upland area, a plateau region in the province of Liège, in the east of Belgium and adjoining parts of Germany, between the Ardennes and the Eifel highlands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Fens

http://www.naturpark...ohesvenn_eifel/

Manna-gârda-forda = Münster

Mimigernaford

http://de.wikipedia....ter_(Westfalen)

Mimigernaford - Mimegardeford. Die ursprünglichen Namen der Stadt Münster

(The original name of the city of Münster)

http://epub.uni-regensburg.de/24584/

Bvda:

It's not just Bvda/Buda, it's the burgh of Buda or the Budaburgh.

It's the place after which the Bodensee is named.

Aus der Völkerwanderungszeit stammt nordöstlich des Dorfes auf halber Bergeshöhe bei der „Bodenburg“ ein alemannisches Reihengräberfeld

From the migration period northeast of the village at half height in the mountains near the "Bodenburg" originates an Alemannic cemetery

http://de.wikipedia....an-Ludwigshafen

http://en.wikipedia..../Lake_Constance

.

This is really interesting, 'Abramelin'! You have given me something to study.

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Yes, 'Abramelin', that's quite a strange concurrence. One can ask if it is accidental, or not.

I don't believe in your wheelbarrow, though,,,

You don't believe what exactly about the wheelbarrow?

.

Edited by Abramelin

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This is really interesting, 'Abramelin'! You have given me something to study.

And let's not rule out the Hungarian Buda just yet:

The genetic and linguistic relationship between the Fins and the Hungarians have been elaborated by the end of the 19th Century. The OLB does not refer to such relationship neither. The Carpathian magyars in Hungary were an isolated group as compared to the finnugrian settlements along the Volga-river up to Finland. So, the word magi may be derived from finnugrian, but is aplied in the northern areas only as you pointed at.

The funny thing is, that Ottema referred to Buda as to Budapest making the magyars originating from Frisian blood, which of course cannot being the case.

While Pest was mostly Hungarian in the 15th century, Buda had a German majority. Buda became part of Ottoman ruled central-Hungary from 1541 to 1686. It was known as Budin Eyalet during the Ottoman era. Ottoman Empire settled Serbian settlers in the nearby areas of the city. The original christian citizens (Germans and Hungarians) of the city fled.

In 1686, two years after the unsuccessful siege of Buda, a renewed European campaign was started to enter the erstwhile capital of medieval Hungary. This time, the Holy League's army was twice as large, containing over 74,000 men, including German, Dutch, Hungarian, English, Spanish, Czech, French, Croat, Burgundian, Danish and Swedish soldiers, along with other Europeans as volunteers, artilleryman, and officers, the Christian forces reconquered Buda. (See: Siege of Buda)

After the reconquest of Buda, Bourgeoisie from Southern Germany (Bavaria) moved to the almost deserted city. Germans — also clinging to their language — partly crowded out, partly assimilated the Hungarians and Serbians they have found here. With the rural population moving in the capital city, in the 19th century slowly Hungarians became the majority in Buda too.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buda

++++

EDIT:

The OLB mentions "Tha burga Bvda aend Manna-gârda-forda" or the burghs of Buda and Manna-gârda-forda.

And do the Dutch people still know a "burgh of Buda"? Yes they do:

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burcht_van_Boeda

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buda_Castle

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Yes, Ottema's placing of Bvda in Budapest is near to ridiculous - Fryasland's core area didn't stretch near to that far. And Overwijn dosn't make the solution any more credible by placing it only a little closer - in České Budějovice (Budweis) in the Czech Republic.

I have made a lot of pondering around where Bvda could have been situated. What I have come up with, is that Bvda may have been the original spelling of Bata, which certainly is a Roman transliteration - placing the burgh of Bvda somewhere in the Batavian area. There are several places up the river (or near to it) from their capital Batavodorum (which may have been either Nijmegen or Wijk bij Duurstede) starting with Büde- and the like; for instance the quarters of Büderich ('Bvda-Reich') in both Meerbusch, Wesel and Werl. Though, their capital or burgh might have been the site of Batavodorum.

