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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

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"Odin" seems to be derived from "OD":

(page 6, Forma Skédnise)

RING AS HJA RIP WÉRON KRÉJON HJA FRUCHDA AND NOCHTA ANDA DRAMA.

WR.ALDA.S OD TRAD TO RA BINNA.

AND NW BARDON EK TWILIF SVNA AND TWILIF TOGETHERA.

This word is associated to life-force or fertility, as discussed before.

so, originally Odin and Wodin may have been diferent names with different meanings.

Brewer’s Classical Dictionary of Phrase and Fable says:

Odin: Chief god of the Scandinavians. His real name was Siggë, son of Fridulph, but he assumed the name Odin when he left the Tanaïs, because he had been priest of Odin, supreme god of the Scythians.

But Adam of Bremen (Gesta Hammaburgensis, 26) says:

"Wodan id est furor" ("Wodan, which means 'fury'").

The Wikipedia says about the name Odin:

His name is related to ōðr, meaning "fury, excitation," besides "mind," or "poetry."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odin

In the Oera Linda Book you also have:

Wodin, wodander ('furious') 74/6, 104/27, 122/19

Wodin.lik ('like furious') 120/26

Wde ('raged') 3/27

Wodin ('rage', 'fury', 'anger') 85/4

Ōðr is certainly the same word as od in the Oera Linda Book, but I think the noun od and the adjective wodin in the book stem from the same root (Wod/Wodin, Od/Odin).

It simply means a state beside mind, either pleasant or unpleasant.

Edited by Apol

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Lemke is a hamlet which was formerly a municipality in the district of Nienburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemke_(Marklohe)

LEMKE

Origin/meaning:

The arms were granted on September 8, 1967.

The wavy bar in the arms is a canting element, the name supposedly is derived from the words Lem-Beke, where Beke means stream or river. The green field and the trefoil symbolise the agricultural character of the area. The golden colour of the trefoil symbolises the sandy soils.

http://www.ngw.nl/int/dld/l/lemke.htm

Anyone know where this place is situated? Luimpjemakum (2006, p. 177),

Lutkemute sounds good if it's in the right place.

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I found this old post of mine when I looked at the first link Abe gave:

Danish[edit] EtymologyFrom Old Danish ljunken, from Old Norse *ljumka, *lumka ("to warm"), from Proto-Germanic *hlēwanōnan (“to make warm”), *hleumaz, *hlūmaz (“warm”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱal(w)e-, *ḱel(w)e-, *k(')lēw- (“warm, hot”). Cognate with Old Swedish lionkin (“lukewarm”), Old Swedish liumber (“warm, mild, tepid”), Swedish dialectal lumma (“to be hot”), Old Saxon halōian (“to burn”). See lukewarm

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/lunken

mak-ia 70 und häufiger?, mek-k-ia, mait-ia, meit-ia, afries., sw. V. (2): nhd.

machen, reparieren, bauen, festsetzen, gerichtlich entscheiden, freisprechen,

verurteilen, beschuldigen, verklagen, erklären, erweisen, unter etwas bringen,

pfänden; ne. make (V.), repair (V.), build (V.), decide, accuse (V.), declare; Vw.:

s. for-, *lÆk-, ðt-, wi-ther-; Hw.: s. mek; vgl. ae. macian, anfrk. makon, as. makon*,

ahd. mahhæn; Q.: R, B, E, H, W, F, S; E.: germ. *makæn, sw. V., machen, kneten;

idg. *ma-, V., kneten, drücken, streichen, machen, Pokorny 696; W.: nfries.

maaikjen, V., machen; L.: Hh 68b, Rh 914b

warm - make = maybe a fire works of some kind..? iron works, heating of some kind. Hot spa pools, I dunno but it will relate to these words imo.

The place might not even be there now, it should be in East Flyland.

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Lemke is a hamlet which was formerly a municipality in the district of Nienburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany

http://en.wikipedia....Lemke_(Marklohe)

LEMKE

Origin/meaning:

The arms were granted on September 8, 1967.

