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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 2]

6,100 posts in this topic

I don't think so - the verbum in the sentence is gvngon. In Norwegian we would say: "Sjømennene dro så føre til Dênnemarka".

I think it is about the word be-fore (fore like in foresee). Then the meaning will also come into place.

But as the word order in the OLB is exactly the same as in modern and 19th century Dutch, fâra is nothing else but (EN) 'fare' (like in farewell = fare well, in Dutch 'vaarwel', or something like 'have a safe journey').

+++

EDIT:

bi-for-a* (1) 13?, bi-for-e* (1), bi-for-i* (1), bi-for* (1), afries., Präp.: nhd. vor,

für; ne. before (Präp.); Vw.: s. -wor-d-a; Hw.: vgl. ae. beforan (1), as. biforan, ahd.

bifora;

http://www.koeblergerhard.de/germanistischewoerterbuecher/altfriesischeswoerterbuch/afries-B.pdf

far-a (1) 80 und häufiger?, afries., st. V. (6): nhd. fahren, ziehen, gehen, reisen,

verfahren (V.), angreifen, überziehen; ne. go (V.), travel (V.), attack (V.);

http://www.koeblergerhard.de/germanistischewoerterbuecher/altfriesischeswoerterbuch/afries-F.pdf

.

Edited by Abramelin

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But as the word order in the OLB is exactly the same as in modern and 19th century Dutch, fâra is nothing else but (EN) 'fare' (like in farewell = fare well, in Dutch 'vaarwel', or something like 'have a safe journey').

+++

EDIT:

bi-for-a* (1) 13?, bi-for-e* (1), bi-for-i* (1), bi-for* (1), afries., Präp.: nhd. vor,

für; ne. before (Präp.); Vw.: s. -wor-d-a; Hw.: vgl. ae. beforan (1), as. biforan, ahd.

bifora;

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-B.pdf

far-a (1) 80 und häufiger?, afries., st. V. (6): nhd. fahren, ziehen, gehen, reisen,

verfahren (V.), angreifen, überziehen; ne. go (V.), travel (V.), attack (V.);

http://www.koeblerge...ch/afries-F.pdf

.

I certainly agree with Abramelin. fara = varen is the infinitive.

Edited by Knul

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Lemgo is a city in the Lippe district of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, with a population of c. 42,000.

It was founded in the 12th century by Bernhard II at the crossroad of two merchant routes. Lemgo was a member of the Hanseatic League, a medieval trading association of free cities in several northern European countries such as The Netherlands, Germany and Poland. In Lemgo the Ostwestfalen-Lippe University is situated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemgo

(For those who can read German, here's a lot more info on Lemgo: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemgo

Das Gebiet, in dem die heutige Stadt Lemgo liegt, wurde Anfang des 11. Jahrhunderts Limgauwe oder Limga )

Lemgo (Lemego), Archidiakonat>P: Vizearchidiakon: Drosten gen. Schoteler

- Stadt 59-60, 77-78, 190, 209, 213,>P: Backhaus, Becker, Bentenberg, Hurch, Stertfedde, Tiderici

http://www.lwl.org/h..._Fraterhaus.pdf

http://www.unexplain...25#entry4081443

Could be, but Johann van Lemego is described as a burgher of Groningen and he wrote a history of Groningen.

Lemego, Johan van (308 words)

Justine Smithuis

Lemego, Johan van

fl. 1422-7. Low Countries. Burgher of Groningen (Northern Netherlands) mentioned as member of the brewers' guild in 1424. Author of a Dutch-language chronicle of the town of Groningen and its surrounding Frisian areas (Ommelanden) and as such the first known lay historian of this town.