I can hardly believe that, because the whole of the OLB describes the Celtic time before the Romans. Besides OLB states, that the Saxman [saks] Storo reigned over the haga fenna [Hoge Venen] and walda [Friese Wouden} and took care of Buda [?] and Mannagardaforda [?]. Ottema identified Mannagardaforda as Munster, but I would rather identify it as Munksgaard in Danmark. In that case Buda (Beuten ?) should be in Danmark as well. Both Buda and Mannagardaforda were Frisian setlements beyond the territory of Haga Fenna [Hogeveen in Drente, not in Belgium] and Walda, governed by a Saxman. The Haga Fenna and Walda make me think of the territory south of Groningen.

Edited by Knul

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Here's a new rant, in real OLB style:

About those Magyar/Magi:

We should not forget that the original text of the OLB gives this spelling: Mâgjara In English that would be Magiara.

Their chief was called Magy.

The way the OLB describes these Magiara no way resembles the Hungarian variety.

The Magiara had temples/churches (kaerka) with statues inside them, a high priest (Magy), while the Hungarian Magyar had a shamanistic religion, no temples and no statues.

The Magiar are said to have arrived in Europe 2194-101= 2093 BCE, while the Magyar arrived millennia later.

The next quote (Sandbach's translation, adapted) is also great in creating extra confusion:

The priests are the only rulers; they call themselves Magiara, and their headman Magy. He is high priest and king in one. The rest of the people are of no account, and in subjection to them. This people have not even a name; but we call them Finna,

So they DO have a name, Magiar, but then it is said they DON'T have a name...but that depends on how you read the sentence.

The people are called Finna, but their cast of priests are called Magiar and the head of those priests Magy. This cast of priests carry weapons made from copper, the common people (the Finna) carry stone weapons.

Magi (pron.: /ˈmeɪdʒaɪ/; Latin plural of magus; Ancient Greek: μάγος magos; Old Persian: maguš, Persian: مُغ‎ mogh; English singular magian, mage, magus, magusian, magusaean ; kurdish magi ) is a term, used since at least the 6th century BC, to denote followers of Mazdaism or Zoroaster. The earliest known usage of the word Magi is in the trilingual inscription written by Darius the Great, known as the Behistun Inscription.

Starting later, presumably during the Hellenistic period, the word Magi also denotes followers of what the Hellenistic chroniclers incorrectly associated Zoroaster with, which was – in the main – the ability to read the stars, and manipulate the fate that the stars foretold.[citation needed] However, Old Persian texts, pre-dating the Hellenistic period, refer to a Magus as a Mazdaic, and presumably Zoroastrian, priest.

-

Their influence was also widespread throughout Asia Minor. It is, therefore, quite likely that the sacerdotal caste of the Magi was distinct from the Median tribe of the same name."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magi

Now why would these Finna have priests that called themselves Magiar and a head priest called Magy?

The real Magi were followers of Zoroaster, the founder of Zoroastrianism.

And I think it is another example of creative OLB wordfk: Zoroaster, Zoro Aster... Aster Sea, anyone?

And, as we know, the OLB Aster Sea is the Eastern Sea, the Baltic.

Zoroastrian

1743, from Zoroaster, from Latin Zoroastres, from Old Persian Zarathushtra, 6c. or 7c. B.C.E. Persian religious teacher. The name appears to be literally "whose camels are old," from *zarant "old" (cognate with Greek geron, genitive gerontos "old").

http://www.etymonlin...searchmode=none

Zoroaster's name in his native language, Avestan, was probably Zaraϑuštra. His English name, "Zoroaster", and the derivatives from a later (5th-century BCE) Greek transcription, Zōroastrēs (Ζωροάστρης), as used in Xanthus's Lydiaca (Fragment 32) and in Plato's First Alcibiades (122a1). This form appears subsequently in the Latin Zōroastrēs and, in later Greek orthographies, as Zōroastris. The Greek form of the name appears to be based on a phonetic transliteration or semantic substitution of the Avestan zaraϑ- with the Greek zōros (literally "undiluted") and the Avestan -uštra with astron ("star").