The wavy bar in the arms is a canting element, the name supposedly is derived from the words Lem-Beke, where Beke means stream or river. The green field and the trefoil symbolise the agricultural character of the area. The golden colour of the trefoil symbolises the sandy soils.

http://www.ngw.nl/int/dld/l/lemke.htm

Anyone know where this place is situated? Luimpjemakum (2006, p. 177),

Lutkemute sounds good if it's in the right place.

Luimpjemakum is not a real place, but just what turns up in Goffe Jensma's head when he reads the word Lumkamâkja.

He says that Lumkamâkja therefore is "an idiotic phantasy name", and that the closest association it gives might be "to create a good mood".

Lutkemute might be in a very right place,

but whether the etymology of Lutkemute ('Little River Mouth') correspond to an etymological explanation for Lumkamâkja, is another question.

The Old Norse word lumka you have given, is interesting. I'll study it. Moreover, 'lukewarm' is lunken in modern Norwegian, and to 'make lukewarm' is lunke. The Old Swedish liumber is in Norwegian lummer, which we use for a type of weather that feels warm and moist in an unpleasant way.

Edited by Apol

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Here a fragment of that map (the NW part), on which archaeologic finds of neolithic settlements are denoted (the white starts).

wfarch1.jpg

And here the finds of flint sickels from the late bronze age:

wfarch8.jpg

Compare to finds in the rest of the NL:

wfarch10.jpg

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It simply means a state beside mind, either pleasant or unpleasant.

I don't think it's that simple.

Oldsaxon dictionary (http://koeblergerhard.de/altsaechsisch-gesamtdatei.doc):

ô‑d* 3, as., st. N. (a): nhd. Gut, Besitz, Grundbesitz, Glück; ne. wealth (N.); ÜG.: lat. divitiae SPs; Vw.: s. up‑*, ‑welo*; Hw.: s. *alud; vgl. ahd. æt* (1) (st. M. a?, st. N. a); Q.: H (830), SPs, ON, PN; E.: germ. *auda‑, *audaz, st. M. (a), Gut, Glück, Habe; idg. *audh‑, Sb., Glück, Besitz, Reichtum, Pokorny 76; s. idg. *aø‑ (5), *aøÐ‑, V., flechten, weben, Pokorny 75?; B.: H Gen. Sg. odes 2112 M C, 1099 M, 3142 M, odas 1099 C, oºes 3142 C, SPs Nom. Pl. adas divitiae Ps. 111/3 = Tiefenbach Ps. 111/3 = SAAT 324, 26 (Ps. 111/3); Kont.: H uuonotsaman uuelon endi uueroldrîki endi all sulic ôdes sô thius erºa bihaªad 1099; Son.: Behaghel, O., Die Syntax des Heliand, 1897, S. 7, 116, Wortschatz der germanischen Spracheinheit, unter Mitw. v. Falk, H., gänzlich umgearb. v. Torp, A., 4. A., 1909, S. 6, Berr, S., An Etymological Glossary to the Old Saxon Heliand, 1971, 305, Lagenpusch, E., Das germanische Recht im Heliand, 1894, S. 32, Vilmar, A., Deutsche Altertümer im Heliand, 1845, S. 41, 42

The dutch word for stork ("ooievaar") would have been derived from it (through "odevaar"), and probably also "ooi" (female sheep), both words being associated to fertility. The fertility or life-force meaning makes sense in the context of the only OLB fragment in which the word is used (creation myth, page 6).

According to Jensma (2004) it is the most-discussed word of the OLB.

Ottema and Over de Linden had a very different opinion about its meaning.

The origin of life is a mysterious thing. I think it makes a hell of a difference whether one believes life originates from hate, or from something that sounds more positive like fertility or life-force (chi, prana, orgone???).

Fragment of letter from Cornelis Over de Linden to Dr. Ottema, dated 8-11-1871 (translated).

You want to replace the word 'od' with 'animosity'. On page 128 I find FIAND for enemy. I would rather see you use 'fertilising force' - or a more appropriate term. The word animosity will cause animosity. [Ottema would later change 'animosity' in 'hatred'.] When one speaks to youths about love, they will fall in love. But when one speaks to them of war, they will seperate in groups and play soldier, to the great pleasure of despotism.