This chronicle is relevant mostly for its description of the years 1397-1421, which must have been based on the author's own experience and reports of contemporaries. Johan's main interest lies in the party struggles in the Norther…

Citation

Justine Smithuis. "Lemego, Johan van." Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle. Brill Online, 2013. Reference. 19 March 2013 <http://www.paulyonline.brill.nl/entries/encyclopedia-of-the-medieval-chronicle/lemego-johan-van-SIM_01488>

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"Al die willen te kaap'ren varen" is an old Dutch/Flemish folksong.

http://nl.wikipedia....p'ren_varen

[media=]

[/media]

All who want to sail,

Have to be men with beards.

John, Pete, Joris and Cornell,

They have beards,

They have beards.

John, Pete, Joris and Cornell,

They have beards, so they are on board!

The verbum here is "willen" (want). "Varen" (to sail, fare) comes at the end.

"Kaap'ren" is 'capes' (like in Cape of Good Hope, or Cape Horn), but also 'kapen' or 'kaperen', piracy, to loot.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Could be, but Johann van Lemego is described as a burgher of Groningen and he wrote a history of Groningen.

Lemego, Johan van (308 words)

Justine Smithuis

Lemego, Johan van

fl. 1422-7. Low Countries. Burgher of Groningen (Northern Netherlands) mentioned as member of the brewers' guild in 1424. Author of a Dutch-language chronicle of the town of Groningen and its surrounding Frisian areas (Ommelanden) and as such the first known lay historian of this town.

This chronicle is relevant mostly for its description of the years 1397-1421, which must have been based on the author's own experience and reports of contemporaries. Johan's main interest lies in the party struggles in the Norther…

Citation

Justine Smithuis. "Lemego, Johan van." Encyclopedia of the Medieval Chronicle. Brill Online, 2013. Reference. 19 March 2013 <http://www.paulyonline.brill.nl/entries/encyclopedia-of-the-medieval-chronicle/lemego-johan-van-SIM_01488>

If you click on the link in that post of mine, and scroll down, you'll see your post where you agree with me. But that was in 2011...

I once had a colleague called "E. van Leipsig".. but she didn't come from Leipzig (Germany). Her familie had lived in the Netherlands for ages.

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I don't think so - the verbum in the sentence is gvngon. In Norwegian we would say: "Sjømennene dro så føre til Dênnemarka".

I think it is about the word be-fore (fore like in foresee). Then the meaning will also come into place.

I hope you understand, that the OLB text is a word-for-word translation from a 19th c. Dutch or Frisian text to some sort of Old Frisian using a simplified grammar.

Here is an example:

As [Als] tha [de] bêda [beide] nêva [neven] -t-[het] althus [aldus] navt [niet] ênes [eens (1)] wrde [worden] koste [konden], gvng [ging] Tünis [Teunis] to [toe] aend [en] stek [stak] en[een] râde [rode] fône [vaan, vlag] in [in] -t [het] strând [strand], aend [en] Inka [inka] êne [een] blâwe [blauwe]. Thêr [Daar] aefter [na] macht [mocht] jahwêder [een ieder (2)] kjasa [kiezen], hwam [wie] ek [elk, vergelijk hierna ekkorum = elkaar] folgja [volgen] wilde [wilde], aend [en] wonder [wonder], by [bij] Inka [inka] thêr [die, ook: daar] en [een] gryns (3) [weerzin] hêde [had] vmbe [omme] tha [de] kaeningar [koningen] fon [van] Findas [Finda’s] folk [volk] to [te] thjanja [dienen], hlipon [liepen] tha [de] mâsta [meeste] Finna [Finnen] aend [en] Mâgjara [Magyaren] ovir [over]. As [Als] hja [zij] nw [nu] thaet [dat, het] folk [volk] tellath [(ge)teld] aend [en] tha [de] skêpa [schepen] thêr [daar] nêi [na, naar] dêlath [(ver)deeld] hêde [hadden], tha [dan] skêdon [scheidden] tha [de] flâta [vloten] fon [van] ekkorum [elkaar, zie ek = elk]; fon [van] nêf [neef] Tünis [Teunis] is [is] aefternêi [nadien, daarna] tâl [= taal of teken] kêmen [(ge)komen], fon [van] nêf [neef] Inka [inka] ninmer [= nin mer = niet een, geen (taal of teken) meer].