In Avestan, Zaraϑuštra is generally accepted to derive from an Old Iranian *Zaratuštra-. While zarat- is strongly referenced to mean "golden" (from the old Eastern-Iranian zar- [-زر], meaning "gold") it does not itself appear in Avestan.[citation needed] The second half of the name (-uštra-) is universally accepted to mean "camel".[4][a] These factors combined open the door for reconstructing the name's meaning, though there have been other alternative etymologies proposed.

And read the rest here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoroaster

The date of Zoroaster, i.e., the date of composition of the Old Avestan gathas, is unknown. Classical writers such as Plutarch proposed dates prior to 6000 BC. Dates proposed in scholarly literature diverge widely, between the 18th and the 6th centuries BC [10]

10.^ "Controversy over Zaraϑuštra's date has been an embarrassment of long standing to Zoroastrian studies. If anything approaching a consensus exists, it is that he lived no later than 1000 BC, give or take a century or so, though reputable scholars have proposed dates as widely apart as 1750 BCE and '258 years before Alexander.'" (Encyclopedia Iranica)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoroaster

Zarathushtra, known as Zoroaster by the Greeks, lived thousands of years ago on the mountainous steppes of Ancient Iran. Some sources, such as Plato and Socrates, claim Zoroaster lived 6,500 years before the Trojan War. This would place the life of Zoroaster around 7,000 BC. Other datings, based on linguistics, however, place the live of Zarathushtra around the 17th-18th Century BCE, about 3700 years ago.

http://www.zarathush...rathushtra.html

Noruz, the new day in Persian, is the cyclical celebration of the Spring Equinox. Instituted by the Zoroastrians well over 3800 years ago, and it is the most cherished and celebrated of all Iranian festivals; - it has been observed by all peoples of the broad Iranian world for millennia. Noruz commemorates the periodic rebirth and rejuvenation of nature, and has been observed in one form or another by all the major cultures that came in touch with Iranian culture, known as 'Persianate Societies'.

http://www.cais-soas...uz_iranians.htm

but according to the historian Bede the English name "Easter" comes from a pagan celebration by the Germanic tribes of the vernal (spring) equinox.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equinox

;):o:P

.

Edited by Abramelin

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For those who are kind of slow (sorry) : the OLB Magiar are NOT the same as the Hungarian Magyar.

These "Magiar" are no one else but Willem van Haren's "Mager".

People from Persia, that is.

Followers of Zoroaster.

,

Edited by Abramelin

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Why are we slow , that is what i said yesterday ?

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For those who are kind of slow (sorry) : the OLB Magiar are NOT the same as the Hungarian Magyar.

These "Magiar" are no one else but Willem van Haren's "Mager".

People from Persia, that is.

Followers of Zoroaster.

,

That's your opinion only.

Magyars when they moved south mixed with the Andronovo culture. These people have a long history, way prior to any mention of Persian Magi.

In fact, later on in Viking times, the Magyars moved to the area of the Don, where is placed Asaland and where Odin came from, a great centre of sacrifice.

Magyars and Finns mentioned in the OLB, co-incidently both Uralic language speakers and both mentioned as leaders and followers in the OLB and you think there's no connection??

It's not confusing: Magyar are the priests but the head priest is the Magy, the regular people are nobodies, then become Finns.

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Into the time frame of the OLB. These people only settled in Hungary 9th-10th century, they did exist way before that though, moving around various places. they even came into contact with Iranian speakers - hence why I said some of the original Magyars could have became Persian Magi.