Ottema to L.F. Over de Linden, the son of Cornelis (translated from letter in Dutch dated 26-1-1876):

"Od (anger, rage, hate, animosity) trad to-ra binna, means that hate entered the hearts of the three daughters of Irtha; this hate was obviously inherited by all of their descendants, and this is cause of the inborn, innate animosity specially in Finda's and Lyda's posterity against Frya's children. An animosity that will not end until the people of Finda and Lyda will be exterminated, and the people of Frya at the final victory will remain and inherit and posess the whole earth.

This animosity dominates all of history in the OLB and still goes on in our days. Frya's people pervade in all continents and establish European supremacy all over the earth. Everywhere the peoples of Finda and Lyda will have to submit or disappear."

Source of both fragments: http://fryskednis.blogspot.nl/2012_02_01_archive.html

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Luimpjemakum is not a real place, but just what turns up in Goffe Jensma's head when he reads the word Lumkamâkja.

He says that Lumkamâkja therefore is "an idiotic phantasy name", and that the closest association it gives might be "to create a good mood".

Lutkemute might be in a very right place,

but whether the etymology of Lutkemute ('Little River Mouth') correspond to an etymological explanation for Lumkamâkja, is another question.

The Old Norse word lumka you have given, is interesting. I'll study it. Moreover, 'lukewarm' is lunken in modern Norwegian, and to 'make lukewarm' is lunke. The Old Swedish liumber is in Norwegian lummer, which we use for a type of weather that feels warm and moist in an unpleasant way.

I don't think Lumkamakja was a phantasy name. That's the easiest solution, if one cannot cope with an identification problem.

As is indicated in the OLB the word consists of two parts Lumka - makja. So let us treat the two parts separately.

We know about a person Jan van Lemego. He wrote the history of Groningen, which was completed by Sicke Benninge. The name Lemego is also spelled Lemmego, Lemmege, Lemmige, Lemigge and Lemmigo.

I understand, that Lumka < Lumeka < Lumega < Lumego < Lemego may indicate a reasonable linguistic relationship. So I would interpret the first part Lumka = Lemego.

Lemego may be the alternative name of Eemsgo.

The second part makja = maken or magen. k may change to g, ch as in Aken-Aachen. We find this magen or megen in many places like Nymagen, Nymegen. Originally magen, megen means market place.

So I would interpret Lumkamaja as marketplace of Lemego, which is Embden.

Titel De Kroniek Van Sicke Benninge, 1e en 2e Deel: Kroniek Van Van Lemego [with Additions by S. Benninge] Uigegeven en Met Kritische Aanteekeningen Voorzien Door J.A. Feith, Met Eene Inleiding Van P.J. Blok Auteur Jan van LEMEGO gepubliceerd 1887

Edited by Knul

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From the OLB:

Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us.

Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumka-makia, near the Ee-mude, in East-flyland, with his parents.

(...)

Tha stjurar gvngon thâ nêi tha Dênnemarka fâra, thêr nâmon hja Wodin mith sin wigandlika landwêr in.

The navy then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his brave militia.

So Wodin lived with his parents in Lumka-makia, East-Flyland, near the Ee-mude, and the navy/sailors took him on board in Denmark.

Nowhere in the OLB does it say Wodin had moved from his parents' home to Denmark, so what does this mean?

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From the OLB:

Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê-mude to Ast-flyland by sin eldrum t-us.

Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumka-makia, near the Ee-mude, in East-flyland, with his parents.

(...)

Tha stjurar gvngon thâ nêi tha Dênnemarka fâra, thêr nâmon hja Wodin mith sin wigandlika landwêr in.

The navy then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his brave militia.

So Wodin lived with his parents in Lumka-makia, East-Flyland, near the Ee-mude, and the navy/sailors took him on board in Denmark.

Nowhere in the OLB does it say Wodin had moved from his parents' home to Denmark, so what does this mean?

The answer is given in the next lines. Wodin was hertog. So he moved with his land army to Denmark. His brothers were sekaninga. So they moved on sea to Denmark. To get to Schoonland Wodin's army had to be fared by the fleets of his brothers. In Schoonland they conquered the Fins and Magyars.