(1) Ênes wordt ook als ênis geschreven en ook omgezet in ynes in de betekenis van eens = op een dag, behandeld als een (oude) negatief zoals thes nachtis = 's nachts, thes mornes = 's morgens, thes middeis = 's middags, thes ewendes = 's avonds, deis = daags, allerweikes = allerweegs, vrmites = vermits, unenes = oneens, jahwelikes = jewelks, jerlikes, jerlikis = jaarlijks, enz. Bijzonder: nachtis and untidis = bij nacht en ontij, zelfs: unmenis = onmens en aefterbaekis = achterbaks.

(2) jahwêder = jeweder = eenieder, in Sachsenspiegel, Sachsische Landrecht

(3) gryns vgl. grijnsaard = knorrepot (ca. 1864), d.i. met tegenzin doen.

Edited by Knul

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I hope you understand, that the OLB text is a word-for-word translation from a 19th c. Dutch or Frisian text to some sort of Old Frisian using a simplified grammar.

And I agree with you.

Isn't it "amazing" (NOT) that we Dutch can read the OLB like it was written in our own language? OK, some words we have to look up in an Old Frisian dictionary, but the word order is 100 % similar to our modern Dutch or to 19th century Dutch.

And any scrap of early medieval Germanic text we have is always in a different word order.

I won't believe for a second that we Dutch speak a 2600 years old language.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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If you click on the link in that post of mine, and scroll down, you'll see your post where you agree with me. But that was in 2011...

I once had a colleague called "E. van Leipsig".. but she didn't come from Leipzig (Germany). Her familie had lived in the Netherlands for ages.

I said: could be. I have not found Lemego between the Frisian lands, though the ending -go or -ga is typical Frisian like Alder-ga. I don't think Wodin lived with his parents in Lemgo, but in the E-muthon area. My analysis of Lumkamakja was purely linguistic. Personally I have not yet left the idea about Helgoland. OLB tells us, that Wodan has been transformed to a god.

Edited by Knul

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I said: could be. I have not found Lemego between the Frisian lands, though the ending -go or -ga is typical Frisian like Alder-ga. I don't think Wodin lived with his parents in Lemgo, but in the E-muthon area. My analysis of Lumkamakja was purely linguistic. Personally I have not yet left the idea about Helgoland.

OK, then Lemego has nothing to do with Emden or Lumka-makia.

And that was what I was trying to point out to you.

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Word order (modern Dutch and the OLB language):

Okke min svn.

-1- Thissa boka mot i mith lif aend sêle wârja.

-2- Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk, âk fon vsa êthlum.

-3- Vrlêden jêr haeb ik tham ut-er flod hred tolik mith thi aend thinra moder.

-4- Tha hja wêron wet wrden; thêr thrvch gvngon hja aefternei vrdarva.

Okke, mijn zoon

-1- Deze boeken moet je met lijf ende ziel (be)waren.

-2- Ze omvatten die (ge)schiedenis van ons hele volk, ook van onze ouderen.

-3- Verleden jaar heb ik ze (EN: "them") uit'r vloed (ge)red te(ge)lijk met jou (GER: Du/Dich) ende jouw (GER: deine) moeder.

-4- Daa(r ) zij waren nat (EN: wet) (ge)worden; daar door gingen zij daarna ("achterna") verderven (modern Dutch: BEderven).

.

Edited by Abramelin

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I said: could be. I have not found Lemego between the Frisian lands, though the ending -go or -ga is typical Frisian like Alder-ga. I don't think Wodin lived with his parents in Lemgo, but in the E-muthon area. My analysis of Lumkamakja was purely linguistic. Personally I have not yet left the idea about Helgoland. OLB tells us, that Wodan has been transformed to a god.

But Odin/Wodin/Wodan was not the 'god' venerated on Helgoland.

It was Fo(r )seti.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forseti

.