The linguistic heritage of the Hungarians comes from Finno-Ugric peoples. A branch of Uralic speakers migrated from their original homeland near the Ural mountains and settled in various places in eastern Europe, until they conquered the present-day area of Hungary between the 9th and 10th centuries. Genetically, the present-day Hungarian population preserves much of an older European genetic makeup.[24][25] In the Middle Ages, according to genetic and palaeoanthropological studies, the majority of Hungarians showed features of European biological descent.[26][27]

Pre-4th century AD

During the 4th millennium BC, the Uralic-speaking peoples who were living in the central and southern regions of the Urals split up. Some dispersed towards the west and northwest and came into contact with Iranian speakers who were spreading northwards.[28] From at least 2000 BC onwards, the Ugrian speakers became distinguished from the rest of the Uralic community. Judging by evidence from burial mounds and settlement sites, they interacted with the Andronovo Culture,[29] furthermore, the type of Hungarians of the Conquest period shows related features to that of the Andronovo people

http://en.wikipedia....ungarian_people

The Magyar in the OLB might not have come from Atland (Aldland) - because of the way the OLB tells it - 2 groups of people came west. Only one need have come from Aldland, and that was the Finns.

The priests in Jessos time are not native to the area. But the priests, who came from another country, traced out these people and had them burnt, so that they do not dare to declare openly their creed. In this country all the priests are fat and rich. In their churches there are all kinds of monstrous images, many of them of gold.

Same priests have the churches and statues.

Interesting that the Yren (Iranians/Persians) fled from the Magy's customs and religion.

To the west of the Punjab are the Yren (Iraniers), or morose (Drangianen), the Gedrosten (Gedrosiers), or runaways, and the Urgetten, or forgotten. These names are given by the priests out of spite, because they fled from their customs and religion. On their arrival our forefathers likewise established themselves to the east of the Punjab, but on account of the priests they likewise went to the west. In that way we learned to know the Yren and other people. The Yren are not savages, but good people, who neither pray to nor tolerate images; neither will they suffer priests or churches; but as we adhere to the light of Fasta, so they everywhere maintain fire in their houses.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magi

Zoroaster is a form of Jesus imo - but the Persians didn't want to worship him the way the Magi wanted them too, I don't think the Magi and the Persians were quite as friendly as history would have us believe. Not forgetting this: "Darius ascended the throne by overthrowing Gaumata, the alleged magus usurper of Bardiya with the assistance of six other Persian noble families; Darius was crowned the following morning." Herodotus reports on it too and they shouldn't be underestimated: " No member of the Achamenid family would rise against Gaumata for the safety of their own life." The Magi came in through the Medean side of the Royal Family as far as I am aware. (Cyrus' mother was a Medean princess) So it would be natural that they would embed themselves in them, but the Persians worshipped the fire and didn't have churches or statues...

(Like Rasputin and Alexandra connection, let's bring in the magic guy even though no one really likes him, trusts him or wants him here.)

The Magi then announce Jesus arrival as a son of God, a good way to start your own religion and have everyone build churches and Jesus idols and give money to you and get rich, those Magi were no dummies, they were 'wise men'. Persia disappeared into oblivion while Christianity told hold all over the world.

The OLB is saying the concept of what Jesus taught is true and he existed but the priests manipulated it and created all this crap that goes with it, when really Jessos was a pure flame, like Zoroaster (and Frya).

Funny enough, the Pope resigns today.

Edited by The Puzzler

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This is extremely important, because it would mean that the name Magjari in the OLB has been badly chosen and has nothing to do with the Magyars or Hungary and that it would be just a title, something like king in the Northern countries.

In Ugric Magy can mean 'those who speak' - Magyar = men of those who speak. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_prehistory

Badly chosen, I don't think so.

Also I just showed the original Hungarian Magyar moved to the Don and Snorri has that area as where Odin came from, not hard to then connect the mention of them by him as being at Ragnorok.

Edited by The Puzzler

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