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The answer is given in the next lines. Wodin was hertog. So he moved with his land army to Denmark. His brothers were sekaninga. So they moved on sea to Denmark. To get to Schoonland Wodin's army had to be fared by the fleets of his brothers. In Schoonland they conquered the Fins and Magyars.

Can you post a quote? Because I don't read that in the text.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#aw

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Can you post a quote? Because I don't read that in the text.

http://oeralinda.angelfire.com/#aw

.

Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê‑mude to Ast‑flyland by sin eldrum t‑us . Ênes was er hêrman wêst . Tünis aend Inka wêron sêkaempar aend just nw bi hjara faederja anda Alder-gâ‑mude t‑vs . 14. As tha jonga kaempar nw bi ekkôrum kêmon , kêron hja Wodin to hjara hêrman jefta kaening ut , aend tha sê-kaempar kêron Tünis to‑ra sê-kaening aend Inka to hjara skelta-bî-thêr nacht . Tha stjurar gvngon thâ nêi tha Dênna-marka fâra , thêr nâmon hja Wodin mith sin wigand-lika landwêr in . Wînd was rum aend alsa wêron hja an en âmerîng to Skênland . Thâ tha northeska brothar ra selva by‑m fogath hêde , dêlde Wodîn sin weldich hêr an thri wiga . Frya was hjara wêpenhrop aend sâ hi baekward sloch tha Finnen aend Mâgjara as of et baern wêron .

So Wodin, Tunis and Inka were in Aldergamude. From there they left to Denmark, Wodin with his land army and Tunis and Inka by sea. In Denmark Tunis and Inka took the army of Wodin in till Skenland. In Skenland they fought with the Finns and Magjars.

Edited by Knul

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Wodin thene aldeste hêmde to Lumka-mâkja bi thêre Ê‑mude to Ast‑flyland by sin eldrum t‑us . Ênes was er hêrman wêst . Tünis aend Inka wêron sêkaempar aend just nw bi hjara faederja anda Alder-gâ‑mude t‑vs . 14. As tha jonga kaempar nw bi ekkôrum kêmon , kêron hja Wodin to hjara hêrman jefta kaening ut , aend tha sê-kaempar kêron Tünis to‑ra sê-kaening aend Inka to hjara skelta-bî-thêr nacht . Tha stjurar gvngon thâ nêi tha Dênna-marka fâra , thêr nâmon hja Wodin mith sin wigand-lika landwêr in . Wînd was rum aend alsa wêron hja an en âmerîng to Skênland . Thâ tha northeska brothar ra selva by‑m fogath hêde , dêlde Wodîn sin weldich hêr an thri wiga . Frya was hjara wêpenhrop aend sâ hi baekward sloch tha Finnen aend Mâgjara as of et baern wêron .

So Wodin, Tunis and Inka were in Aldergamude. From there they left to Denmark, Wodin with his land army and Tunis and Inka by sea. In Denmark Tunis and Inka took the army of Wodin in till Skenland. In Skenland they fought with the Finns and Magjars.

Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumka-makia, near the Ee-mude, in East-flyland, with his parents. He had once commanded troops. Teunis and Inka were sea warriors, and were just then staying with their father at the Alderga-mude. When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy/sailors then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his brave militia.

The wind was fair, so they arrived immediately in Schoonland. When the northern brothers met together, Wodin divided his powerful army into three bodies. Frya was their war-cry, and they drove back the Finns and Magyars like children.

Now you say, "So Wodin, Tunis and Inka were in Aldergamude", but Wodin was NOT: he was either in Lumka-makia or in Denmark.

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Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumka-makia, near the Ee-mude, in East-flyland, with his parents. He had once commanded troops. Teunis and Inka were sea warriors, and were just then staying with their father at the Alderga-mude. When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy/sailors then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his brave militia.

The wind was fair, so they arrived immediately in Schoonland. When the northern brothers met together, Wodin divided his powerful army into three bodies. Frya was their war-cry, and they drove back the Finns and Magyars like children.