Edited by Abramelin

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And I agree with you.

Isn't it "amazing" (NOT) that we Dutch can read the OLB like it was written in our own language? OK, some words we have to look up in an Old Frisian dictionary, but the word order is 100 % similar to our modern Dutch or to 19th century Dutch.

And any scrap of early medieval Germanic text we have is always in a different word order.

I won't believe for a second that we Dutch speak a 2600 years old language.

.

whereas our most ancient writings are as easy to read as those that were written yesterday.

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I hope you understand, that the OLB text is a word-for-word translation from a 19th c. Dutch or Frisian text to some sort of Old Frisian using a simplified grammar.

Here is an example:

As [Als] tha [de] bêda [beide] nêva [neven] -t-[het] althus [aldus] navt [niet] ênes [eens (1)] wrde [worden] koste [konden], gvng [ging] Tünis [Teunis] to [toe] aend [en] stek [stak] en[een] râde [rode] fône [vaan, vlag] in [in] -t [het] strând [strand], aend [en] Inka [inka] êne [een] blâwe [blauwe]. Thêr [Daar] aefter [na] macht [mocht] jahwêder [een ieder (2)] kjasa [kiezen], hwam [wie] ek [elk, vergelijk hierna ekkorum = elkaar] folgja [volgen] wilde [wilde], aend [en] wonder [wonder], by [bij] Inka [inka] thêr [die, ook: daar] en [een] gryns (3) [weerzin] hêde [had] vmbe [omme] tha [de] kaeningar [koningen] fon [van] Findas [Finda’s] folk [volk] to [te] thjanja [dienen], hlipon [liepen] tha [de] mâsta [meeste] Finna [Finnen] aend [en] Mâgjara [Magyaren] ovir [over]. As [Als] hja [zij] nw [nu] thaet [dat, het] folk [volk] tellath [(ge)teld] aend [en] tha [de] skêpa [schepen] thêr [daar] nêi [na, naar] dêlath [(ver)deeld] hêde [hadden], tha [dan] skêdon [scheidden] tha [de] flâta [vloten] fon [van] ekkorum [elkaar, zie ek = elk]; fon [van] nêf [neef] Tünis [Teunis] is [is] aefternêi [nadien, daarna] tâl [= taal of teken] kêmen [(ge)komen], fon [van] nêf [neef] Inka [inka] ninmer [= nin mer = niet een, geen (taal of teken) meer].

(1) Ênes wordt ook als ênis geschreven en ook omgezet in ynes in de betekenis van eens = op een dag, behandeld als een (oude) negatief zoals thes nachtis = 's nachts, thes mornes = 's morgens, thes middeis = 's middags, thes ewendes = 's avonds, deis = daags, allerweikes = allerweegs, vrmites = vermits, unenes = oneens, jahwelikes = jewelks, jerlikes, jerlikis = jaarlijks, enz. Bijzonder: nachtis and untidis = bij nacht en ontij, zelfs: unmenis = onmens en aefterbaekis = achterbaks.

(2) jahwêder = jeweder = eenieder, in Sachsenspiegel, Sachsische Landrecht

(3) gryns vgl. grijnsaard = knorrepot (ca. 1864), d.i. met tegenzin doen.

As [som] tha [de] bêda [begge] nêva [nevøer] -t-althus [således] navt [ikke] ênes [ens] wrde [bli] koste [kunne], gvng [ganget/gikk] Tünis [Tunis] to [til] aend [og] stek [stakk] en [en] râde [rød] fône [fane] in -t strând [stranda], aend [og] Inka [inka] êne [en] blâwe [blå]. Thêr [Der] aefter [etter] macht [maktet/kunne] jahwêder [enhver] kjasa [keise/velge], hwam [hvem] ek [hver] folgja [følge] wilde [ville], aend [og] wonder [under], by [ved/til] Inka [inka] thêr [der/som] en [en/et] gryns [’grin’] hêde [hadde] vmbe [om/for] tha [de] kaeningar [konger] fon [fra] Findas [Findas] folk [folk] to [å] thjanja [tjene], hlipon [løp] tha [de] mâsta [meste/fleste] Finna [finner] aend [og] Mâgjara [magjarere] ovir [over]. As [som] hja [de] nw [nå] thaet [det] folk [folk] tellath [tellet] aend [og] tha [de] skêpa [skip] thêr [der] nêi [etter] dêlath [delt] hêde [hadde], tha [da] skêdon [skiltes] tha [de] flâta [flåter] fon [fra] ekkorum [hverandre]; fon [fra] nêf [nevø] Tünis [Tunis] is [er] aefternêi [etterpå] tâl [tale/beskjed] kêmen [kommet], fon [fra] nêf [nevø] Inka [inka] ninmer [ingen mer].

Edited by Apol

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Word order (modern Dutch and the OLB language):

Okke min svn.

-1- Thissa boka mot i mith lif aend sêle wârja.

-2- Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk, âk fon vsa êthlum.

-3- Vrlêden jêr haeb ik tham ut-er flod hred tolik mith thi aend thinra moder.

-4- Tha hja wêron wet wrden; thêr thrvch gvngon hja aefternei vrdarva.

Okke, mijn zoon

-1- Deze boeken moet je met lijf ende ziel (be)waren.

-2- Ze omvatten die (ge)schiedenis van ons hele volk, ook van onze ouderen.

-3- Verleden jaar heb ik ze (EN: "them") uit'r vloed (ge)red te(ge)lijk met jou (GER: Du/Dich) ende jouw (GER: deine) moeder.

-4- Daa(r ) zij waren nat (EN: wet) (ge)worden; daar door gingen zij daarna ("achterna") verderven (modern Dutch: BEderven).

.

Okke, min svn,

Okke, min sønn, (Norwegian)

Okke, min sønn, (better language)

Thissa boka mot i mith lif aend sêle wârja.

Disse bøkene må dere med liv og sjel verge (Norwegian).

Disse bøkene må dere verge/verne med liv og sjel (better language).

Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk, âk fon vsa êthlum.

De omfatter historia til vårt hele folk og til våre ætlinger (Norwegian).

De omfatter historia til hele vårt folk og til våre ætlinger (better language).

Vrlêden jêr haeb ik tham ut-er flod hred tolik mith thi aend thinra moder

Forleden år hadde jeg dem ut fra floden reddet, tillike med deg og din moder (Norwegian)

Forleden år reddet jeg dem fra oversvømmelsen, sammen med deg og din mor (better language)

Tha hja wêron wet wrden; thêr thrvch gvngon hja aefternei vrdarva.

da de var våte vorden; der igjennom ganget de etterpå fordervet (Norwegian).

da de var blitt våte; derfor gikk de etterpå i oppløsning (better language).

Edited by Apol

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As [som] tha [de] bêda [begge] nêva [nevøer] -t-althus [således] navt [ikke] ênes [ens] wrde [bli] koste [kunne], gvng [gikk] Tünis [Tunis] to [til] aend [og] stek [stakk] en [en] râde [rød] fône [fane] in -t strând [stranda], aend [og] Inka [inka] êne [en] blâwe [blå]. Thêr [Der] aefter [etter] macht [maktet/kunne] jahwêder [enhver] kjasa [keise/velge], hwam [hvem] ek [hver] folgja [følge] wilde [ville], aend [og] wonder [under], by [ved/til] Inka [inka] thêr [der/som] en [en/et] gryns [’grin’] hêde [hadde] vmbe [om/for] tha [de] kaeningar [konger] fon [fra] Findas [Findas] folk [folk] to [å] thjanja [tjene], hlipon [løp] tha [de] mâsta [meste/fleste] Finna [finner] aend [og] Mâgjara [magjarere] ovir [over]. As [som] hja [de] nw [nå] thaet [det] folk [folk] tellath [tellet] aend [og] tha [de] skêpa [skip] thêr [der] nêi [etter] dêlath [delt] hêde [hadde], tha [da] skêdon [skiltes] tha [de] flâta [flåter] fon [fra] ekkorum [hverandre]; fon [fra] nêf [nevø] Tünis [Tunis] is [er] aefternêi [etterpå] tâl [tale/beskjed] kêmen [kommet], fon [fra] nêf [nevø] Inka [inka] ninmer [ingen mer].