Now you say, "So Wodin, Tunis and Inka were in Aldergamude", but Wodin was NOT: he was either in Lumka-makia or in Denmark.

When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. Just tell me where they assembled together.

Edited by Knul

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When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. Just tell me where they assembled together.

Don't know, but after they chose Wodin to be their leader, they went to pick him up in Denmark.

It looks like those 'young warriors' were Teunis and Inka in Aldergamude.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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The name in german "auf deustch" for Wednesday ist "Wodenstag". I believe that was named after Wodin? "Woden's day". At least that's what I remember learning.

Edited by SSilhouette

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Don't know, but after they chose Wodin to be their leader, they went to pick him up in Denmark.

It looks like those 'young warriors' were Teunis and Inka in Aldergamude.

.

young warriors meaning the three nephews of Sterik, isn't it ?

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young warriors meaning the three nephews of Sterik, isn't it ?

Of course not: Wodin wasn't present. And you think he voted for himself to be the leader of the campaign?

Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumka-makia, near the Ee-mude, in East-flyland, with his parents. He had once commanded troops. Teunis and Inka were sea warriors, and were just then staying with their father at the Alderga-mude. When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy/sailors then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his brave militia.

The wind was fair, so they arrived immediately in Schoonland. When the northern brothers met together, Wodin divided his powerful army into three bodies. Frya was their war-cry, and they drove back the Finns and Magyars like children.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Of course not: Wodin wasn't present. And you think he voted for himself to be the leader of the campaign?

Wodin, the eldest, lived at Lumka-makia, near the Ee-mude, in East-flyland, with his parents. He had once commanded troops. Teunis and Inka were sea warriors, and were just then staying with their father at the Alderga-mude. When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy/sailors then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his brave militia.

The wind was fair, so they arrived immediately in Schoonland. When the northern brothers met together, Wodin divided his powerful army into three bodies. Frya was their war-cry, and they drove back the Finns and Magyars like children.

.

I also had problems with this passage for a while.

Sandbach:

When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his valiant host.

I think what causes the problem is that Sandbach has left out a word.

My translation:

When the young warriors now came together, they chose Wodin to their army-leader or king; and the sea-warriors chose Tünis to their sea-king and Inka to their rear admiral. The steersmen then went before to Dênnamarka – there they took in [on board] Wodin with his brave land-defence.

The Oera Linda Book:

As ða jonga kæmpar nw bi ekkorum kêmon kêron hja Wodin to hjara hêr.man jefta kæning ut. ænd ða sê.kæmpar kêron Tünis to.ra sê.kæning ænd Inka to hjara skelta bi ðêr nacht. ða stjurar gvngon ðâ nêi ða Dênna.marka fâra. ðêr nâmon hja Wodin mið sin wigandlika land.wêr in.

Like 'Knul' said: Tünis and Inka went by sea to Dênnamarka and waited for Wodin and his milits there. Wodin went by land - it took a little longer time.

When they arrived, Tünis and Inka took them on board.

Edited by Apol

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Because the Frisians owned the Rhine and adjacent land, but this ownership did not belong to one grieteny in particular, but to all of the grietenies together. Similarly the colonies in Denmark, England and in the Mediterranean belonged to the Frisian state (so to say).

MS47-49: 4. . Tha owira thissar rin strama wrdon tomet algadur thrvch vs folk bisêton , ak tha fjelda an thju Rêne fon t êna enda alon et ôre ende thâ .

You may be right in some way or another. Maybe the Rhine was less governed before New Freyjasburgh was established and Apollânja went there.

The Büde-, Bude-, Bode- etc. place-names along the Rhine were certainly not applied before the 'Bvdavians' (Batavians) controlled the Rhine around 50 BC anyway.

At that time the patriarchal law had started to rule. There was no Folk-mother any longer to avoid fragmentation.

I've made a new map for you:

nederland5hoXII_zpsfecfcc31.jpg

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So I would interpret Lumkamaja as marketplace of Lemego, which is Embden.

OK, good, that might be it.

Edited by The Puzzler

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The name in german "auf deustch" for Wednesday ist "Wodenstag". I believe that was named after Wodin? "Woden's day". At least that's what I remember learning.