Da begge nevøene således ikke kunne bli enige, gikk Tünis i gang og stakk ei rød fane ned i stranda, og Inka ei blå. Deretter kunne enhver velge hvem han ville følge. Og under! Til Inka, som hadde en avsmak for å tjene kongene av Findas folk, løp de fleste finner og magjarere over. Da de nå hadde telt folket og deretter delt skipene sine, skiltes flåtene fra hverandre. Om nevø Tünis er det etterpå kommet beskjed, fra nevø Inka aldri.

Well done !

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Da begge nevøene således ikke kunne bli enige, gikk Tünis i gang og stakk ei rød fane ned i stranda, og Inka ei blå. Deretter kunne enhver velge hvem han ville følge. Og under! Til Inka, som hadde en avsmak for å tjene kongene av Findas folk, løp de fleste finner og magjarere over. Da de nå hadde telt folket og deretter delt skipene sine, skiltes flåtene fra hverandre. Om nevø Tünis er det etterpå kommet beskjed, fra nevø Inka aldri.

Well done !

Yes, the translation I have published is changed for better getting the intentional meaning of the original text, which really has been a challenge. From time to time it is therefore in fact still not the best Norwegian either. If you translate word by word into Norwegian, you're getting a language which feels old-fashioned. It's especially the word order that makes it sound like that. Modern Norwegian is Danish which over time has become adapted back to a lot of hereditary innate Old Norwegian turns of speech, at the same time as it has received new impulses.

Look at my translation of 'Abramelin's Okke letter, which isn't done directly word by word.

Edited by Apol

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the OLB text is a word-for-word translation from a 19th c. Dutch or Frisian text to some sort of Old Frisian using a simplified grammar.
the word order is 100 % similar to our modern Dutch or to 19th century Dutch.

That is not true.

Much of the word order and vocabulary is similar, but not all.

It is almost as easy for Germans (who have almost the same syntax as us), and as Apol has already shown, even for Scandinavians.

The people that have conquered and christened our lands have had hundreds of years to destroy all texts (except one?) that show we had an ancient culture. What is left are some crappy texts written by Latin-schooled monks who tried to write the language that they only knew in spoken form (and probably it may often not even have been their mother tongue).

Also, you have been brainwashed for centuries with the idea that all of our culture came from the Romans and Greeks.

As you saw on the archaeology maps, the area has been inhabited for thousands of years in relative continuity. The people may have temporarily moved a bit east and south, to move back when possible, or when driven back by invaders. There is no reason why the language of these people had to change dramatically.

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That is not true.

Much of the word order and vocabulary is similar, but not all.

It is almost as easy for Germans (who have almost the same syntax as us), and as Apol has already shown, even for Scandinavians.

The people that have conquered and christened our lands have had hundreds of years to destroy all texts (except one?) that show we had an ancient culture. What is left are some crappy texts written by Latin-schooled monks who tried to write the language that they only knew in spoken form (and probably it may often not even have been their mother tongue).

Also, you have been brainwashed for centuries with the idea that all of our culture came from the Romans and Greeks.

As you saw on the archaeology maps, the area has been inhabited for thousands of years in relative continuity. The people may have temporarily moved a bit east and south, to move back when possible, or when driven back by invaders. There is no reason why the language of these people had to change dramatically.

It is true, and what Apol translated into Norse may look the same, but there are enough sentences in the OLB he cannot translate into Norse using the same word order.

The Christians may have destroyed much of our culture and so on, but they were not capable to destroy all of the Aztec and Mayan cultures, though they have done their best at it. Archeologists still dig up artifacts belonging to those cultures.

A culture that was supposed to be all over Europe only left ONE trace: a manuscript in a village in the Netherlands. Who believes that?

Plus: I never suggested that all of our culture came from the Romans and Greeks. If you really believe that, then you should read what I really posted throughout these years.

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whereas our most ancient writings are as easy to read as those that were written yesterday.

I'd like you to show me an example of that.

Not from the OLB, of course.

Here, try to read this (without Googling):

Eiris sazun idisi, sazun hera duoder; suma hapt heptidun, suma heri lezidun, suma clubodun umbi cuoniouuidi: insprinc haptbandun, inuar uigandun

.

Edited by Abramelin

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Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk, âk fon vsa êthlum.

De omfatter historia til vårt hele folk og til våre ætlinger (Norwegian).

De omfatter historia til hele vårt folk og til våre ætlinger (better language).

Se vmbifattath thju skêdnise fon vs êle folk, âk fon vsa êthlum.

Ze omvatten die (ge)schiedenis van ons hele volk, ook van onze ouderen.

And so on.

I do not have to change the word order in Dutch at all to make it look 'better' Dutch.

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I do not have to change the word order in Dutch at all to make it look 'better' Dutch.

Yes many examples of this can be given. Same for German and Scandinavian languages.

But there are also enough fragments for which it is not at all that easy.

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The name in german "auf deustch" for Wednesday ist "Wodenstag". I believe that was named after Wodin? "Woden's day".

What happened in German with the name of this weekday offers a good example of how the priesthood has tried to change our language and wipe out older traditions.

From the German wiki:

Der Name [Mittwoch] ist seit dem 10. Jahrhundert [...] belegt bzw. in Gebrauch [...] Mit ihm vermied die christliche Missionierung im deutschen Sprachraum den Anklang an vorchristliche Gottheiten, die in der fremdsprachigen Terminologie erhalten blieben

Translated:

The name [Mittwoch = midweek] is in use since the 10th century. With this name, the christian missionaries avoided memory of pre-christian deities in the German speaking lands, that remained in foreign terminology.

Various names for wednesday and what they are named after.

Woden

wednesday - english

wodnesdæg = woden-his-dæg - old-english

woensdag - dutch

woenesdag - westfrisian

woonsdag - nethersaxon

wunsdag - netherdutch (-german)

woansdei - frisian

Odin

Óðinsdagr - old-norsk

onsdag - danish, swedish, norwegian

Oth (the fire or sun)

ოთხშაბათი (othshabati) - georgian

Mercurius

dies mercurii - latin

mercoledì - italian

mercredi - french

miércoles - spanish

dydd mercher - welsh

dimecres - catalan

miercuri - rumanian

Budha

budhavãra - indian (Budh is also planet mercury)

Edited by gestur

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The Christians may have destroyed much of our culture and so on, but they were not capable to destroy all of the Aztec and Mayan cultures, though they have done their best at it.

They started much later, in a time where there was already more awareness of the value of ancient cultures. Besides, they could no longer incorporate what they found into their cult, as they had done with much of the ancient European culture.

A culture that was supposed to be all over Europe only left ONE trace: a manuscript in a village in the Netherlands.

It left many more traces, but people who don't look for it don't see it, simply because it doesn't fit into their belief system. They ignore it.

And/or - as you yourself do - they say that those traces were sources on which the OLB is based (for example the Frisian and Greek 'mythology').

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The verb "to be" is in Dutch "zijn" and in German "sein".

Exactly the same meaning and pronounced almost the same.

In fact, within Germany and the Netherlands/ Flanders there are many varieties of pronouncing.

So why is the spelling different?

From reading alone, one would think that the languages are more different, than that they actually are.

Spelling (of the national language) is a political tool to divide peoples and create fake national identities.

Same for modern Frisian (Frysk): spelling is chosen as to differ as much as possible from Dutch.

Edited by gestur

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