Yes, as far as I know, that's the story, Wednesday is Wodin's Day.

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You may be right in some way or another. Maybe the Rhine was less governed before New Freyjasburgh was established and Apollânja went there.

The Büde-, Bude-, Bode- etc. place-names along the Rhine were certainly not applied before the 'Bvdavians' (Batavians) controlled the Rhine around 50 BC anyway.

At that time the patriarchal law had started to rule. There was no Folk-mother any longer to avoid fragmentation.

I've made a new map for you:

nederland5hoXII_zpsfecfcc31.jpg

Thanks for the new map. In fact the OLB contains four different geographies:

1. before the catastrophe of 2193 v.C. - greatest expansion (Baltic cea - Westland)

2. after the catastrophe of 2193 v.C. - lost territory to the Magy and Gauls

3. Celtic time ca. 600 - 300 (Adela, Apollonja, etc.). - Sea and trade oriented

4. After the settlement of Friso (300-Roman time) - Saxony and politics oriented

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I also had problems with this passage for a while.

Sandbach:

When the young warriors had assembled together, they chose Wodin to be their leader or king, and the naval force chose Teunis for their sea-king and Inka for their admiral. The navy then sailed to Denmark, where they took on board Wodin and his valiant host.

I think what causes the problem is that Sandbach has left out a word.

My translation:

When the young warriors now came together, they chose Wodin to their army-leader or king; and the sea-warriors chose Tünis to their sea-king and Inka to their rear admiral. The steersmen then went before to Dênnamarka – there they took in [on board] Wodin with his brave land-defence.

The Oera Linda Book:

As ða jonga kæmpar nw bi ekkorum kêmon kêron hja Wodin to hjara hêr.man jefta kæning ut. ænd ða sê.kæmpar kêron Tünis to.ra sê.kæning ænd Inka to hjara skelta bi ðêr nacht. ða stjurar gvngon ðâ nêi ða Dênna.marka fâra. ðêr nâmon hja Wodin mið sin wigandlika land.wêr in.

Like 'Knul' said: Tünis and Inka went by sea to Dênnamarka and waited for Wodin and his milits there. Wodin went by land - it took a little longer time.

When they arrived, Tünis and Inka took them on board.

Sandbach didn't leave out a word: "fâra." is not "before, but English "fare", sail or Dutch varen".

OLB: ða stjurar gvngon ðâ nêi ða Dênna.marka fâra

Dutch: de sturers gingen dan naa de Denemarken varen

English: the sailers/navy then went on sailing to Denmark

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So I would interpret Lumkamaja as marketplace of Lemego, which is Embden.

Lemgo is a city in the Lippe district of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, with a population of c. 42,000.

It was founded in the 12th century by Bernhard II at the crossroad of two merchant routes. Lemgo was a member of the Hanseatic League, a medieval trading association of free cities in several northern European countries such as The Netherlands, Germany and Poland. In Lemgo the Ostwestfalen-Lippe University is situated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemgo

(For those who can read German, here's a lot more info on Lemgo: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemgo

Das Gebiet, in dem die heutige Stadt Lemgo liegt, wurde Anfang des 11. Jahrhunderts Limgauwe oder Limga )

Lemgo (Lemego), Archidiakonat>P: Vizearchidiakon: Drosten gen. Schoteler

- Stadt 59-60, 77-78, 190, 209, 213,>P: Backhaus, Becker, Bentenberg, Hurch, Stertfedde, Tiderici

http://www.lwl.org/hiko-download/Ortsnamenindex_Fraterhaus.pdf

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=184645&st=6525#entry4081443

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Sandbach didn't leave out a word: "fâra." is not "before, but English "fare", sail or Dutch varen".

OLB: ða stjurar gvngon ðâ nêi ða Dênna.marka fâra

Dutch: de sturers gingen dan naa de Denemarken varen

English: the sailers/navy then went on sailing to Denmark

I don't think so - the verbum in the sentence is gvngon. In Norwegian we would say: "Sjømennene dro så føre til Dênnemarka".

I think it is about the word be-fore (fore like in foresee). Then the meaning will also come into place.

Edited by Apol

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